Dec 03, 2022  
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog 
    
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


@ = Indicates a non-liberal arts course. Please refer to College Credit Policies  for a description of non-liberal arts credits.

 

Linguistics

  
  •  

    LNGS 342 - Language and Gender


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA & WI credit.
    This course examines critically the interaction between language and gender. Beginning with an investigation of beliefs about language and about gender and this interaction between the two, the course proceeds to explore the research of male and female speech, seeking to understand the social, psychological, and linguistic processes that underlie sex differences in language use. Finally, in studying the role played by language, speech and communication in defining notions of “male and “female,” the goal will be to understand better the way in which language reflects and reinforces social and cultural patterns of behavior and identity. Cross-listed with ANTH 342 . Fall.

  
  •  

    LNGS 390 - Honors Linguistic Seminar


    1-12 Credit(s)

    This seminar is an introductory course in the description and analysis of language. We will be looking at language from four perspectives: structure, meaning, acquisition, and historical variation. In the Honors section, we will explore a variety of approaches to language and linguistics, including those of Saussure, Sapir, Boas, Jakobson, Labov, Chomsky, and Cameron, to consider how different theoretical frameworks shape the way in which language is studied and our understanding of how language works. As warranted.

    Corequisite(s): LNGS 301 , LNGS 302 , LNGS 310 , or LNGS 320 .
  
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    LNGS 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    LNGS 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
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    LNGS 408 - Language as Formal System


    3 Credit(s)

    Examination of the formal principles of language with emphasis in one or more of the following areas: phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, stylistics, or semiotics. 300-level LNGS course or approved equivalent required. As warranted.

  
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    LNGS 409 - Topics in Applied Linguistics


    3 Credit(s)

    Application of linguistics to language teaching and language learning. Topics may include second language acquisition, second and foreign language teaching, study and treatment of language loss and speech disorders, and the teaching and learning of reading and writing. 300-level LNGS course or approved equivalent required. As warranted.

  
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    LNGS 411 - Topics in Language and Cognition


    3 Credit(s)

    Examination of language as a cognitive process. Topics may include: language and mind, language and brain, psycholinguistics, language acquisition. 300-level LNGS course or approved equivalent required. As warranted.

  
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    LNGS 412 - Topics in Language and Social Interaction


    3 Credit(s)

    Examination of language as a social phenomenon. Topics may include: conversation and discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, bilingualism and multilingualism, pidgins and creoles, dialects, registers, and language variation and change. Cross-listed with COMM 460 . 300-level LNGS course or approved equivalent. As warranted.

  
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    LNGS 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    LNGS 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
  •  

    LNGS 595 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    LNGS 598 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature, or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
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    LNGS 610 - Studies in English Linguistics: Seminar


    3 Credit(s)

    Problems and topics in the study of English linguistics. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): course study in linguistics or history of the English language; proficiency in phonemic transcription may be required, and Graduate standing.
  
  •  

    LNGS 695 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)


Literacy

Where possible, the academic term the course is generally taught has been provided. For courses where no specific term of teaching is provided, students should contact the chair of the department, the Center for Graduate Studies or their adviser for guidance.

  
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    GRDG 595L - Special Topics


    1-6 Credit(s)

    Workshops, seminars and/or institutes designed to meet special needs of teachers, or others interested in initial graduate-level study in the field. Offerings available upon announcement by the School of Education and Professional Studies. Credit earned may be applied, under advisement, as electives in Master of Science in Education/ Master of Science for Teachers degree programs.

  
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    GRDG 600 - Foundations of Literacy


    3 Credit(s)

    This course surveys the history of literacy and theoretical foundations of literacy education. Students will examine the ideological underpinnings of varied approaches to teaching literacy including the teaching of reading, language arts, writing and media. Landmark research of literacy education will be studied in historical contexts and in conjunction with major theories of language development, cognition, and literacy acquisition.

  
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    GRDG 605 - Literacy Assessment and Evaluation


    3 Credit(s)

    This course includes in-depth study of individual and group techniques for literacy assessment and evaluation of children (B-12). Theoretical understanding and assessment of the literacy process will be developed through readings, class discussions, demonstrations and case studies. Students will gain experience in the administration and interpretation of a variety of formal and informal assessment tools, culminating in written literacy assessment reports.

  
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    GRDG 610 - Seminar: Literacy Research


    3 Credit(s)

    The purpose of this seminar is to acquaint students with research methods and current topics, studies and writings in the area of literacy. The objectives of this course include preparing students to be consumers of literacy research and enhance their ability to find information, studies, and data in a variety of research journals and texts both online and in hardcopy. Students will explore a wide range of current literacy topics and make reports, presentations and demonstrations throughout the course.

