Sep 28, 2022  
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog 
    
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


@ = Indicates a non-liberal arts course. Please refer to College Credit Policies  for a description of non-liberal arts credits.

 

Communication

NOTE: Upper-division COMM courses require either introductory COMM course or permission of the instructor.

  
  •  

    COMM 324 - Persuasive Speaking


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Developing, delivering and evaluating persuasive speeches. Fall and Spring.

  
  •  

    COMM 325 - Professional Speaking


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    This course is professional preparation. The central focus is on the role of public speaking in business and industry. As warranted.

  
  •  

    COMM 330 - Media Research Methods


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is grounded in mediated communication research and its applications to business and professional communication situations. A variety of analytical methods will be used to illuminate communication events. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 106  or COMM 108 .
  
  •  

    COMM 333 - Interracial Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to address the complications of communicating between and among persons from different racial backgrounds. This course is discussion oriented, allowing students to engage the textbook as well as negotiate, in class, those difficult and sensitive discussions of race. The final project will be the creation and implementation of a campus forum on the benefits and dangers of interracial communication. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 105  or COMM 106  or COMP 101 .
  
  •  

    COMM 340 - Public Relations


    3 Credit(s)

    Designed to acquaint students with the theory, history, and practice of public relations and to provide practical research, planning and analysis exercises. After studying the public relations process, major publics, and institutional public relations, ethical and legal restrictions are considered. Yearly.

  
  •  

    COMM 350 - Family Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA & WI credit.
    An investigation into family communication. The family is a unique context for communication, in part because family membership is involuntary for most of us, in part because families are fascinating minicultures with unique histories, communication codes, and social realities whose grip on members is strong and enduring. Yearly.

  
  •  

    COMM 360 - Folklore and Communications


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores folklore as a fundamental part of the human experience by interpreting texts and performances in their sociological contexts. Engages in ethnography and field collections to document contemporary cultural communications. Offered yearly, Summer Session; Distance Learning.

  
  •  

    COMM 361 - Ethnography in the Digital Age


    3 Credit(s)

    This course explores the role of ethnography in documenting human interaction in the twenty-first century. In particular, the course examines folk culture in the 21stcentury, ethnography as a participatory means of observing cultural practices, and the application of ethnographic fieldwork techniques in both the physical world and the online medium.

  
  •  

    COMM 370 - Contemporary Political Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    An examination of domestic (U.S.) politics in order to understand better how ‘political reality’ is constructed through communication. To that end, the course will examine communication during particular political events, acts of governance, and particular campaigns. Yearly.

  
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    COMM 372 - Rhetoric of the Black Church


    3 Credit(s)

    This course explores from a rhetorical standpoint the roles and impact of Black churches in and on U.S. societies. Particular attention will be paid to the multiple and unique methods of preaching, praying, speaking and singing found in U.S. Black churches. Finally, we focus a great deal of our efforts on understanding church-led social movements in the United States. As warranted.

  
  •  

    COMM 375 - Environmental Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    In relation to an era of mounting environmental crisis, this course examines how we use language to construct, describe, and test environmental issues, and to consider how rhetoric can help to resolve environmental disputes. To understand how environmental communication that addresses a broad public audience must draw upon the rhetorical resources of more than one kind of discourse, the genres considered will range from scientific studies and public policy documents to journalism, nonfiction essays, and word-and-image rhetoric in film, graphic arts, and commercial advertisement. As warranted.

  
  •  

    COMM 390 - Topics in Communication


    1-4 Credit(s)

    Various topics and inquiries not covered by regular course offerings. Topic and prerequisites determined by instructor. Students may elect to take this course again for credit each time a different topic is offered. As warranted.

  
  •  

    COMM 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    COMM 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
  •  

    COMM 408 - Visual Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    In this approach to visual communication, relevant concepts (artistic, communicative, psychological and semiological) are applied to understand how our minds process images and how we create meaning through visual phenomena. Through various exercises and activities, we sharpen our awareness and develop our analytical abilities in our pursuit of visual literacy. As warranted.

  
  •  

    @COMM 412 - Journalism Internship


    2-9 Credit(s)

    Advanced reporting and feature-writing with local newspaper (upon availability). Permission from department chair required. Fall and Spring.

  
  •  

    COMM 415 - Rhetoric of Social Movements


    3 Credit(s)

    Inquiry into and exploration of the formation, performance, and dynamics of social movements, with a focus on the available means of persuasion. As warranted.

  
  •  

    COMM 416 - Voices of American Women


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    The course considers how history is revealed in women’s public discourse as well as how our history may have been shaped by that discourse. Major foci include: 1) Early America: Winning the Right to Speak, 2) 19th Century Reform Movements, 3) Woman Suffrage, 4) The Depression and World Wars, 5) The Contemporary Women’s Movement. Every other year.

