Sep 28, 2022  
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog 
    
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


@ = Indicates a non-liberal arts course. Please refer to College Credit Policies  for a description of non-liberal arts credits.

 

Inclusive and Special Education

  
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    SPED 609 - Field Experience I


    1 Credit(s)

    This experience will provide preservice special education teachers the opportunity to observe, participate, and reflect upon procedures and activities in special education programs in the public schools. Observation of classroom organization, models of service delivery, student strengths and weaknesses, instructional techniques, and behavior management strategies will be conducted. A philosophy of service to students with disabilities will be developed. Fall.

    Corequisite(s): SPED 601 , SPED 650 .
  
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    SPED 612 - Technology in Special Education


    3 Credit(s)

    This is a survey of the varied applications of recent technology, focusing on computer-based technology, in the field of special education. Students will work with hardware and software that allow the integration of children with special learning needs into the regular educational program. In addition, they will gain a broad understanding of the variety of technologies designed to meet the special needs of individuals with disabilities.

  
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    SPED 637 - Diagnosis and Assessment of Educational Disabilities


    3 Credit(s)

    Provides information regarding techniques for the assessment of special learning needs for individual learners; provides instruction and practice in observation, recording, charting, and curriculum-based assessment; includes experience in selecting, administering, scoring, and interpreting standardized tests; discusses use of formal and informal assessment data in preparing and monitoring Individualized Education Programs; addresses current issues and philosophy of assessment. Fall and Spring.

    Pre/Corequisite(s): SPED 601 .

  
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    SPED 638 - Literacy Assessment and Practices for Students with Diverse Needs


    3 Credit(s)

    The purpose of this course is to prepare preservice and inservice Inclusive and Special Education teachers with theoretical frameworks and practical applications of assessment and intervention strategies in literacy (P-12). Content includes critical evaluation of assessments and interpretation of data to inform selection of research based instructional practices. These incorporate strategies in reading, writing, listening, and speaking in teaching content across the general curriculum; and for enhancing communication for ELL.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 601  and SPED 650 .
    Corequisite(s): SPED 607 .
  
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    SPED 640 - Behavior Management for the Special Educator


    3 Credit(s)

    Considers and provides practice in a range of techniques to achieve behavioral, social, and academic changes among students with disabilities; includes discussion of a range of techniques, including applied behavioral analysis, cognitive behavior modification and social skills training; investigates ways to facilitate behavioral changes in a variety of environments; considers the philosophical implications of various approaches in management of behavior.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 601  and SPED 650 .
    Corequisite(s): SPED 637 .
  
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    SPED 642 - Communication and Early Literacy in Young Children with Disabilities


    3 Credit(s)

    This course considers communication and emergent literacy skills in children (birth to Grade 2) from a developmental perspective; addresses the role of parents as the child’s first language teachers; develops skills for diagnosing and remediating delays in language acquisition in young children with a variety of disabilities. Spring.

  
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    SPED 646 - Strategies for Teaching Elementary Students with Learning/Behavioral Disabilities


    3 Credit(s)

    Discusses selection, development and implementation of appropriate teaching strategies for use with elementary students with mild/moderate disabilities; includes developmental, remedial and compensatory strategies for use in instruction and management, modifications to materials, teaching approaches, and the physical environment, and the use of on-going evaluation procedures for monitoring student progress; develops competencies in the formulation of Individualized Education Programs. A multidisciplinary approach to education will be stressed. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 601  and SPED 637 .
  
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    SPED 647 - Strategies for Teaching Secondary Students with Learning/Behavioral Disabilities


    3 Credit(s)

    Discusses selection, development and implementation of appropriate teaching strategies including those related, though not limited to English, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies for use with secondary students with mild/moderate disabilities. This course also incorporates: developmental, remedial and compensatory strategies for use in instruction and management, modifications to materials, teaching approaches, and the physical environment, and the use of on-going evaluation procedures for monitoring student progress; the development of competencies in the formulation of Individualized Education Programs; discussion of life skills curricula and vocational education, as well as transition from school to community. A multidisciplinary approach to education will be stressed.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 601 , SPED 637 , and SPED 650 .
    Corequisite(s): SPED 649 .
  