  
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    GRDG 615 - Literacy: Family/School/Community Collaboration


    3 Credit(s)

    of current research concerning literacy education and diverse families and communities. Students will discuss current practices and future trends of collaboration between diverse literacy models of development of schools, families, and communities to support children’s literacy development.

  
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    GRDG 620 - Literacy and Linguistically Diverse Learners


    3 Credit(s)

    This course explores the many challenges to literacy achievement that confront linguistically diverse learners (speakers of non-standard English varieties and English speakers of other languages). From a contemporary perspective, the course examines the characteristics of linguistically diverse learners in B-12 classrooms and focuses on instructional responses that foster literacy competencies and achievement in school.

  
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    GRDG 625 - Using Technology to Teach Literacy


    3 Credit(s)

    This course involves a case-based approach to teaching literacy and the use of technology in literacy education. Authentic literacy situations are presented to the students for observation and analysis. Samples of classroom work and a variety of assessment records form an important part of this course in order to present a comprehensive picture of literacy development and needs among children with a range of abilities. Based on cumulative records, current assessment, classroom work and multi-media cases, students will gain insight into instructional decision-making with technology for the purpose of enhancing literacy abilities among children.

  
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    GRDG 638 - Teaching Reading for Students with Special Needs


    3 Credit(s)

    The purpose of this course is to prepare preservice and inservice special education teachers with theoretical frameworks and practical applications of assessment and intervention strategies in literacy (P- 12). The course includes frameworks and philosophies of assessment and intervention strategies in early childhood through adolescent literacy. Students will explore assessment and intervention methods and activities that can be used to assist and enhance literacy abilities of students with varying abilities.

  
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    GRDG 640 - Literature-Based Literacy Instruction


    3 Credit(s)

    Selected examples of children’s and young adult literature are utilized in demonstrating methods of developing literacy using a literature based approach. Special emphasis is placed on the use of such materials for enriching classroom literacy programs, individualizing student literacy development, and designing literacy intervention programs. This course involves extensive reading of literature, developing of strategies for teaching reading, writing, speaking, and listening through the use of literature, and focusing curricula development to represent the multiple levels, broad interests, cultural and linguistic backgrounds of all learners B-12. MSEd Literacy students only.

  
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    GRDG 655 - Literacy Intervention Strategies Birth-6


    3 Credit(s)

    The purpose of this course is to prepare preservice and inservice teachers with theoretical frameworks and practical applications of appropriate intervention strategies in literacy (B-6). The course includes frameworks and philosophies of intervention strategies in early childhood and childhood literacy. A repertoire of methods and activities will be used to assist and enhance literacy abilities among children and will culminate in student-created programs of age- and grade-appropriate literacy intervention strategies. A central theme of this course will be to match appropriate instruction with assessed literacy difficulties.

  
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    GRDG 656 - Literacy Intervention Strategies 5-12


    3 Credit(s)

    The purpose of this course is to prepare preservice and inservice teachers with theoretical frameworks and practical applications of appropriate intervention strategies in literacy (5-12). The course includes frameworks and philosophies of intervention strategies in middle childhood and adolescence literacy. A repertoire of methods and activities will be used to assist and enhance literacy abilities among children and will culminate in student-created programs of age- and grade-appropriate literacy intervention strategies. A central theme of this course will be to match appropriate instruction with assessed literacy difficulties.

  
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    GRDG 660 - Teaching Writing Birth-6


    3 Credit(s)

    This course integrates theory and practice for teaching writing in elementary school. The reciprocal relationship between writing and reading is emphasized. Topics include writing development, responding to and evaluating student writing, and strategies for teaching the writing processes in elementary classrooms.

  
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    GRDG 661 - Teaching Writing Grades 5-12


    3 Credit(s)

    In this course students learn and apply the process approach to writing. They will learn how to teach students drafting, revising, proof reading and editing their writing; they will learn how to teach strategies for writing across the content areas; they will reinforce the skills needed for the conventions of standard written English. Writing portfolios, peer review, and publishing also will be addressed.

  
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    GRDG 665 - Emergent Literacy


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines the relationship of language and cognition, the effects of home and community environments on language acquisition, and the stages of oral and written language development in young children. Instructional practices for emergent literacy of this course include guided reading, shared reading/writing, reading aloud, the language experience approach, and explicit phonics instruction.