  
  •  

    COMM 417 - Women/Men and Elections


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AH credit.
    This class acquaints students with important issues dealing with women, politics, and public communication. The goal of this course is to engage students in a discussion of the variety of ways gender issues intersect with American politics in terms of leaders, voters, and the symbolic roles of women. As warranted.

  
  •  

    COMM 430 - Employment Seeking and Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    This seminar examines the communication (both theory and skills) utilized in employment seeking. The premise of the course is that success or failure in this important endeavor depends on communication strategies. We begin with finding and researching current jobs. We then move to theories of interpersonal communication and persuasion as they apply to cover letters, thank you letters, resumes and interviews. Offered as SI during Winter and Summer Sessions only. Yearly.

  
  •  

    COMM 445 - Intercultural Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: XC & SI credit.
    An introduction to the study of culture, human communication and the special challenges of intercultural communication. Students also have the opportunity to apply intercultural communication models and theories in a variety of ways. Yearly.

  
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    COMM 455 - Organizational Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    Introduces students to an advanced level of communication theory, as well as organizational theory and its implications for communication as it occurs in organizations. FW or equivalent required. As warranted.

  
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    COMM 460 - Language and Social Interaction


    3 Credit(s)

    The study of research and theory in language as it is used by communicators in social contexts. The course will focus on that most ubiquitous form of communication, ordinary conversation, examining it from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Cross-listed with LNGS 412 . As warranted.

  
  •  

    COMM 465 - Communication Theory


    3 Credit(s)

    A high-level and demanding examination of theoretical perspectives in the discipline of communication. Yearly.

  
  •  

    COMM 470 - African American Rhetoric


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    This course has a dual focus. First, it is an examination of the rhetorical strategies employed by African Americans from the early 19th century to the present. This examination covers the chronological span from Nat Turner (1800 - 1831) to Louis Farrakhan. Second, an analysis of the rhetorical strategies employed, using methods of rhetorical criticism ranging from neo-Aristotelian criticism to Burkeian analysis. As warranted.

  
  •  

    COMM 475 - Research Methods in Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    An investigation into research methods used by social scientists in the study of communication. Further investigation into research methods used by practitioners in the communication industry. The focus of the course is on quantitative methods. As warranted.

  
  •  

    @COMM 490 - Public Relations Internship


    3 Credit(s)

    Integration of communications concepts and methodology through research, administrative, or production work with various local agencies and offices under the supervision of faculty. Subject to availability of positions. Instructor permission and preparatory coursework appropriate to internship experience required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    COMM 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    COMM 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
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    COMM 595 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    COMM 598 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.


Community Health

Where possible, the academic term the course is generally taught has been provided. For courses where no specific term of teaching is provided, students should contact the chair of the department, the Center for Graduate Studies or their adviser for guidance.

  
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    @HLTH 478 - Seminar: Fitness Minor


    2 Credit(s)

    Exploses Fitness minors to programs or agencies. Students gain experience developing or working on a fitness project. Fitness minors only. Fall, Spring & Summer.

    Prerequisite(s): PE 305   or EXSC 305  and HLTH 165  and HLTH 333  and HLTH 425 .
  
  •  

    HLTH 520 - Current Topics in Rural Health


    3 Credit(s)

    The course will examine current topics in rural health, including challenges unique to the delivery of health education services to underserved, rural populations around the globe. Focus will be on lessons learned from community strategies aimed at developing solutions to the problems of access and equity in these locations. Fall.

  
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    @HLTH 530 - School Health (CA, SAVE, DASA)


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines signs of child maltreatment and related reporting requirements for teachers; signs warning of violent behavior in students, regulations related to providing a safe, nonviolent school climate, strategies for promoting a nonviolent school climate and strategies for intervening appropriately with students exhibiting or at risk of engaging in violent behavior; fire safety and prevention, drug abuse prevention and child abduction prevention; and behaviors affecting the current and future health of school-aged children and adolescents. The course also explores coordinated school health programs, current health education standards and health-related challenges and controversies schools are facing. Fall, Spring. Also typically offered during Winter and Summer Sessions.

  
  •  

    HLTH 560 - Environmental & Occupational Health


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is an introduction to the environmental (physical, chemical, biological) factors influencing health of communities in urban and rural areas as well as in the workplace. Topics focus on municipal water supply and disposal, ambient and indoor air quality, solid and hazardous wastes, food protection, vector control, pesticides, occupational health and safety, risk assessment, risk communication. Spring.