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    SPED 648 - Strategies for Early Childhood Special Education


    3 Credit(s)

    Identifies the learning and behavioral needs of pre-school children with disabilities; considers the philosophical issues involved in providing services in the least restrictive environment; develops competencies in working with multidisciplinary teams to develop Individual Family Service Plans; discusses the selection, development, and implementation of teaching strategies for use with pre-school children with disabilities; discusses procedures for monitoring student progress and communicating that progress to parents. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 601  and SPED 637 .
  
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    SPED 649 - Field Experience II


    1 Credit(s)

    This course will provide pre-service special education teachers the opportunity to acquire experience in planning and conducting instruction with various groups of students with diverse learning needs to meet their academic and/or social needs. This experience will also include design and use of assessment techniques for evaluating student progress. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 601  and SPED 637 .
  
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    SPED 650 - Collaborative Consultation with Professionals and Families


    3 Credit(s)

    Explore and develop competencies needed to work in cooperation with other special educators, general educators and families, as well as support personnel, with the goal of effectively maintaining learners with mild/moderate disabilities in general classroom settings; includes the skills of communication, consultation, conflict resolution, sharing of assessment results, conduct of conferences and processes for collaborative development of Individualized Education Programs.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 601  or concurrent registration with SPED 601  and SPED 637 .
  
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    SPED 669 - Practicum in Special Education


    3 or 6 Credit(s)

    Provides experience in the application of techniques for evaluation and instructional programming for learners with mild/moderate learning and behavioral disabilities; work with students shall include educational assessment, implementation of Individualized Education Programs, and planning for instructional activities designed to meet identified student needs. Summer (6 credits), Fall and Spring (3 credits).

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all course requirements for the MSEd Special Education.
  
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    SPED 670 - Culminating Experience


    1 Credit(s)

    This culminating activity includes the compilation of a portfolio including samples of work completed during the program. This process is designed to allow students and instructors to reflect on the experiences in the program and their growth as a result of their experiences. Students receive specific instructions on the assembly of the portfolio during their first semester. Summer, Fall and Spring.

  
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    SPED 695S - Special Topics


    1-6 Credit(s)

    Workshops, seminars and/or institutes designed to meet needs of teachers, or others interested in initial graduate-level study in the field of special education. Offerings available upon announcement by the School of Education and Professional Studies. Credit earned may be applied, under advisement, as electives in Master of Science in Education/Master of Science for Teachers degree programs.


Information and Communication Technology

Note: These courses do not meet Computer Science major or minor requirements.

  
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    @IT 514 - Computer Applications for Content Area Teaching


    3 Credit(s)

    This course presents an introduction to computer applications used to support instruction in an instructional setting. Students gain experience with software suites, using the internet and electronic communications, and various other software applications. The emphasis in this course is on conveying teaching strategies for use when applying computers to instruction, as well as using technology to support current learning standards. Introductory course for secondary education students. Fall and Spring.


Instructional Design

  
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    ID 615 - Critical Issues in Management


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is intended to examine sociological and philosophical problems with the implementation of technological innovations in performance improvement settings. Topical areas will include implications of the use of selected learning theories, systematic processes, evaluation techniques and theories. Fall (even years).

  
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    ID 621 - Developing STEM Learning Materials


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides students with the tools and resources needed to produce STEM learning materials. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the problem-solving skills associated with the development of instructional and training products that promote inquiry-based learning. Fall

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of ICT Department.
  
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    ID 625 - History and Philosophy of Technology Utilization


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to help graduate students understand the rationale and development of the instructional technology movement in the United States during the last century. The implications for teaching and learning from various educational philosophies and theories will be analyzed and investigated as they relate to current practices in performance technology. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): IT 635 plus three other IT courses.
  
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    ID 635 - Research Techniques


    3 Credit(s)

    This course explores current research and theory in the field of performance technology. Topics covered will be concerned with development and design theory, practices and procedures, including content structure, course organization, course sequence, and instructional strategies. It will include locating and interpreting information from published reports and using research to explore questions related to performance technology. Fall (odd years).

