Aug 14, 2022  
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog 
    
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


@ = Indicates a non-liberal arts course. Please refer to College Credit Policies  for a description of non-liberal arts credits.

 

Finance

  
  •  

    FINA 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    FINA 410 - Investments and Portfolio Analysis


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides an introduction to various investment possibilities for both institutional and individual investors with a concentration on the use of portfolios and diversification for risk management. Topics include job-related investments such as 401Ks, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and real estate with an emphasis on valuation theory and modeling. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): FINA 301 .
  
  •  

    @FINA 460 - Financial Statement Analysis


    3 Credit(s)

    This course focuses on the use of corporate financial statements in the analysis of past, present, and expected future financial performance. Topics include industry analysis, accounting analysis, ratio analysis, forecasting, valuation models, and mergers and acquisitions. Emphasis is placed on case analysis. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): FINA 301 .
  
  •  

    @FINA 491 - Internship


    1-12 Credit(s)

    The internship is a combination of academic study and work experience in an organization. A qualified student will work part-time or full-time at a private or public institution. A faculty member in the Department of Business Administration will supervise the academic project, while a supervisor at the work site will monitor the work experience. Either an instructor or the student may initiate the type of work. No more than six credit hours may be counted toward the major. Junior standing at the time of internship required. For application deadlines and more information, see your adviser. Fall and Spring.

  
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    FINA 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    FINA 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


First Year Programs

  
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    FY 100 - First Year Success Seminar


    2 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to accelerate students’ transition to SUNY Potsdam. FYSS provides students with the opportunity to become integrated into the life of the campus by exploring the academic standards of the College, learning to manage their academic progress, and, most importantly, making a connection with the College, its faculty, staff and students. In addition, FYSS provides support for first year students by exploring problems and issues common to the first-year experience.

  
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    FY 150 - Metaskills


    1 Credit(s)

    This is an eight-week course designed to assist students with study skills and developing a sense of responsibility for their education.

  
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    @FY 190 - Academic Support Recitation


    1 Credit(s)

    This course serves to complement existing courses by building a student’s skill level and content understanding in a small group format. This course is for new EOP/Bridges Freshmen only.

  
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    FY 215 - Career Development


    1 Credit(s)

    This course allows students to explore career interests and skills, research occupational and graduate school information and set objectives. The course is particularly aimed at sophomore students who are undeclared, but is appropriate for any student who is uncertain about his or her career path.


French

  
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    FREN 101 - Contemporary French Language I


    3 Credit(s)

    Emphasis on spoken language. Designed for students with no prior study of French. Fall and Spring.

  
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    FREN 102 - Contemporary French Language II


    3 Credit(s)

    Sequel to FREN 101 . Fundamentals of reading French stressed in addition to speaking and listening. Fall and Spring.

  
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    FREN 103 - Contemporary French Language III


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: ML credit.
    Sequel to FREN 102  and entry-level course for students with prior study of French. Emphasis on basic grammatical concepts and reading techniques. Fall and Spring.

  
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    FREN 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    FREN 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    FREN 202 - French for Business


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: ML credit.
    Linguistic preparation and communication practice for the business world. Writing includes C.V., letters of request, ads and business report writing.

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 102 .
  
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    FREN 203 - Oral and Written French I


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: ML credit.
    Initial course in major sequence. Emphasis on expanding vocabulary, learning to write correctly in French and review of grammar. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 103  or four years of high school French required.
  
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    FREN 213 - Intermediate Conversation


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: ML & SI credit.
    Designed to increase fluency. Emphasis on comprehension of spoken French and developing strategies for conversation. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 103  or four years of high school French required.
  
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    FREN 220 - French Phonetics and Diction


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: ML credit.
    Detailed analysis of the sound system of French, combined with extensive oral performance practice. Spring, even years.

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 103  or three years of high school French, or instructor permission required.
  
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    FREN 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    FREN 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    FREN 301 - Oral and Written French II


    3 Credit(s)

    Advanced grammar and syntax in francophone cultural contexts. Sequel to FREN 203 . Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 203 .
  
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    FREN 303 - Contemporary France


    3 Credit(s)

    Evolution of French nation. Attention to social structures, ideas and attitudes. Every fourth semester.

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 203 .
  
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    FREN 304 - Contemporary Quebec


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Evolution of New France into modern Province of Quebec. Emphasis on period since the Quiet Revolution. Attention to current social structures, ideas and attitudes, linguistic features and cultural achievements, as well as to Quebec’s relations with France, English Canada and the United States. Every fourth semester.

