Sep 28, 2022  
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog 
    
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


@ = Indicates a non-liberal arts course. Please refer to College Credit Policies  for a description of non-liberal arts credits.

 

Graduate English and Communication

Where possible, the academic term the course is generally taught has been provided. All other courses are taught as demand warrants.

  
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    GECD 604 - Professional Writing


    3 Credit(s)

    Practice in writing texts for professional publication in which students refine their understanding of form and style. Projects and readings are shaped by class interests and may include: 1) articles and essays for academic, professional, or mass media, 2) fiction or poetry, 3) technical communications. As warranted.

  
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    GECD 605 - Rhetoric and Society


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines important contributions to rhetorical theory, with particular emphasis on how those theories have influenced contemporary rhetoric. As warranted.

  
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    GECD 606 - Thesis Workshop


    3 Credit(s)

    Students will apply advanced writing and research techniques learned in GECD 601 - Introduction to Graduate Studies  in order to write a literature review and develop a polished draft of thesis proposal, including bibliography and project timeline, for submission. Topics include techniques needed to define an effective research question and methodology, compiling and evaluating sources within specialized field of study, refining scholarly arguments, and effective processes of writing, revising, and eliciting feedback. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): GECD 601 .
  
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    GECD 610 - Theories of Interpretation


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the interpretative methods leading to the perception, interpretation, and understanding of texts. This course explores recent theories of interpretation by literary critics, philosophers, and other scholars. Consideration will also be given to the role of interpretation in students’ writing, speaking, teaching, and research. As warranted.

  
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    GECD 615 - Narratology


    3 Credit(s)

    Narratology is the study of the structural components of a narrative. Drawing upon the works of various theorists-from Russian formalists to French structuralists-this course examines narrative as a distinct system of rules, exploring literary and cultural productions as embodiments of these rules. As warranted.

  
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    GECD 620 - Poetics


    3 Credit(s)

    Poetics is concerned with the principles and rules of poetic composition. This course examines how such principles relate to various rhetorical and aesthetic theories about poetry. As warranted.

  
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    GECD 625 - Psychology and Discourse


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines theories of the human mind and their effects on personal, cultural, and literary constructions. While the specific subject matter may vary, recent topics have included the study of writing as a vehicle for psychological healing; the study of archetypal and myth criticism; and the study of shame-based literature. As warranted.

  
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    GECD 640 - Discourses of Nationalism


    3 Credit(s)

    The purpose of this course is twofold: to explore discourses of nationalism and to examine the role that literary and non-literary texts have played in fostering, complicating, and resisting nationalist sentiments. As warranted.

  
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    GECD 645 - Discourses of Humanism


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the history and development of humanism, its relation to the divine, to the world as a scientifically observable phenomenon, to the individual, and to social and cultural institutions. As warranted.

  
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    GECD 650 - Discourses of Culture


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the varied discourses of culture, with particular attention given to forms of cultural production and networks of cultural dissemination. As warranted.

  
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    GECD 655 - Discourses of Ecology


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the discourse of ecological movements. Particular concerns are the shifts in aesthetic and communicative discourses as they respond to and influence community action, public policy, and scientific inquiry. As warranted.

  
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    GECD 660 - Gender and Identity in Discourse


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the discourse of gender and how such discourse serves to construct, reify, or challenge gender identities. As warranted.

  
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    GECD 680 - Special Topics


    3 Credit(s)

    Topics will vary. Recent courses include Documentary Film, Book History, and Discourses of Science Fiction. As warranted.

  
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    GECD 690 - Thesis Credits


    1-6 Credit(s)

  
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    GECD 695 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)


Greek

  
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    GREK 101 - Intro to Classical Greek


    3 Credit(s)

    Introduction to the study of ancient Greek language. Intended for beginning students. As warranted.

  
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    GREK 102 - Intermediate Classical Greek


    3 Credit(s)

    Continuation of the study of the Classical Greek language course GREK 101. Assumes completion of GREK 101  .


History

  
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    HIST 100 - World History


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: XC credit.
    Applying a cross-cultural, comparative approach to understanding social, political, economic, and cultural developments, this course surveys significant themes in historical development from ancient to modern times. Fall and Spring.

  
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    HIST 101 - Europe from 1500 to 1815


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WC credit.
    Major developments and issues in European history from 1500 to 1815. Fall and Spring.

  
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    HIST 102 - Europe since 1815


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WC credit.
    Major developments and issues in European history from 1815 to present. Fall and Spring.