  
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    ID 647 - Technology Coaching


    3 Credit(s)

    This course explores leadership styles that influence the teaching and training of professionals. Students will explore the dimensions of personality, temperament, and coaching models to develop appropriate learning strategies for adults (andragogy).

  
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    ID 648 - Principles of Performance Technology


    3 Credit(s)

    The purpose of the course is to develop an understanding of new ways of doing business by encouraging professionals to approach their work with broader, multi-disciplinary perspectives. Students will be exposed to work in performance analysis, information support, knowledge management, appraisal and other important themes and interventions.

  
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    ID 650 - Seminar in Instructional Design


    3 Credit(s)

    Seminar addressing topics and issues meeting the special needs of school systems, groups of teachers, or others interested in the study and application of technology for performance improvement.

  
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    ID 651 - Systematic Design For Performance Improvement


    3 Credit(s)

    This is a course for educators interested in designing performance improvement systems, from classroom/lecture to individualized instruction. Students will explore the various components of the instructional design process including content analysis, sequencing, goal analysis and instructional strategies as they develop instructional sequences. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): IT 635 recommended.
  
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    ID 653 - Instructional Planning & Development Process


    3 Credit(s)

    This course involves students in practical training in instructional planning and development. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the relationship between planning and development theory and practice. The course will provide an opportunity for students to examine the planning process in the context of instructional environments.

  
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    ID 654 - Program Evaluation


    3 Credit(s)

    This course involves students in practical training in program evaluation. Topics will include audience identification, evaluation design, question formulation, data gathering, analysis, reporting and meta-evaluation.

    Prerequisite(s): IT 635 recommended.
  
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    ID 657 - Practicum in Technology


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides students in the ICT program an opportunity to synthesize technology knowledge and skills. Each student works in a selected field setting to improve the use of technology. Working from an approved plan of action, the student works with a site supervisor, maintains a log of activities and accomplishments, and submits a final report.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and at least 5 IT courses.
  
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    ID 659 - Technology Product Development


    3 Credit(s)

    This course serves as the culminating project course for the Instructional Design program, and should be taken in the final semester of coursework. Students create an online digital portfolio, highlighting the projects they have completed and the knowledge they have gained throughout the program. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and at least 5 ID courses.

  
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    ID 661 - Advanced Instructional Design


    3 Credit(s)

    This course applies Instructional Design theories and principles to open-ended, problem-based learning environments. Students will identify a setting, and then design and develop materials appropriate for promoting authentic learning in that space.

    Prerequisite(s): IT 551 Systematic Instructional Design.
  
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    ID 666 - Simulations and Games


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is a seminar in simulations and games. The purpose of this course is for the students to acquire an understanding of the historical development of simulations and games and how they can (and have been) used. Students will apply their knowledge in creating a simulation or game, as well as developing and carrying out a research study on an appropriate topic. Along with the course projects, students will be expected to discuss assigned readings.

  
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    ID 668 - Distance Education


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will introduce students to the history, research, practice and potential of distance education. Current controversies and problems such as increasing drop-out rates, questions of course ownership, and lack of interaction will be discussed and solutions proposed in a hands-on manner making use of online computer conferencing. Spring (even years).


Instructional Technology

  
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    IT 518 - Computers in Education


    3 Credit(s)

    This course presents an introduction to varied computer applications in education. Students receive knowledge of and experience with computer-aided instruction, word processing, and spreadsheet software. Emphasis is placed on understanding the role of computer technology in elementary classrooms. No previous computer experience is required. This is an introductory course for both elementary education and secondary education students. Summer, Fall and Spring.

  
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    @IT 529 - Computer Applications/Performance Improvement


    3 Credit(s)

    Students will explore the use of computers as a tool for instructional applications in education. Word processing, database management, spreadsheet creation, and presentation software will all be covered. Internet-based communications tools will also be emphasized. Emphasis will be placed on developing practical applications for education settings in a cross-platform environment.

    Prerequisite(s): basic word processing, mouse skills, some internet experience, to be augmented by jumpstart classes if these skills are lacking. Intermediate-level course.
  