  
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    HLTH 600 - Social/Behavioral Determinants of Health


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides students with an introduction to health education with a focus on theory. Students will examine the behavioral, social, psychological, cultural, economic, and demographic risk and protective factors related to individual and population health and health disparities, especially those affecting rural populations. Students will learn to evaluate and communicate the relative importance of these factors in making health program decisions. Fall.

  
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    HLTH 605 - Biostatistics


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides a general overview of statistical methods commonly used in the analysis of health-related data. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, statistical inference and use of statistical software. Fall.

  
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    HLTH 610 - Epidemiology


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides students with an introduction to epidemiology as the foundation of public health practice. Topics include disease transmission and progression, measures of morbidity and mortality, surveillance, screening, outbreak investigation, etc. Particular attention will be paid to the application of epidemiologic methods in rural communities. Fall.

  
  •  

    HLTH 625 - Research & Assessment


    3 Credit(s)

    In this course, students will examine public health research methods, with a focus on measurement and needs assessment. Students will learn to design, implement and critique studies and to develop, use and assess measures. Spring.

  
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    HLTH 630 - Health Disparities


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will provide students with an overview of how health status varies by SES, race, ethnicity, sexual identity, gender, age, and geographical location. In doing so, focus will be on the determinants of health disparities and public health efforts to improve status of people suffering from them, particularly for those living in rural areas. Fall.

  
  •  

    HLTH 640 - Program Planning


    3 Credit(s)

    Students will learn to plan for the design, development, and implementation of strategies to improve the health of individuals in rural and diverse communities. Topics include use of theory and needs assessment data in planning program strategies, methods and implementation. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): HLTH 600  and HLTH 605 .
  
  •  

    HLTH 645 - Program Evaluation


    3 Credit(s)

    In this course, students will learn to evaluate community-based programs and interventions. Topics include formative and summative evaluation, selecting appropriate outcome measures, designing process and outcome/impact evaluations and data collection, analysis, interpretation and reporting. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): HLTH 605 .
  
  •  

    HLTH 655 - Health Policy & Administration


    3 Credit(s)

    Using a multidisciplinary approach, this course examines organizational and public policy issues that influence the operation and outcomes of public health and health care services. Emphasis will be placed on influencing, formulating, and advocating for social and organizational policies that are culturally relevant and evidence-based. Students will learn the unique needs of public health and healthcare systems operating in rural areas. Spring.

  
  •  

    HLTH 660 - Professional Development Seminar


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to prepare graduate students in Community Health majors to select their internships and professional project sites for the following year. The course will include responsibilities as an intern, navigating the IRB process, putting together a professional project committee, with significant emphasis on student research/preparation for working with host sites for professional projects. Students must take this course the semester prior to the start of their internship and professional projects. Community Health graduate students only. Spring.

  
  •  

    HLTH 690 - Internship I


    3 Credit(s)

    Under the guidance of the Internship Coordinator, students are placed in a public health organization or agency relevant to their specific needs and interests. Experiences may focus on research, planning, implementation, evaluation, or policy/administrative activities. Fall, Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 24 hours with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the M.S. program.
  
  •  

    HLTH 691 - Internship II


    3 Credit(s)

    Under the guidance of the Internship Coordinator, students are placed in a public health organization or agency relevant to their specific needs and interests. Experiences may focus on research, planning, implementation, evaluation, or policy/administrative activities.

  
  •  

    HLTH 696 - Professional Project I


    3 Credit(s)

    In this course, students will prepare a public health initiative/program proposal. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): HLTH 520  and HLTH 600  and completion of 24 credit hours with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the M.S. program.
  
  •  

    HLTH 697 - Professional Project II


    3 Credit(s)

    In this course, students will implement and evaluate the proposal they developed in HLTH 696 . Students will prepare to present (orally and in writing) the results of the program or research project to the M.S. faculty committee. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of HLTH 696  & HLTH 645  with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the M.S. program.

Composition

  
  •  

    COMP 101 - Writing and Critical Thinking


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: FW credit.
    Encourages development of writing, critical thinking and the use of information resources. Addresses how language permits communication, shapes thought, and changes through time. Fall and Spring.