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 203 .
  
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    FREN 315 - French Composition


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Builds proficiency in use of written French. Correspondence and original expression through intensive short text reading and writing. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 203  and FREN 301 .
  
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    FREN 325 - French Literature and Thought I


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    French literature from Middle Ages to French Revolution. Techniques of literary analysis. Emphasis on study of literary genres. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 203  and FREN 301 .
  
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    FREN 326 - French Literature and Thought II


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Principal writers, genres and schools from modern day to 1960. Methods in modern literary criticism. Emphasis on the study of literary genres. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 203  and FREN 301 .
  
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    FREN 350 - North African Literatures and Cultures


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC & XC credit.
    Examination of “plurality” in Maghrebine cultures. Exploration of the historical, literary and culture perspectives. Every fourth semester.

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 203  and FREN 301 .
  
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    FREN 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    FREN 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    FREN 410 - French Translation


    3 Credit(s)

    Varieties of written and spoken French at theoretical level. Applications in technology, business, politics, economics and others. Even years

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 315 .
  
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    FREN 461 - French Literature I: Origins - 1700


    3 Credit(s)

    Authors from Middle Ages, 16th and 17th centuries. Specific topics and readings determined each semester. Even years

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 325  and FREN 326 .
  
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    FREN 462 - French Literature II: 1700 - Present


    3-9 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Authors from 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Specific topics and readings determined each semester. Even years

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 315  or FREN 325 , or FREN 326 .
  
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    FREN 483 - Structure of the French Language


    3 Credit(s)

    Development from Latin to modern vernacular. Analysis of contemporary language using linguistic concepts. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 301 .
  
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    FREN 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    FREN 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Geology

Note: Some Geology courses include or require co-registration with a laboratory component. See descriptions for details.

  
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    GEOL 101 - Environmental Geology


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SP & LB credit.
    A study of geology and the human environment. Topics begin with the basics of geology: minerals and rocks, the earth’s internal structure, earthquakes, volcanoes and plate tectonics. Surface processes affecting the environment include stream behavior and flooding, groundwater, and air pollution. The course examines laws governing the extraction and use of water, as well as energy sources and environmental concerns. Laboratory includes field trips in the Potsdam area and the use of geological and topographic maps. Lab required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    GEOL 102 - Ancient Life


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SP credit.
    This is a survey course designed to describe the countless forms of organisms that have lived on the Earth since it formed 4.6 billion years ago. We will explore how and why those organisms evolved and why many went extinct, and also the ecological interactions between organisms with the physical environment. Other major topics are: understanding evolution, tracing evolutionary relationships, and interpreting the behavior of extinct organisms. Fall.

  
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    GEOL 103 - Physical Geology


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SP & LB credit.
    Minerals, rocks, rock deformation, maps, geological processes that shape the land, environmental geology. Lab required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    GEOL 125 - Earth Systems


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SP & LB credit.
    This course provides an overview of Earth Science from a systems approach that focuses on the interaction of the major spheres: the lithosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. Topics covered include Earth materials, Earth history, plate tectonics, volcanism, geomorphology, hydrology, meteorology, climate, and energy. Required field trip in northern New York. Lab required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    GEOL 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    GEOL 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    GEOL 200 - Historical Geology


    1 or 3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: LB & SP credit.
    Historical Geology is the second course in the geology sequence and builds upon the basic geologic principles introduced in 100-level courses. The first half of the course focuses on the methods and principles that geologist use to interpret Earth History; second half of the course focuses on Earth systems history (climate, oceans, atmosphere, geologic processes and life). Lab required. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101   or GEOL 103  or GEOL 125 .
  
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    GEOL 201 - Field Methods in Geology


    2 Credit(s)

    A comprehensive survey of standard geological field techniques and data analysis. Field-intensive. $55 lab fee assessed by Geology Department. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101   or GEOL 103  or GEOL 125 .
  
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    GEOL 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    GEOL 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    GEOL 301 - Sedimentary Geology


    4 Credit(s)

    Study of sediment transport and deposition, classification and description of clastic and carbonate sedimentary rocks, depositional environments, and an introduction to stratigraphy (emphasis is on lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and sequence stratigraphy). Mandatory weekend field trip to southern New York. Lab required. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 200 .
  