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    IT 539 - Network Management


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is intended to provide graduate students in technology programs with a conceptual background and initial experience in computer network installation and management. The course will emphasize the nature and structure of both local area networks and wide area networks involving a variety of computer platforms and operating systems. Students will develop an understanding of how to work with networking hardware and software, and to plan, select, install, manage, and maintain computer-based telecommunications networks including configuring and customizing the operating systems of computers and computer networks in various settings. Fall

  
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    @IT 544 - Desktop Publishing


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is an exploration of the graphic design and print process. It will explore the basic concepts of design theory rooted in readings and research by professionals in the field. Students will leave the course with skills and experience in using a computer to creatively interact with the software tools to generate professional and educational materials. Students will design logos, brochures, magazines, board games, newsletters, infographics and more. Sumer

  
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    @IT 545 - Preparing and Delivering Professional Presentations


    3 Credit(s)

    The purpose of this course is to prepare students to design, develop and deliver professional presentations. In this course students will utilize paper and electronic resources for the production of presentation materials. Topics of user interface design, audience characteristics and message design will be covered.

  
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    IT 546 - Preparing Performance Support Materials


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the computer-based preparation of instructional materials. Students will become familiar with principles of message design and the guidelines that pertain to creating instructional materials on a computer. Using a range of software and multimedia applications, students will design and develop such materials as informational pamphlets, handouts, worksheets, tests, overhead transparencies and webpages. Students will have the opportunity to apply their knowledge and understanding of course concepts in a series of assignments and a final project.

  
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    @IT 549 - Webpage Development


    3 Credit(s)

    The course is intended to provide students with experience in webpage design and development. The course will emphasize the understanding of the design principles and hypertext markup language used to create web sites. Students will work with a variety of media, such as audio, video, text, and graphics to exploit the personal computer’s ability to present information through the Internet. Introductory course.

  
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    IT 552 - Computer Graphics


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is a survey of various computer graphic types and applications, including still graphics, log creation, desktop publishing, motion graphics, animation, and video production. This is an introductory course that serves as an introduction to computer graphics for ICT majors, as well as a technology elective for non-majors. Fall.

  
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    IT 605 - Network Architecture


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will examine telecommunications fundamentals including data, voice, image, and video and the concepts, models, architectures, protocols, standards, and security for the design, implementation, and management of digital networks. Essentials of local area networks (LAN), metropolitan area networks (MAN), and wide area networks (WAN) will be examined. Regulatory and technical environments also will be reviewed. Spring.

  
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    IT 614 - Technology in Education


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is a survey of various technologies, both computer based and non-computer based, for use in instructional settings. Topics covered include sound capture and editing, video capture editing, computer graphics, applied learning theories, and various other technologies. Students will receive hands-on instruction in each area, and will create a project in each of these areas which reflect a theory of learning. Intermediate level - not an introductory level course.

  
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    IT 623 - Programming and Authoring for the Internet


    3 Credit(s)

    The course will cover advanced web page development through the use of html and a variety of programming and authoring tools including JavaScript, and XML. Emphasis will be placed on the effective use of these tools to create interactive webpages. Summer.

  
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    IT 649 - Advanced Web Page Development


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is intended to provide students with practical experience in webpage design and development. The course will emphasize the understanding of the extensible hypertext markup language, CSS and WYSIWYG editors to create web sites. Students will manipulate graphics to achieve professional-level results to exploit the personal computer’s ability to present information through the internet. Advanced level.

  
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    IT 652 - Advanced Computer Graphics


    3 Credit(s)

    Students will produce computer graphics and integrate them into various computer applications. Topics include producing graphics, storyboarding, animation, resolution, commercial graphics, and integration of graphics into print and the world wide web. Intermediate level - not an introductory course.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of ICT Department.
  
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    IT 655 - Video Design & Production


    3 Credit(s)

    This course uses hands-on projects to introduce students to the three phases of video production: storyboarding and scripting, video capture, and video editing. Both live video capture and motion screen capture are covered. Summer.

  
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    IT 656 - Multimedia Production


    3 Credit(s)

    This course involves students in practical training in multimedia production. An emphasis is placed on the integration of a variety of delivery systems in the production of instructional products. Students will examine the use of a variety of media, including audio, video, text, and graphics to produce instructional multimedia products.