  
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    GRDG 670 - Teaching Reading and Study Skills in the Content Area


    3 Credit(s)

    Material and methods for teaching vocabulary, comprehension and study skills, with heavy emphasis on practical approaches to reading problems encountered in the content fields. Extensive practice is afforded in formal and informal testing, pupil interests and recreational reading.

  
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    GRDG 681 - Literacy Educator Portfolio


    3 Credit(s)

    This culminating activity is an intentional grouping of samples of work completed throughout the concentration. The portfolio provides evidence of achievement and documents students’ reflection on their learning experiences and professional growth as literacy educators as a result of those experiences. The portfolio also is a process designed for instructors to reflect on the program’s ability to achieve its learning outcomes. Students receive general instructions on compiling evidence and assembling the portfolio initially in GRDG 600 , Foundations of Literacy, and are provided with additional instruction in each of the courses in the MSEd Literacy program. MSEd Literacy Educator students only. Permission of department chairperson.

  
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    GRDG 690 - Literacy Practicum, Birth-Grade 2


    3 Credit(s)

    The purpose of this course is to apply theories, knowledge and activities from previous literacy courses in a school environment. Students will assess literacy needs of children, and design an appropriate intervention program based on this assessment. Students will write a journal and progress reports on the pupils they tutor in birth-grade 2 levels. The practicum will include a minimum of 50 clock hours in a school-based setting. To be taken in the final semester of coursework.

    Prerequisite(s): GRDG 600 , GRDG 605  and GRDG 655 / GRDG 656 .
  
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    GRDG 691 - Literacy Practicum, Grades 3-6


    3 Credit(s)

    The purpose of this course is to apply theories, knowledge and activities from previous literacy courses in a school environment. Students will assess literacy needs of children, and design an appropriate intervention program based on this assessment. Students will write a journal and progress reports on the pupils they tutor in grades 3-6 levels. The practicum will include a minimum of 50 clock hours in a school-based setting. To be taken in the final semester of coursework.

    Prerequisite(s): GRDG 600 , GRDG 605  and GRDG 655  GRDG 656 .
  
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    GRDG 695L - Special Topics


    1-6 Credit(s)

    Workshops, seminars and/or institutes designed to meet special needs of teachers, or others interested in initial graduate-level study in the field. Offerings available upon announcement by the School of Education and Professional Studies. Credit earned may be applied, under advisement, as electives in Master of Science in Education/ Master of Science for Teachers degree programs.

  
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    GRDG 696 - Literacy Practicum, Grades 5-8


    3 Credit(s)

    The purpose of this course is to apply theories, knowledge and activities from previous literacy courses in a school environment. Students will assess literacy needs of children, and design an intervention program based on this assessment. Students will write a journal and progress reports on the pupils they tutor in grade 5-8 levels. The practicum will include a minimum of 50 clock hours in a school-based setting. To be taken in the final semester of coursework.

    Prerequisite(s): GRDG 600 , GRDG 605  and GRDG 655 /GRDG 656 .
  
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    GRDG 697 - Literacy Practicum, Grades 9-12


    3 Credit(s)

    The purpose of this course is to apply theories, knowledge and activities from previous literacy courses in a school environment. Students will assess literacy needs of children, and design an intervention program based on this assessment. Students will write a journal and progress reports on the pupils they tutor in grade 9-12 levels. The practicum will include a minimum of 50 clock hours in a school-based setting. To be taken in the final semester of coursework.

    Prerequisite(s): GRDG 600 , GRDG 605  and GRDG 655 /GRDG 656 .
  
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    GRDG 699 - Literacy Internship


    6 Credit(s)

    MSEd Literacy Specialist candidates intern at a school for an entire school year under the supervision of a NYS certified reading/literacy specialist. The focus of their work is on early identification of struggling readers and implementing intervention-based programs. The internship will complete the requirement for the practicum. Students are required to complete assignments designed to demonstrate evidence of competence in developing assessment-driven interventions, communicating assessment results, continuing to pursue professional development, and orchestrating professional development programs. Permission of department chair.


Literature

  
  •  

    LITR 100 - Introduction to Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: FC credit.
    Introduction to elements of literature through the study of its various forms: poetry, drama, and fiction. Practice in writing about literature and in techniques of close reading and critical thinking. This course cannot be taken if credit has been received for LITR 110 . Fall and Spring.