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    GEOL 302 - Principles of Paleontology


    4 Credit(s)

    Topics covered in this class include: paleoecology, systematics, evolutionary development, functional morphology, biogeography, diversity, and extinction. Labs focus on invertebrate organisms and their use as environmental indicators and in stratigraphic correlation. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 301  or instructor permission for Biology majors or minors required. Lab required. GEOL 204 .
  
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    GEOL 306 - Geology of our National Parks


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SP credit.
    Study of geologic processes using national parks as examples. Processes studied include sedimentology, stratigraphy, volcanology, glaciology, cave formation and tectonics. National parks studied include Grand Canyon, Arches, Mt. Rainier, Zion, Canyonlands, Badlands, Yosemite, Hawaii Volcanoes, Glacier, Yellowstone, Grand Tetons, Carlsbad Caverns, Mammoth Caves, Acadia and Shenandoah. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101 , GEOL 103  or GEOL 125 .
  
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    GEOL 311 - Mineralogy & Optical Mineralogy


    4 Credit(s)

    This course focuses on (1) The identification, classification and study of minerals and mineral groups with an emphasis on crystal chemistry, symmetry, and the geologic conditions under which they form, and (2) the theory of light behavior in minerals and its application to study rocks and minerals in thin section using petrographic microscopes. Field trips to the St. Lawrence Valley and Adirondack Mountains. Lab required. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101 , or GEOL 103 , or GEOL 125  and CHEM 105 .
  
  •  

    GEOL 320 - Geochemistry


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is intended as an introduction to the broad range of concepts and applications that fall under the sub-discipline of geochemistry. The course will be divided into sections. First, we will focus on the tools used in geochemistry then the application of those tools to a variety of questions in the ear sciences. Topics covered will include thermodynamics, acid and base equilibria, oxidation-reduction reactions, isotope systems, reactions in aquatic systems, weathering reactions, organic geochemistry, and major global geochemical cycles. This course will cover both high and low-temperature geochemistry, but there will be an emphasis on low-temperature systems. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101   or GEOL 103  or GEOL 125  and CHEM 105 .
  
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    GEOL 350 - Geomorphology


    0-3 Credit(s)

    This course focuses on the origin and development of landforms created by fluvial, glacial, and alluvial processes. In addition, we explore the relationships of landforms to underlying geologic structures and the history of geologic and climatic changes that are recorded by surface features. Landscapes and surface processes are analyzed using air photos and topographic maps, as well as field mapping techniques and geographic information systems. Lab required. $100 lab fee assessed by Geology Department. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101  or GEOL 103  or GEOL 125 .
  
  •  

    GEOL 380 - Climate Change: Past & Present


    3 Credit(s)

    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of climate science, the geologic record of climate change, the tools used to reconstruct past climates, natural and anthropogenic influences on climate, and predictions of future climate change. Particular emphasis is placed on how the atmosphere, oceans, life, geology, and orbital parameters influence climate and the complex interactions/feedbacks between these systems.  As needed

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 200  or GEOL 101  or GEOL 103  or GEOL 125  and CHEM 105 .
  
  •  

    GEOL 395 - Climate Change: Past & Present


    3 Credit(s)

    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of climate science, the geologic record of climate change, the tools used to reconstruct past climates, natural and anthropogenic influences on climate, and predictions of future climate change. Particular emphasis is placed on how the atmosphere, oceans, life, geology, and orbital parameters influence climate and the complex interactions/feedbacks between these systems. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 204  or (GEOL 102  or GEOL 103  and CHEM 105 ).
  
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    GEOL 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    GEOL 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    GEOL 405 - Structural Geology


    4 Credit(s)

    Study of folds, faults and hear zones in the Earth’s crust on macroscopic and microscopic scale. Lab. Field studies in northern New York. Junior or Senior standing required. Lab required. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 200 .
  
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    GEOL 407 - Geophysics


    0-3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: LB, SP, & WI credit.
    Geophysical methods of prospecting: seismic reflection and refraction, gravity and magnetics and electrical resistivity.  Emphasis on fieldwork and computer modeling and processing of data in solving geological and environmental problems. Lecture & Lab. A minimum of Sophomore standing required. Fall and Summer.

  
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    GEOL 410 - Hydrogeology


    1 or 2 Credit(s)

    Study of the abundance, distribution and movement of fresh water in the atmosphere, on the surface, and in the sub-surface. Lab required. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 101   or GEOL 103 , or GEOL 125  and MATH 125 .
  