  
  •  

    COMP 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    COMP 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
  •  

    COMP 201 - Writing Arguments


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit
    Practice in composing written arguments about complex issues. Attention to research methods. Students match creative thinking about ideas with enhanced clarity in communicating those ideas. Since readers often hold competing views on significant issues, special attention is given to developing rhetorical strategies for reaching those readers. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 101 , LITR 110  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    COMP 202 - Introduction to Creative Writing


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE & WI credit.
    Orients writers to the craft of writing in a variety of genres. Introduces terminology, explores techniques, and fosters a sense of individual voice. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 101 , LITR 110  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    COMP 230 - Introduction to Rhetoric


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WC credit.
    Introduction to Rhetoric provides a basic overview of the traditions, theories, and practices of rhetoric and rhetorical studies. Beginning in Ancient Greece, moving into the current day, we will read both primary texts and analytical or interpretive texts in order to inform our critical and systematic reflection of rhetorics and their histories. The essential purpose of this course is to demonstrate how rhetoric shapes the world(s) in which we live. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 101  or LITR 110 .
  
  •  

    COMP 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    COMP 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
  •  

    COMP 301 - Advanced Research Writing


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Instruction in advanced research, rhetorical strategies, and composition, culminating in a major essay crafted for particular audiences. Introduction to professional portfolio. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201 .
  
  •  

    COMP 302 - Fiction Workshop I


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE & WI credit.
    Training in the writing of fiction, with attention as well to the history and current state of the genre. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 202 .
  
  •  

    COMP 303 - Poetry Workshop I


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE & WI credit.
    Training in the writing of poetry, with attention as well to the history and current state of the genre. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 202 .
  
  •  

    COMP 304 - Technical Writing


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Writing in common formats to inform and to recommend action in business, nonprofit, and technical fields. Principles of design, ethics, and collaboration. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201 .
  
  •  

    COMP 305 - Editing and Revising


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Functions of editors. Editing for print and electronic media. History and theory of editorial practices. Every other year.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201 .
  
  •  

    COMP 306 - Playwriting: Short Plays


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE & WI credit.
    Training in the writing of drama, particularly the one-act play, with attention as well to the history and current state of the genre. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 202 .
  
  •  

    COMP 307 - Creative Nonfiction Workshop I


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE & WI credit.
    Training in the writing of creative nonfiction, with attention as well to the history and current state of the genre. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201  or COMP 202 .
  
  •  

    COMP 308 - Writing Fiction for Children


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE & WI credit.
    e literature for children. While attention is paid to the visual and poetic aspects of Children’s Literature, the focus will be on storytelling. (No illustrative talent required.) Strategies and techniques from both the traditional and contemporary canons will be examined. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 202 .
  
  •  

    COMP 309 - Screenwriting Workshop I


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE & WI credit.
    Training in the writing of screenplays, with attention as well to the history and current state of the genre. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 202 .
  
  •  

    COMP 310 - Playwriting: Full-length Plays


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE & WI credit.
    Training in the writing of drama, particularly full-length plays of either two or three acts with a 75- to 90-minute playing time. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 202 .
  
  •  

    COMP 311 - Writing in a Digital Age


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Production of digital texts. Rhetorical analysis of electronic communication, readings in design theory, and skill-building in technical competencies. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201 .
  
  •  

    COMP 312 - Writing in New Media


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Explorers social and cultural contexts of new media writing and emergent digital writing technologies, and provides a space to analyze, research, and produce writing across social media contexts and platforms. Every other year.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201 .
  
  •  

    COMP 316 - Magazine Article Writing


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Craft of writing compelling magazine articles, and business of marketing them. Students are required to submit one full-length magazine article for publication. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201 .
  
  •  

    COMP 318 - Writing for the Arts


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Practice in the kinds of writing found in the professional art worlds, with careful attention to the ways in which we describe and analyze works of art, dance, theater, fiction, poetry, and music, and how those works are part of an ongoing dialogue with other works, with their viewers, and with society at large. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): or concurrently taking COMP 201 .
  
  •  

    COMP 321 - Writing about the Environment


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Focuses on writing about environmental issues, especially debates currently shaping the Adirondacks and North Country. Resources for analysis include scholarly essays, nonfiction, local news media and journalism, public policy reports, etc. Every other year.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201 .
  
  •  

    COMP 322 - Grant Writing


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Study and practice of grant writing as an example of a genre in professional writing. Examines theories of genre within composition studies, especially concerning the roles of community, writer, and situation in shaping the forms and norms of writing. Every other Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201 .
  
  •  

    COMP 330 - The Rhetoric of Film


    3 Credit(s)

    Rhetorical approach to film analysis, including consideration of narrative, audience, argument, composition, and rhetorical perspective. Films studied will reflect diverse perspectives and genres. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201 .
  
  •  

    COMP 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    COMP 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
  •  

    COMP 401 - Directed Professional Writing


    3 Credit(s)

    Practice in the polishing of a manuscript suitable for publication. This will be a continuation of original work in the genre chosen by each student. Students will research markets and prepare manuscripts accordingly. Non-writing majors concentrate on the discourse and subject matter of t\eir major. Spring.