  
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    LITR 110 - Writing About Literature


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: FW credit.
    Introduction to elements of literature through the study of its various forms. This course differs from LITR 100  in that there is extensive attention to writing, revising, and the use of information resources. This course cannot be taken if credit has been received for LITR 100 . As warranted.

  
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    LITR 120 - Film Foundations


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    An introductory course that looks at aspects of film history, criticism, and production. It provides an overview of the moving picture as both popular culture and serious art form, and looks at its various elements. Students will have a chance to view and critique films and to participate in a creative project related to filmmaking. Yearly.

  
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    LITR 130 - Film and Fiction


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: FS credit.
    Interrelationships between film and literature, particularly novels, which have been adapted for use on the screen. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    LITR 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
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    LITR 200 - Literary Traditions


    3 Credit(s)

    Provides an introductory survey of some of the major works, writers, and periods of Western literary history. The course covers classical works of Mediterranean origins through literature of the present day, and may include examples from British, American, and Western European cultures. Fall and Spring.

  
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    LITR 201 - Patterns of Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Provides experience in recognizing and responding critically to one or more common narrative (or other structural) strategies, including topics, plot structures, character types, and other recurrent patterns used in literature across historical, linguistic, and geographic boundaries. Examples include (but are not restricted to): quest/hero narratives, travel narratives, lyric poems, captivity/liberation narratives, coming-of-age stories, formal comedy, formal tragedy, star-crossed lovers, “Cinderella” stories, etc. Fall and Spring.

  
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    LITR 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    LITR 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
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    LITR 300 - Literary Analysis & Research


    3 Credit(s)

    Provides an introduction to advanced literary criticism. In addition to reviewing the basics of literary criticism (e.g., interpretation supported by close reading), the course will introduce and examine a number of different methods of reading, analyzing, and writing about literature, including feminist, Marxist, post-colonial, and new historical approaches. The course will also focus on using scholarly research to write about literature, and it will introduce students to the specialized terms that scholars us when talking about literature. Fall and Spring.

  
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    LITR 301 - American Writers


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Studies in American literature. Authors, themes, periods and/or regions vary from semester to semester. Yearly.

  
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    LITR 302 - British Writers


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Studies in British literature. Authors, themes, periods and/or regions vary from semester to semester. Yearly.

  
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    LITR 303 - World Writers


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Studies in World literature. Authors, themes, periods, and/or cultures vary from semester to semester. No knowledge of a foreign language is necessary. The literature under investigation is written in or translated into English. Yearly.

  
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    LITR 304 - Literary Nonfiction


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Studies various types of nonfiction, e.g., biography, informal essay, new journalism. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 305 - Short Story


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Studies in the short story as a literary genre. Readings from a wide variety of authors and critical perspectives. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 306 - Drama


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Studies in the drama as a literary genre. Readings from a wide variety of authors and critical perspectives. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 307 - Poetry


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Studies in poetry as a literary genre as defined by its forms, techniques, and devices that distinguish poetry as a genre. Readings from a wide variety of authors and critical perspectives. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 308 - The Novel


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Examines traditional and modern novels from a variety of critical perspectives. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 309 - Topics in Literary Genres


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Studies in literary genres other than literary nonfiction, the short story, drama, poetry or the novel. May include traditional genres such as the epic or new genres such as hypertext fiction or the graphic novel. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 321 - Topics in Literary Sub-Genres


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Readings from any of a variety of literary sub-genres such as horror, the Gothic novel, or the historical novel. Topics vary. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 322 - Children’s Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    History of children’s books, tracing emergence of a body of genuine literature for children. Fall and Spring.

  
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    LITR 323 - Young Adult Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Selection and study of literature appropriate for secondary English classrooms. Intensive and extensive reading of contemporary young adult literature and classic literary texts. Some attention to critical approaches used in studying texts and secondary literature curriculum. Fall and Spring.

  
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    LITR 324 - Crime/Detective Fiction


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Interrogates crime and detective fiction in terms of type, “hard-boiled detective” fiction, “white-glove drawing room” fiction, film noir; and in terms of time period, nineteenth-century antecedents, early-twentieth-century proliferations, later 20thcentury reworkings. This course may also examine specific authors in depth, including Agatha Christie, Raymond Chandler, Dorothy Sayers, Dashiell Hammett, Georges Simenon, James Ellroy, and others. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 325 - Utopian Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Examines the development of the utopia as a literary genre through a broad sampling of works that fit into the utopian tradition, including examples of positive utopias (or eutopias), negative utopias (or dystopias), and works that critically examine the viability of utopian philosophies (meta-utopias). As warranted.