  
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    HIST 110 - Europe since 1500


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WC credit.
    This hybrid course is a comprehensive, thematically organized overview of European history from the 16th century to the present. It is designed to meet the needs of students in the General Education Program.

  
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    HIST 121 - U.S. History and Geography


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AH credit.
    This course is a comprehensive overview of American history and geography from pre-Columbian times to the present. It is designed to meet the needs of students in the Childhood Education Program. Fall.

  
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    HIST 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    HIST 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    HIST 201 - United States to 1877


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AH credit.
    Major developments and issues in American History to 1877. Equivalent to HIST 203 and 205. Fall and Spring.

  
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    HIST 202 - United States Since 1877


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AH credit.
    Major developments and issues in American History since 1877. Equivalent to HIST 204. Fall and Spring.

  
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    HIST 204 - United States Since 1877


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AH & FW credit.
    Major developments and issues in American History since 1877. Emphasizes writing, reasoning, and research. Equivalent to HIST 202.

  
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    HIST 210 - American Identities in Song


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AH credit.
    This course explores the impact of music on the development of American history since the end of the Civil War, focusing on ways that music helped to define the national identity, as well as the separate identities and struggles of the nation’s myriad population groups as they fought for power and civil rights. Fall.

  
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    HIST 225 - East Asian History


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: XC credit.
    Introduction to the history of East Asia from the emergence of ancient cultures to the present. Its main focus will be on the political, cultural, and social developments of China and Japan, with some attention to Korea and Taiwan.

  
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    HIST 226 - East Asian History


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: FW & XC credit.
    Introduction to the history of East Asia from the emergence of ancient cultures to the present. Emphasizes writing, reasoning and research. Equivalent to HIST 225. Spring.

  
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    HIST 230 - Introduction to Africa


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: Gen. Ed. XC.
    Introduces students to Africa by exploring the continent’s diverse history, geography, politics, and cultures through lectures, novels, and film.

  
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    HIST 240 - Immigrant America


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: Gen. Ed. AH.
    This course takes a cross-cultural approach to American history with a focus on the movement of people, goods, and ideas across national boundaries. Special attention to America’s evolving relationships with Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

  
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    HIST 250 - Sick History of Early America


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: Gen. Ed. AH.
    Charts political, social, and cultural change through the lenses of disease, health, sickness, and healing. Covers up to Reconstruction.

  
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    HIST 252 - Eat: A Global History of Food


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: Gen. Ed. XC
    Surveys the global history of food since 1450, with particular attention to areas outside Europe and the US. Examines the history of various aspects of what has become a global agri-food system, including the economics, politics, technologies, and cultures of food. Surveys the major events from the Columbian exchange to GMOs.

  
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    HIST 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    HIST 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    HIST 302 - Fighting Words: History & Story


    3 Credit(s)

    Introduces majors to the theories and methods that historians employ as they seek to construct plausible and compelling interpretations of the past. Nine credits of history required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    HIST 309 - Colonialism in the Caribbean


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores the impact of race, class, and colonialism on the development of Caribbean society. Examines the political geography of the pre-Hispanic Caribbean, the political and technical developments in the Iberian Peninsula that made colonialism possible, patterns of settlement, the rise of the plantation system, the connections between slavery and capitalism, the birth of African-American culture, the social structure of plantation society, slave resistance, and the process of emancipation. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 310 - Cultures of Mexico & Central America


    3 Credit(s)

    Cultures of Mexico and Central America from conquest to present day. Emphasis on effects of conquest and colonial governmental systems on indigenous cultures. Cross-listed with ANTH 360 . A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 311 - Indians and Iberians


    3 Credit(s)

    A history of Latin American focused on the exchange and transformation of native American and Spanish cultures to form the Hispanic American world. Areas of emphasis will include pre-conquest Spain, pre-Columbian Indian Civilizations, the Spanish conquest, the establishment of a new, cross-cultural society, and the break between Spanish American and Spain up through the 19th century. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 312 - Latin American in the 20th Century


    3 Credit(s)

    Major developments in Latin American history during the 20th century. Country and area studies. U.S. - Latin American relations. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 314 - Vietnam War


    3 Credit(s)

    Origins of the war in Vietnam from the tradition of resistance by the Vietnamese people against foreign intruders and the development of the Cold War in Asia: the war perceived as both a Vietnamese and American experience. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 315 - Modern Japanese Women’s History