    Prerequisite(s): one technology course with approval of adviser; also recommended: IT 621 or IT 652 . Advanced level.
  
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    IT 669 - Project Development


    3 Credit(s)

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge that they have acquired from other courses in the management program into one complete project. Working from an approved plan, students will produce a project specific to their needs. Class meetings will provide students the opportunity to share work in progress and elicit and provide feedback from their colleagues and the instructor. Taken in final semester of coursework.


Interdisciplinary Studies

  
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    @INTD 491 - Internship


    .5-12 Credit(s)


Italian

  
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    ITAL 101 - Contemporary Italian Language I


    3 Credit(s)

    This course emphasizes spoken Italian and will concentrate on acquisition of an authentic accent. Extensive listening comprehension drills are a regular feature of the class. Italian language video clips and comic strips will provide variety and will serve as meaningful complements to the basic text. As warranted.

  
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    ITAL 102 - Contemporary Italian Language 2


    3 Credit(s)

    Sequel to ITAL 101 . This course emphasizes spoken Italian and will concentrate on acquisition of an authentic accent. Extensive listening comprehension drills are a regular feature of the class. Italian language video clips and comic strips will provide variety and will serve as meaningful complements to the basic text.

    Prerequisite(s): ITAL 101 .
  
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    ITAL 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    ITAL 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    ITAL 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    ITAL 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    ITAL 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    ITAL 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    ITAL 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    ITAL 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Latin

  
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    LATN 101 - Elementary College Latin 1


    3 Credit(s)

    Introduction to Latin. Students will learn to read classical Latin passages, many of which will be from authentic Roman writers of the Golden Age of Latin literature. The selections will be a medium by which historical events and social aspects of the period can be examined. The course will introduce the basics of Latin grammar and its influence on the development of the Romance languages. Students will come to appreciate how Latin is alive and well in the extensive etymological roots of English vocabulary. Some time will be spent on deciphering ancient inscriptions as well as recognizing mottos and other uses of Latin in our society. Students will use Sharpley’s Beginner’s Latin text (from the Teach Yourself Language series} with audio cassettes and also Unit I of the Cambridge Latin Course. Every fourth semester.

  
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    LATN 102 - Elementary College Latin 2


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will build upon the bases of the Latin language learned in Latin 101 and introduce further grammatical constructions such as indirect statements and questions, the passive voice, relative pronouns, the subjunctive and other syntactical constructions necessary for developing a reading knowledge of Latin. The cultural content will focus on Britain and Alexandria during the first century A.D. during the Pax Romana. Students will examine, through readings with a rural Romano-British background and a cosmopolitan Alexandrian setting, the various provincial aspects of Roman life of both the conquered and the conquerors in various social and economic positions. Relevant study of some archeology, epigraphy, and historical events from this time period will be incorporated, as well as other influences of the Romans and the Latin language upon our cultural heritage. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): LATN 101 .
  
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    LATN 103 - Elementary College Latin 3


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: ML credit.
    ith further work from Wheelock’s Latin Grammar online. The focus will be on developing strategies for handling a variety of sight passages for comprehension and translation that might be used to demonstrate a “reading knowledge of Latin” as part of a graduate program in classical archaeology, anthropology or art. Background information on Roman culture and civilization will continue to be incorporated to enhance understanding of the literature being examined. Every fourth semester.

    Prerequisite(s): LATN 102 .
  
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    LATN 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    LATN 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    LATN 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    LATN 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    LATN 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    LATN 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    LATN 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    LATN 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Liberal Arts Education

  
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    EDLS 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    EDLS 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    EDLS 201 - Principles of Education


    3 Credit(s)

    Provides overview: 1) characteristics and needs of children; 2) goals and objectives of elementary education; 3) nature of knowledge; 4) teaching-learning theories and strategies based upon such theories; 5) educational roles of teachers; 6) attitudes and values to be nurtured and developed; 7) nature of evaluation; 8) nature of curriculum; 9) policies & practices related to school governance & finance; 10) A limited service-learning experience.