  
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    LITR 326 - Fantasy Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Examines selected works from the fantasy genre. Origins of fantasy literature in epic and romance emphasized. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 328 - Science Fiction


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Examines science fiction as literature, examined with techniques of literary analysis. Development of valid working definitions of science fiction. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 330 - Topics in Film


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Various topics relating to film history, directors, actors, genres. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 120 .
  
  •  

    LITR 344 - Parody


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    History of parody as a mode of literary criticism and humor. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 346 - Satire


    3 Credit(s)

    A broad survey of satire as a literary technique, looking both at a wide range of examples of satirical texts as well as at critical works that discuss how satire functions. The goal of the course is to differentiate satire from other closely related literary concepts such as humor, irony, parody, invective, etc. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 347 - Metaphor


    3 Credit(s)

    Surveys the rich landscape of metaphor and other types of figurative language, including simile, metonymy, synecdoche, allegory, personification, etc., as they are found in literature as well as in ordinary conversation. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 348 - Irony


    3 Credit(s)

    Irony plays with contradictions between appearances and reality. We examine the many ways in which irony has been described as well as how literature has been shaped by these descriptions from the Greeks to contemporary writers. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 351 - Nature and Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Explores the varied ways nature is represented in art and literature and the ways those representations express the cultural values of the times in which they were created. Yearly.

  
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    LITR 352 - Nationality and Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Examines ways in which themes associated with national identity have been expressed in or otherwise have affected works of literature. This course may focus on a specific time period and/or group (e.g., nationalism in British Restoration drama) or may more generally survey the ways in which a nationalist perspective can affect both the construction and reception of literary texts. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 353 - Social Movements and Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Surveys of literature’s rhetorical function, specifically as it examines literatures associated with social movements and activism. The course may focus on a specific time period and/or group and may overlap with other themed courses in which movements promoting racial-or-gender-equity are developed, or in which national or cultural identities are asserted. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 354 - Psychology and Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Examines the ways literature is influenced by psychoanalytic thought or emphasizes the psychological states of characters and/or authors. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 355 - Gender and Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Examines of the relationship between literary portrayals of women and men and their changing roles in society. Emphasis given to cultural and social aspects of gender and identity. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 356 - Race and Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Examines the ways in which race and issues surrounding race (e.g., how the notion of race originated and developed; how race differs from ethnicity or cultural tradition, etc.) have been expressed in or otherwise have affected works of literature. The course may focus on a specific time period and/or group (e.g., race and the Harlem Renaissance) or may more generally survey the ways in which so-called racial marking can affect both the construction and reception of literary texts. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 358 - Class and Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Examines the ways in which social class issues have been expressed in or otherwise have affected works of literature. The course may focus on a specific time period and/or group (e.g., the American Proletarian Novel of the 1930s) or may more generally survey the ways in which particular issues related to economics and/or social status can affect both the construction and reception of literary texts. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 359 - Literary Themes


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Development and variation of important themes in literature. Course content will vary from semester to semester. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 371 - Classical Heritage


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC & WI credit.
    The literature of Greece and Rome with consideration of how that heritage has continued in English and American literature. Attention to critical approaches and practice in writing about literature. Yearly.

  
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    LITR 372 - Biblical Heritage


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC & WI credit.
    The literature of the Bible and medieval Christendom with consideration of how that heritage has continued in English and American literature. Attention to critical approaches and practices in writing about literature. Yearly.

  
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    LITR 373 - Mythical Heritage


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC & WI credit.
    The folkloric and mythic tradition in literature, such as the legends of King Arthur, from a variety of sources, including contemporary treatments of the tradition. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 374 - Classical Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    An introduction to the literature of classical Greece and Rome: a broad sample for the student otherwise unacquainted with ancient literature and culture. As warranted.

  
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    LITR 380 - Literary Criticism


    3 Credit(s)

    History and methods of literary and aesthetic theory and practices from the ancient Greeks to the present. As warranted.

  
  •  

    LITR 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    LITR 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
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    LITR 405 - Greek and Roman Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores literature written by the ancient Greeks and Romans. Topics and authors vary. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201 , and LITR 300 .
  
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    LITR 407 - Medieval Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the major works and authors of the period in Europe from AD 500 to the 15th century and will also focus on its culture of Christianity, Arthurian Legends, and the Crusades. Students will explore Old English poetry with works like Beowulf, Caedmon’s Hymn, and the Elegies, and will also read works by major authors such as Chaucer, Christine de Pizan, Julian of Norwich, and Margery Kempe. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201 , and LITR 300 .
  