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    GEOL 411 - Paleoecology


    3 Credit(s)

    In this course, we will apply topics in modern paleoecology to the fossil record. Each topic is introduced through a short lecture then expanded upon using reading assignments from the primary literature. A minimum of Junior Standing required. Spring.

  
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    GEOL 425 - Communicating in Geoscience


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI & WI credit
    This course will introduce students to current research in the geological sciences with the purpose of improving their writing and speaking skills. A common scientific theme will be explored throughout each semester. Reading, discussion, and critique of peer-reviewed publications will provide students with an understanding of the principles and conventions of scientific writing. Students will develop their speaking and writing through a series of weekly writing assignment, class discussions, and a research paper. A minimum of Junior standing required. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 200 or GEOL 204  
  
  •  

    GEOL 440 - Economic Geology


    3 Credit(s)

    Study the genesis and geology of ore deposits including base- and precious-metals, gems, coal, petroleum, and industrial rocks and minerals. Discuss how society uses each material, the environmental implications of doing so, and the remediation steps necessary to minimize the associated environmental impact. Lab required. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 311 .
  
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    GEOL 445 - Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology


    1 or 3 Credit(s)

    Study of origin and evolution and mineralogical composition of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Lab required. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 311 .
  
  •  

    GEOL 452 - Geology of Nova Scotia - Field Trip


    2 Credit(s)

    Students will learn about the geology of Nova Scotia via a mandatory field trip (summer). Field trip involves strenuous hikes over irregular terrain in variable weather. Specific stops include the fossil forests of the Joggins Fossil Cliffs World Heritage Site, Triassic rift basin deposits (desert deposits, dinosaurs, and basalt flows), Mississippian lake deposits with some of the oldest terrestrial tetrapods, an upside down angular unconformity at Rainy Cove, and many others. Following the trip, students may complete a research project (GEOL 453 ) on one of the areas visited. Instructor permission required. As needed.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 204 .
  
  •  

    GEOL 453 - Geology of Nova Scotia - Research


    2 Credit(s)

    This course is the academic follow up to the Geology of Nova Scotia field trip. Students will build upon their field experiences and select a semester-long research topic related to one of the destinations visited on the summer field trip. Students will learn about the fundamentals of research and scientific writing in the geosciences via discussions and exercises that explore plagiarism, citation styles and conventions, the structure of research papers, the peer-review process, style and composition. Final projects include a fully-referenced review paper and a poster presentation.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 452 .
  
  •  

    GEOL 475 - Geology Laboratory Techniques


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Experience in laboratory instruction under supervision and guidance of a faculty member. Instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 204 .
  
  •  

    GEOL 480 - Geology Research


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Original research designed to give practical experience in any area of geology. Open primarily to upper-division geology majors and only on advisement. Research conducted in cooperation with a geology professor. Instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    GEOL 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GEOL 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GEOL 575 - Geology Laboratory Techniques


    1 Credit(s)

    Experience in laboratory instruction under supervision and guidance of a faculty member. Fall and Spring. Graded S*/U*.

    Prerequisite(s): GEOL 204 , Graduate standing and permission.
  
  •  

    GEOL 598 - Tutorial


    3-6 Credit(s)

    Geological study projects generally limited to topics that are not part of the regular course offerings.

    Prerequisite(s): departmental approval.
  
  •  

    GEOL 698 - Geology Research


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Original research designed to give practical experience in any area of geology. The student, under advisement, must present a research proposal in writing to the supervising professor. If approved, the research must be conducted in close cooperation with one or more graduate faculty members in geology.


Geographic Info Science

  
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    GISC 101 - Geographic Information Systems


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: LB & SP credit.
    An introduction to the theory and application of geographic information systems. Students will be introduced to the basics of map construction and design, projections and coordinate systems, map scale, raster and vector data, file formats and conversions, and commonly used tools. Students will also be introduced to the GPS systems, Google Earth, and alternate open source GIS tools. Exercises and projects will focus on a variety of issues in the natural sciences and social sciences. Fall and Spring.

    Note: this is a redesigned course that replaces GEOL 340.
  
  •  

    GISC 201 - Cartography


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    The course focuses on the art and science of mapmaking with emphasis on the construction of appealing, appropriate, and cartographically-sound maps in print and digital form. Students will master the concepts of scale, coordinate systems, and map projections and develop a deeper understanding of map design, color, symbology, and typography. Students will explore basic thematic mapping techniques and explore more advanced concepts such as multivariate mapping, geovosualization, and web applications. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): GISC 101 .
  