  
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    EDLS 207 - Early Childhood Literacy


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI.
    Designed for the Early Childhood/Childhood pre-service teacher, this course prepares future teachers to support language and literacy for children from birth to eight years of age in preschool through second grade school classrooms. To support language and literacy development of culturally and linguistically diverse children, the course emphasizes (1) the use of formative and summative assessment to inform instruction that is linked to New York State English Language Arts Common Core Standards, (2) the implementation of a comprehensive phonics program in classrooms, and the (3) the use of diverse literature in classrooms to engage all children to become lifelong readers and writers. Students in this course are required to enroll in a 1-credit lab to prepare for service as language and literacy mentors for children in the Sheard Literacy Center. Lab Required.  Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): EDLS 201 .
    Corequisite(s): EDLS 207 lab.
  
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    EDLS 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    EDLS 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    EDLS 306 - Literacy Foundations


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC.
    This course is designed for pre-service teachers responsible for teaching literacy skills and abilities to children in grades PK-6. As a literacy methods course, it teaches the whys and hows of developmental literacy based on its historical, cultural, political, and social foundations. Students critically examine traditional and contemporary literature as historically and culturally situated texts reaching all children including English Language Learners. Additionally, students plan and teach an interdisciplinary early literacy project linked to the NYS ELA Common Core Standards using formal and informal literacy assessment tools. This course is part of the Childhood/Early Childhood Education Program’s Block I Field Experience in which students will complete 30+ hours of classroom field experience. It is taught in conjunction with the methods courses Math Methods (EDUC 310 ), Social Studies Methods (EDUC 312 ) and Teaching Special Needs (EDUC 314). Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): EDLS 207 .
  
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    EDLS 307 - Literacy Education in the Arts Disciplines


    3 Credit(s)

    Designed for pre-service teachers of the music, theater, and fine arts in grades PK-12, this course examines the historical, cultural, political and social foundations of literacy and their implications for teaching and acquiring literacy in U.S. schools. In addition, students are prepared to apply techniques of literacy instruction to support the learning of arts content by students from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds. Finally, students explore how diverse forms of text (print, electronic, digital) produce a range of reading, writing, and interpretive demands, challenging traditional definitions of literacy, notions of literacy skill, and students’ literate identities. Fall and Spring.

  
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    EDLS 314 - Teaching Students With Special Needs Grades Birth-6


    3 Credit(s)

    Provides an overview of the educational, psychological and social needs of learners with disabilities including students with autistism, discusses the impact of special education law on the public school program, and provides background for designing appropriate interventions for students with diverse learning needs. Includes 15 hours of field-based experience. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): EDLS 201  & EDLS 207 .
    Corequisite(s): EDLS 306  and @EDUC 308  and @EDUC 310  and @EDUC 312 .
  
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    EDLS 315 - Teaching Students With Special Needs: Grades 5-12


    3 Credit(s)

    Provides an overview of the educational, psychological and social needs of learners with disabilities including students with autism in the middle and secondary school; discusses the impact of special education law on the public school program; provides background for designing appropriate interventions for students with diverse learning needs. Includes 15 hours of field-based experiences. Fall and Spring.

  
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    EDLS 320 - Education, Research, Assessment & Evaluation


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to increase educators’ awareness and practice with educational research and the major methods of techniques of assessment used to measure and improve early childhood, elementary, middle and secondary student achievement of learning outcomes. Focus areas will include historical, cultural, analytical, evaluative, theoretical and conceptual treatment of educational assessment. Applications will include: research to inform instruction; assessing and tracking growth and reporting academic achievement for all types of learners; use of technology; and the interpretation of standardized test information. Fall and Spring.

  
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    EDLS 333 - Education, Language, and Culture


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines various constructs of the notions of “language” and “culture” in the educational context, the relationship between them, their effect on identity, values, and beliefs as well as their interplay in schools, communities, and society, both in the US and the world. It emphasizes language and culture as a means for knowledge building and explores how social categories relevant to education are linguistically, culturally, and institutionally constructed. The issues are addressed through an interdisciplinary framework, using insights from a variety of fields, including education, behavioral and social sciences, and the arts.