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the development of gender roles in Modern Japan, particularly in relation to the economic and political developments of the Tokugawa, Meiji, Taisho and Showa periods, and the various responses those changes evoked among women. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 318 - Pre-modern Japan


    3 Credit(s)

    Covers Japanese history from the prehistoric period to the Tokugawa period, paying particular attention to the development of political institutions, cultural and intellectual trends, and the long-term transformation of the economy and society. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 319 - Modern Japan


    3 Credit(s)

    Traces Japan’s Historical development from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present, exploring the process of modernization, the growth of the imperial state, the Second World War, defeat and occupation, and post-war recovery. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 322 - Ancient Middle East


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the Middle East from 3100 to 332 BC. It is divided into three parts: 1. Mesopotamia; 2. Egypt; and 3. the Holy Land. It presents the region’s political and cultural traditions through primary and secondary sources. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 323 - Middle East: Alexander to Islam


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the Middle East from 332 BC to AD 570. It is divided into three parts: 1. the Hellenistic Age; 2. the advent of the Romans, and 3. the Orient in Late Antiquity. It looks at the influence of Alexander the Great, the spread of Greek culture, Christianity in the East, and the conflict between Rome and Persia. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 326 - Egypt in Late Antiquity


    3 Credit(s)

    Covers Egyptian history from the collapse of the New Kingdom to the Arab Conquest. Major topics include the Saite Renaissance, cooperation and confrontation with Persian, Greek and Roman occupiers, and Coptic Christianity. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 330 - Black Diaspora: 1500 to Present


    3 Credit(s)

    A social, economic, political and cultural survey of the migrations (forced and otherwise) of black Africans to, and between, the Americas and Europe over the past 500 years. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 331 - Africa to 1870


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores African history from the emergence of the earliest human societies through the mid-nineteenth century, with particular focus on the period after 1400. Considers the developments of lineage societies and centralized states, the trans-Saharan trade, the Atlantic slave trade, the spread and influence of religions such as Islam and Christianity, and Africa’s encounters with other parts of the world. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 332 - Africa since 1870


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores modern African history, paying particular attention to imperialism and its impact on African societies and cultures, the rise of nationalist and independence movements, independence and the creation of nation-states, and recent and contemporary politics, society, and culture. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 341 - Colonial American History


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores the history and culture of early America as described by both participants and historians. Considers the development of early American society and culture from 1598 to 1763. Religion, gender, class, social status, economics, war and Native-European relations will be examined. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 342 - Revolutionary America


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores the colonies in the English Atlantic world and the individual and collective decisions to break away from Great Britain. Considers how independence, revolution, and war allowed the former colonies to create a new and fragile Republic. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 351 - Medieval and Renaissance England


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the History of England from the Medieval period through the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, paying special attention to the manorial system. Feudalism, the growth of Parliament, the emergence and structure of the Tudor state, the Protestant Reformation, the rise of Puritanism, and the flowering of Elizabethan culture. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 352 - Revolutionary England


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the history of England from the beginning of the Stuart dynasty to the beginning of Industrialization, paying particular attention to the origins and progress of the Civil War, and Interregnum, the Restoration, the Glorious Revolution, the financial and consumer revolutions, and the movement for reform. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 353 - Renaissance & Reformation


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the intellectual, cultural, religious, social, economic, and political dimensions of two profound transformations in European history: the Renaissance and the Reformation, roughly spanning the years 1350 to 1650. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 354 - The Enlightenment


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines in detail the process by which Enlightenment culture took shape, spread, and evolved during the 18thcentury. Between the publication of Newton’s Principia Mathematica in 1685 and the outbreak of the French Revolution a century later, the political, social, and economic assumptions of European thought were radically revised. This intellectual revolution in turn ushered in new forms of sociability and ultimately new political orders. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 370 - African American History


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores African American History form the end of the Civil War to the 1990s, paying particular attention to the Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. A minimum of Sophomore standing required. Taught once every three semesters.