  •  

    LITR 408 - Chaucer


    3 Credit(s)

    Reading of Chaucer’s major works, consideration of the works in their cultural setting, examinations of various critical approaches to Chaucer, discussion of his place in English literary history. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201 , and LITR 300 .
  
  •  

    LITR 410 - Shakespeare I: Comedies


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the major plays, including attention to genre and to Shakespeare’s artistic development. Does not overlap with LITR 411 . As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201 , and LITR 300 .
  
  •  

    LITR 411 - Shakespeare II: History and Tragedies


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the major plays, including attention to genre and to Shakespeare’s artistic development. Does not overlap with LITR 410 . As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201 , and LITR 300 .
  
  •  

    LITR 412 - British Renaissance Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines major works of the 16thand 17thcentury, including the period during and after Elizabeth I, the fifth and last monarch of the Tudor Dynasty. Students will read works by major authors such as Shakespeare, Marlowe, Milton, Jonson, Aphra Behn, and Anne Bradstreet via exploring major historical movements of the period such as the Renaissance, Humanism and Idealism. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201  and LITR 300 .
  
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    LITR 413 - British Enlightenment Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Readings in the “long century” (1660-1780), including the so-called Age of Reason, and the origins of the British Novel. Authors or focus may vary from semester to semester. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201 , and LITR 300 .
  
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    LITR 414 - British Romanticism


    3 Credit(s)

    An era of dramatic contrasts as well as unsettling social and literary change, this period saw the French and American Revolutions, Napoleon’s war with Britain, and heated debate over women’s rights, sexual mores, and the rights of slaves. Readings in a wide range of Romantic-era texts: sentimental & satirical, narrative & lyric poetry; a Romantic novel & a play; nonfiction prose including literary manifestoes, political essays & social commentary, travel journals, diaries & memoirs, literary reviews, portraits & political cartoons. Writers studied may vary from semester to semester. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201 , and LITR 300 .
  
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    LITR 419 - Victorian Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Queen Victoria reigned from 1837-1901 and gave her name to an age. The nineteenth century saw massive changes in many areas-technology, population migrations, science, religion, nationalisms, sexuality, and class-and the course will consider how literature reflected, and sometimes shaped, those changes. Authors or focus may vary from semester to semester. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201 , and LITR 300 .
  
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    LITR 421 - British Modernism


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines texts produced during the height of modernism (roughly 1910 to 1940), focusing on how social, cultural, and economic factors influenced modernist authors and their texts. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201 , and LITR 300 .
  
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    LITR 422 - Contemporary British Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines literature written from 1950 to the present. The course may be focused on the works of particular writers or groups of writers, themes, genres/sub-genres, etc., or may present a general overview of the period. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201 , and LITR 300 .
  
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    LITR 423 - Commonwealth and Post-Colonial Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the disparate voices of contemporary British literature: white, brown, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, working class, queer, straight, and combinations thereof as they negotiate the legacies of imperialism and colonialism. Authors and focus may vary from semester to semester. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201  and LITR 300 .
  
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    LITR 429 - Topics in British Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to engage in inquiry on a special topic, either generic, period-specific, or themed. Authors and focus will vary from semester to semester. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201  and LITR 300 .
  
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    LITR 430 - Advanced Topics in Film


    4 Credit(s)

    Various topics relating to film theory, aesthetics, national cinemas. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 330 .
  
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    LITR 434 - Colonial American Literature


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines literary and non-literary texts produced by European explorers, early American settlers, and Native Americans during the periods of cultural contact and colonization. Focusing on contact narratives, promotional tracts, religious sermons and poetry, as well as the discourses that shaped and justified colonialism, the seminar also gives special attention to what constitutes American literature as the concepts of both “American” and “literature” evolved from the age of exploration through the eighteenth century. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201  and LITR 300 .
  
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    LITR 435 - American Romanticism


    3 Credit(s)

    Focuses specifically on American literary romanticism throughout the 1800s. We consider the early manifestations of romanticism, the glory days of the American Renaissance, and the often cynical aftermath of romanticism as seen through realism and naturalism. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201  and LITR 300  or permission of instructor.
  
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    LITR 436 - American Realism and Naturalism


    3 Credit(s)

    Starts in the aftermath of the Civil War and considers the movement away from romanticism, the restraints upon character choice, the increased attention to middle class and lower class life, the development of psychological complexity in character, and the formalist techniques for representing mimesis, especially fragmentation and perspectivism. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): LITR 200  or LITR 201 , and LITR 300 .
 

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