  
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    EDLS 349 - Introduction to Middle and Secondary School Education


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to introduce prospective teachers to middle and secondary schools. Students will learn about the history of middle and secondary education in the United States. They will be introduced on an interdisciplinary basis to philosophies of education, the roles of schools in society including science, technology, society and health and drug education, the organization of schools, curriculum development and assessment. Students will begin to develop their own philosophies of education.

  
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    EDLS 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    EDLS 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    EDLS 414 - Student Teaching Seminar


    2 Credit(s)

    Discussion of contemporary educational and professional issues. Accompanies student teaching semester. Attendance and interview attire at professional development workshops is mandatory.

  
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    EDLS 415 - Seminar: Issues in Theatre Education


    2 Credit(s)

    Discussion of contemporary educational and professional issues. Accompanies student teaching semester. Attendance and interview attire at Professional Development Workshop is mandatory. Theatre Education majors only.

    Prerequisite(s): DRAM 361  & DRAM 362 .
    Corequisite(s): @EDUC 419  and @SECD 457 .
  
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    EDLS 421 - Seminar in Middle/Junior and Secondary School Education


    2 Credit(s)

    Discussion of contemporary educational and professional issues. Accompanies student teaching semester. Attendance and interview attire at professional development workshops is mandatory.

  
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    EDLS 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    EDLS 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Linguistics

  
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    LNGS 110 - Exploring Language


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: FW credit.
    We are, in undeniable ways, what we speak! Language lies at the heart of who we are and what we might be and informs our conceptions of reality. In this course we begin to explore not only how human beings manipulate language, but also how they are manipulated by it. Throughout the semester we will employ not only serious reading on scholarly questions, but also fiction, poetry, and film to define language, explore language as a human attribute, and investigate the role of language in defining us as social beings. Cross-listed as ANTH 160 . Yearly.

  
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    LNGS 111 - Origins of Language


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: FW credit.
    Perhaps no aspect of our behavior appears so uniquely human as language. But when did language appear? How is human language different from the communication of other creatures? How is the appearance of language related to tool use, evolving social structure, abstract thought, and self-awareness? Is there evolutionary continuity between animal and human minds? Recognizing that it is unlikely that a single factor is, in itself, responsible for the evolution of language, this course draws on research from such diverse areas as linguistics, biological anthropology, archaeology, cultural anthropology, psychology and neurology to explore ways of answering these questions. Cross-listed as ANTH 161 . Yearly.

  
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    LNGS 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    LNGS 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
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    LNGS 203 - Language and Culture


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA & XC credit.
    An introduction to language as a tool in the analysis and description of human populations and their behavior, and a study of the ways in which languages, cultures, and people relate to one another. As warranted.

  
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    LNGS 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    LNGS 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
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    LNGS 301 - Language and Structure


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores the structures of sounds, words and phrases. Analyzes the evolution of structural differences among Old, Middle, and Modern Englishes. Examines behaviorism and universal grammar and their implications for the acquisition of language. Yearly.

  
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    LNGS 302 - Language and Meaning


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores the meaning of words, sentences, symbolic systems, and how people use language. Includes discussions about linguistics reference (literal meaning, metaphor, implication), speech acts and conversation analysis, and semiotics. As warranted.

  
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    LNGS 309 - History of the English Language


    3 Credit(s)

    Presents the historical development of English in such a way as to emphasize the interaction between the internal history of the language (phonological and grammatical evolution) and the external history (ambient social and intellectual factors). As warranted.

  
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    LNGS 310 - American English Grammar


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the grammatical structure of American English, distinguishing between the constitutive rules of grammar and the prescriptive rules of usage. As warranted.

  
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    LNGS 320 - Theories of Language


    3 Credit(s)

    Surveys major issues in Western approaches to language as they are developed in the work of Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Saussure, Skinner, Sapir, Austin, Chomsky, and others with particular attention to how these theories contribute to contemporary discussions about language and its relation to symbolic systems, linguistic structures and change, the mind/brain problem, human behavior and interaction, rhetoric, first and second language acquisition, and aesthetics. As warranted.

 

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