  
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    HIST 371 - The First World War


    3 Credit(s)

    The causes, course and consequences of the First World War; Origins of the war in imperialism and Balkan nationalism; the July Crisis and war of illusions; total war; revolution in Russia, and the consequences to Europe, the Middle East and the global balance of power. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 372 - Civil War America


    3 Credit(s)

    The Civil War era in history and memory. Emphasis on politics, society, and culture as well as military affairs. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 373 - World War II


    3 Credit(s)

    Causes, events and result of the traumatic watershed in world history. May be European, American or Asian in focus as announced each time it is offered. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 376 - The U.S. in the 1920s & 1930s


    3 Credit(s)

    Domestic issues in the United States from 1919 to 1939. Emphasis on prosperity of the twenties, the Depression and the New Deal. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 377 - The United States Since 1945


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores the history of the U.S., the end of World War II. Examines the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the turbulent 1960s, the political and economic crisis of the 1970s, the Reagan Era, and the politics of personal destruction in the 1990s. It highlights the increasingly close connection between domestic politics and foreign policies affairs, as well as the growing racial and ethnic diversity of the American population. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 378 - Adirondack Environmental History


    3 Credit(s)

    Student research projects explore interrelationships of natural and cultural history in the Adirondack Park, with particular attention to the social, economic, and cultural factors that shape, and reshape, land use over time. The Park as a place constitutionally protected “forever wild” will be considered in the contexts of larger theoretical discussion about wilderness and protection of other American wild places.

  
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    HIST 379 - History of New York State


    3 Credit(s)

    Political, economic and social developments from colonial times to present. Relationship of state history to major issues and events in American life. A minimum of Sophomore standing required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    HIST 387 - History of U.S.S.R.


    3 Credit(s)

    Development of Soviet Union: economic and social developments, political structure, role of Communist Party, expansion of Russian control and influence through the breakup of the Soviet Union. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 388 - Potsdam in Europe


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the development of the Potsdam/Berlin region as a major European center, paying attention to cultural, political, and military affairs. We will analyze themes such as religious tolerance and the Enlightenment, as well as the Nazi and Cold War years. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 389 - Modern Germany: Bismarck to Hitler


    3 Credit(s)

    Modern German history from unification and industrialization to defeat in the First and Second World Wars; the collapse of the Weimar Republic, the rise of the Third Reich, and the division of Germany. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
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    HIST 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    HIST 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    HIST 400 - Honors Thesis I


    3 Credit(s)

    Senior project which demonstrates mastery of skills of historical inquiry, and critical and analytical expertise. The project is begun in the first semester and completed in the second (Honors Thesis II). Instructor permission required.

  
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    HIST 401 - Honors Thesis II


    3 Credit(s)

    Completion of project began in Honors Thesis I. Instructor permission required.

  
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    HIST 402 - Early American Indian History


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores the history of the people who lived, flourished, “adapted, constructed, retreated and resisted” in the North American continent from pre-history through the removal policies of the 1830s. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 419 - U.S. Foreign Relations 1763 - 1901


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the history of U.S. foreign relations, between the conclusion of the Seven Years War in 1763 and the decision of American policy makers to pursue overseas expansion at the end of the 19thcentury. Explores U.S. territorial expansion. Native American and Mexican resistance, the diplomacy of the Monroe Doctrine and the American drive for overseas economic expansion after the Civil War. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 420 - U.S. Foreign Relations 1890-2000


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores the history of U.S. foreign relations from the beginning of the nation’s overseas economic expansion during the 1890s to the present. Investigates the causes and consequences of the major wars fought by the U.S. during the late 19thand 20thcenturies, the origins and effects of the Cold War on U.S. foreign relations, and the impact of economic globalization on the conduct of U.S. foreign policy and on the nation’s domestic politics, society, and economy. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 421 - Race & American Film History


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores the issue of race, broadly defined, in the history of the US cinema. Consideration of relevant contemporary social and cultural issues will supplement close viewing of a number of American films spanning the years from 1915 to the present. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 451 - Witchcraft in Early America


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores witchcraft in early America, paying special attention to the social, religious and gendered contexts of witchcraft and to the legal and cultural dimension of witch-hunting. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 452 - Work in American History


    3 Credit(s)

    Considers diverse workers and work settings of Americans from the 17thcentury to the present. Emphasizes the transforming of work and its relationship to political and economic change, labor movements, and personal or community experiences of work. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 453 - Nature in American History


    3 Credit(s)

    An introduction to North American environmental history. Explores the interaction between human beings and their environment, specifically how that environment shapes human expectations, possibilities, and behavior, and how humans have understood the workings of nature and their appropriate role in it. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 454 - Energy in American History


    3 Credit(s)

    Survey of human life in America that focuses on the role of energy in societies and cultures that have been established here. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 459 - American Victorian Culture


    3 Credit(s)

    Charts the rise, extent, and ultimate eclipse of the “genteel” American tradition in the period between 1815 and 1890, through an exploration of cultural production, reception and consumption. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 461 - Imagining Life Beyond Earth