  
  •  

    COMP 402 - Theory of Composition


    3 Credit(s)

    Examination of composition studies: its pivotal debates, research efforts, disciplinary movements, and pedagogical shifts. A minimum of Junior standing required. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201 .
  
  •  

    COMP 405 - Writing Center Theory


    3 Credit(s)

    Writing Center theory and history, with emphasis on approaches to one-on-one instruction by peer tutors. A minimum of Junior standing required. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 20.
  
  •  

    @COMP 406 - Tutoring Practicum


    1 Credit(s)

    Strategies for responding to peers’ written works in progress, applied as apprentice peer tutors in the College Writing Center. A minimum of Junior standing preferred. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 301 .
  
  •  

    COMP 412 - Fiction Workshop II


    4 Credit(s)

    Advanced training in the writing of fiction. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 302 .
  
  •  

    COMP 413 - Poetry Workshop II


    4 Credit(s)

    Advanced training in the writing of poetry. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 303 .
  
  •  

    COMP 416 - Playwriting Workshop II


    4 Credit(s)

    Advanced training in the writing of playwriting. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 306  or COMP 310 .
  
  •  

    COMP 417 - Creative Nonfiction Workshop II


    4 Credit(s)

    Advanced training in the writing of creative nonfiction. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 307 .
  
  •  

    COMP 419 - Screenwriting Workshop II


    4 Credit(s)

    Advanced training in the writing of screenplays. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 309 .
  
  •  

    COMP 430 - Theory of Rhetoric


    3 Credit(s)

    Study of major theories of rhetoric. Emphasis on the perspectives those theories offer on texts from contemporary U.S. culture. Practice in advanced rhetorical analysis. A minimum of Junior standing required. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201 .
  
  •  

    COMP 490 - Writing Supervision


    3 Credit(s)

    Students in the Creative Writing concentration will, under the supervision of the course instructor, produce a manuscript in a genre of the student’s choosing suitable for publication. Ordinarily, this will be original work that was begun in one of the 300-level writing workshops. While publication, per se, is not a requirement, the student will be expected to research market needs and prepare the manuscript accordingly. In addition, the student will be expected to give a public performance of the edited work. B.A. or B.F.A. Creative Writing majors only. Senior standing required. Fall and Spring.

  
  •  

    COMP 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    COMP 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
  •  

    COMP 505 - Rhetorical Criticism


    3 Credit(s)

    This class aims to develop your critical abilities and sensibilities as a scholar of rhetoric and rhetorical messages in our increasingly information-saturated society. Throughout the semester you will become acquainted with various approaches to rhetorical criticism, survey landmark pieces of criticism produced in the field, and develop your skills as a critic through the application of critical methods to analysis of selected rhetorical artifacts. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201  and junior, senior, or Graduate standing.
  
  •  

    COMP 507 - Theory of Composition


    3 Credit(s)

    Examination of composition studies: its pivotal debates, research efforts, disciplinary movements, and pedagogical shifts. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201  and junior, senior, or Graduate standing.
  
  •  

    @COMP 515 - Writing Center Theory


    3 Credit(s)

    This course highlights theories of writing and collaboration developed in the context of writing center studies and asks students to consider the ways in which insights gained from writing center scholars can impact professional work in multiple settings. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201  and junior, senior, or Graduate standing.
  
  •  

    COMP 530 - Theory of Rhetoric


    3 Credit(s)

    Study of major theories of rhetoric. Emphasis on the perspectives those theories offer on texts from contemporary U.S. culture. Practice in advanced rhetorical analysis. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMP 201  and junior, senior, or Graduate standing.
  
  •  

    COMP 595 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    COMP 598 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature, or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
  •  

    COMP 695 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)


Computer Science

  
  •  

    CIS 105 - Introduction to Computing


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: FM credit.
    An introduction to computing and problem solving, including software productivity tools, computing fundamentals, and an introduction to programming. Laboratory work included. Fall and Spring.

  
  •  

    CIS 125 - Statistics


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: FM credit.
    Variability, uncertainty, description of data, sampling, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression. Not open to students who have completed another entry-level statistics course. High school algebra or equivalent required. As warranted.

  
  •  

    CIS 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    CIS 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    CIS 201 - Computer Science I


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: FM credit, FS credit for course if taken with Recitation option.
    Introduction to computer science and information systems. Data types, control structures, arrays, and objects. Introduction to software engineering. Laboratory required. 1 credit hour FS Recitation option. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 141  or MATH 151  or concurrent registration.
 

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