  •  

    GISC 301 - Data Acquistion & Management


    1 or 3 Credit(s)

    This course provides students with a detailed understanding of the different types of geospatial data, how to create and edit geospatial data, data attributes, metadata, and geodatabase design. Exercise will emphasize the concepts of topology, routes, geocoding, terrain datasets, temporal modeling, and geoprocessing with models and scripts. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): GISC 101 .
  
  •  

    GISC 302 - Remote Sensing


    3 Credit(s)

    An overview of aerial photography, photogrammetry, multispectral remote sensing, thermal remote sensing, LiDAR, and digital image processing. Students will perform a variety of digital image enhancement, manipulation, classification, and analysis techniques and become familiar with the most common applications of remote sensing. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): GISC 101  and GEOL 101  or GEOL 103 .
  
  •  

    GISC 401 - Spatial Problems and Analysis


    4 Credit(s)

    Students will use GIS software to analyze spatial data and solve problems involving a variety of problems in the natural sciences and social sciences. Students will learn about the theories and assumptions of spatial analytic techniques and spatial statistics and be able to select the appropriate analytical tools to complete these tasks. Students will understand the concepts of distance, adjacency, interaction and neighborhood and conduct area and volume measures, surface analysis, spatial pattern analysis, spatial association analysis, and network analysis. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): GISC 301 and MATH 125  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    GISC 450 - Capstone Experience


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    This course is the culmination of the Geographic Information Systems major. It allows students to draw upon their knowledge and technical skills to understand a problem through background research, create and analyze data with GIS technology, and to share their results through oral presentations and a written report. Class projects will vary from year to year; the instructor will act as a liaison between the students and a sponsoring faculty member (could be from any department) that comes up with an issue/project that requires GIS analysis. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): GISC 301 and GISC 401 .
  
  •  

    GISC 480 - GIS Research


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Original research designed to give practical experience in any area of Geographic Information Science. Open primarily to upper-division students and only on advisement. Research is conducted in cooperation with faculty. Instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

  
  •  

    GISC 480 - GIS Research


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Original research designed to give practical experience in any area of Geographic Information Science. Open primarily to upper-division students and only on advisement. Research is conducted in cooperation with faculty. Instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.


Geography

  
  •  

    GEOG 360 - Social Geography


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: XC credit.
    This course introduces the concept of spatial relationships and geographic literacy relative to the Universe (Big Bank to present), Milky Way, Solar System, and the Earth we inhabit.  We will discuss maps and mapping, tectonics, volcanoes and other geological events that have shaped human history and culture.  This course will review key cultural, economic, political, linguistic, musical and historical connections to geographic realms within a global context.  A brief history of human origins and key events that led to human evolution will be introduced with discussion of the nature of humankind, the origins of, and role of, culture, using specific examples drawn from cultures from around the globe. We will be comparing and contrasting the effects of global market economies, environmental impacts, population trends, racism, religious diversity, urbanization and other issues within a cross-cultural context. Fall and Spring.


German

  
  •  

    GERM 101 - Contemporary German Language I


    3 Credit(s)

    1. Encounter the German language as spoken and written currently. 2. Encounter the German national culture (i.e., the facts of collective society in Germany), and other cultures of the German-speaking world as existing currently. 3. Examine a restricted body of German linguistic and cultural data: sounds, words, language and behavior structures, symbol systems. 4. Practice manipulating these data to communicate in speech (talking and listening) and writing (composing and reading). As warranted.

  
  •  

    GERM 102 - Contemporary German Language II


    3 Credit(s)

    This is the second class in the Contemporary Language sequence.  This class continues the development of basic language proficiencies with a focus on the past tense and other basic grammatical structure.  The course will familiarize students with a range of prominent culture items pertaining to the German Culture.

  
  •  

    GERM 103 - Contemporary German Language III


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: ML credit.
    This is the third class in the Contemporary German Language sequence.  This class continues the development of basic language proficiencies with a focus on the future and the subjunctive and other advanced grammatical structures.  The course will familiarize students a style of prominent cultural items pertaining to the German Culture. Every third semester.

  
  •  

    GERM 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GERM 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GERM 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GERM 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GERM 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GERM 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GERM 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GERM 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Graduate Education

  
  •  

    GRED 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GRED 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GRED 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GRED 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GRED 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GRED 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GRED 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    GRED 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

 

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