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines ideas and beliefs about life beyond Earth as expressed in western culture from the ancient Greeks to the present. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 462 - Hero in Classical Antiquity


    3 Credit(s)

    Considers the evolving concept of the hero in classical antiquity, paying particular attention to the transformation of the heroic ideal during the Hellenistic Age and within Christian communities. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 463 - Ancient Magic


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the Egyptian, Greek, and Roman concepts of magic, comparing them with medieval and modern Western ones. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 464 - Technology in History


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the relationship between technologies and societies in history by looking at the place of technology in western civilization, and to a lesser extent, globally since the medieval period. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 465 - Holocaust and History


    3 Credit(s)

    Places the complex developments and events referred to as the Holocaust in the broad context of modern European history. Examines cultural, political and cultural developments in firsthand accounts in classic and contemporary scholarship, and in novels. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 466 - Espionage and the Cold War


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines the dynamics of espionage activity in Europe from the Nazi era to the end of the Cold War. The focus is on why and how Nazi, Soviet and Western intelligence agencies gathered information about each other as well as on ideological, political, economic, and logistical dimensions of reconnaissance work during the period. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 467 - Imagining Asia


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores the ways in which Trans-Pacific migration and trade, war and diplomacy have shaped American society and culture and how race has been seen in deeply generated ways. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 468 - Japanese History Thru Manga


    3 Credit(s)

    Uses Manga and Anime along with Classical Japanese Literature to explore Japanese history. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 470 - African Environmental History


    3 Credit(s)

    Historical examination of Africa’s diverse human and natural environments. Considers interactions between human and natural worlds with issues such as urbanization, agricultural strategies, deforestation, and the role of the supernatural in African environmental knowledge. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
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    HIST 480 - Senior Seminar in History


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Capstone course for the History major. Students design and conduct significant research project and draft significant research paper. History majors only. An upper division course in area of seminar focus required. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 302 .
  
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    HIST 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    HIST 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    HIST 540 - Readings in American History


    3 Credit(s)

    Programs of individual study, designed with the advice of the instructor, on selected topics in American history. (May be taken more than once.)

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or undergraduate seniors.
  
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    HIST 641 - Readings in European History


    3 Credit(s)

    Programs of individual study, designed with the advice of the instructor, on selected topics in European history. (May be taken more than once.)

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or undergraduate seniors.

Inclusive and Special Education

  
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    @SPED 501 - Foundations in Autism


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will address the identification and needs of students with Autism and related spectrum disorders and ongoing assessment techniques for the purposes of designing appropriate teaching strategies and monitoring student progress. It will emphasize exploration of the four main domains of ASD in order to build a successful foundational understanding of the student with autism. Fall.

  
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    SPED 505 - Introduction to Special Education


    3 Credit(s)

    Provides an overview of the categories of disabilities; develops skills related to the identification and remediation of educational, psychological and social needs of learners with disabilities and/or gifted, discusses the special education process and impact of state and federal special education laws and policies on the public school program; provides background for designing appropriate individualized instruction, behavioral support, and classroom management applications and interventions for students with diverse learning needs; and develops and uses effective planning, collaboration, and co-teaching practices with peers. This course also includes 15 hours of fieldwork with persons having disabilities; which with the permission of the instructor might include reported observations and volunteering at special education or identified inclusive settings within the classroom, area school districts, BOCES, or other institutions. This course may be applied to the prerequisite course requirement in the MSEd Special Education program. Fall, Sp, Su.

  
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    SPED 595S - Special Topics


    1-6 Credit(s)

    Workshops, seminars and/or institutes designed to meet needs of teachers, or others interested in initial graduate-level study in the field of special education. Offerings available upon announcement by the School of Education and Professional Studies. Credit earned may be applied, under advisement, as electives in Master of Science in Education/Master of Science for Teachers degree programs.

  
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    SPED 601 - Characteristics of Learners with Mild/Moderate Disabilities


    3 Credit(s)

    Considers the characteristics of learners with mild/moderate disabilities, including those with learning disabilities, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders, mental retardation and emotional behavioral disorders; identifies the commonalities and differences among these disabilities; addresses the philosophy of service to such learners. Fall.

    Corequisite(s): SPED 650 .
  
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    SPED 607 - Educational Research: Critical Issues in Special Education


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will examine foundational research principles and classic and contemporary issues in special education. The principles and methods of qualitative and quantitative empirical research will be coordinated with an active investigation of research studies focused on special educational issues. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): SPED 601 , SPED 609 , SPED 650 .
 

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