Feb 03, 2023  
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog 
    
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


@ = Indicates a non-liberal arts course. Please refer to College Credit Policies  for a description of non-liberal arts credits.

 

Physics

Note about frequency of course offerings: Physical Science is offered each term while the introductory sequences of College and University Physics are offered yearly. Some upper division course are offered yearly; others at intervals of more than a year or “as warranted.”

  
  •  

    PHYS 350 - Einstein’s Relativity


    2 Credit(s)

    Basic principles of special relativity and their application to four-dimensional space-time and particle reactions. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 306  and MATH 152  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    PHYS 355 - Electronics


    4 Credit(s)

    This course involves the study of electronic components and their function in electronic circuits, the application of that information to the design of circuits, and a study of the circuits themselves. Topics include: the theory, design, and function of common passive circuit elements, active discrete and integrated solid state devices, analog, and digital circuits. Lab required. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 306  and MATH 152  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    PHYS 360 - Advanced Physical Laboratory I


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Advanced experimental work in electricity, magnetism, optics, and atomic, nuclear, and solid state physics. Fall or as warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 306 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 361 - Advanced Physical Laboratory II


    3 Credit(s)

    Continuation of PHYS 360 . Spring or as warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 360 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 370 - Mathematical Physics


    3 Credit(s)

    A course that integrates conceptual understanding of physics with mathematical framework. Important topics include differential calculus, integral calculus, complex variables, vector calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations. The emphasis is on learning the mathematical models of important concepts and developing skills to solve problems. Fall or Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 104  and MATH 152 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 386 - Optics and Optical Instrumentation


    3 Credit(s)

    A study of geometrical and wave optics. Topics include: reflection, refraction, dispersion, diffraction, polarization, lenses, mirrors, optical systems, and fiber optics. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 205  and MATH 152  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    PHYS 390 - Nuclear Physics


    3 Credit(s)

    A study of nuclear and particle physics. Topics include: natural and artificial radioactivity, nuclear detection devices, particle scattering, models of the nucleus, and modern developments in particle physics. As warranted.

    Concurrent: PHYS 205  and MATH 152  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    PHYS 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    PHYS 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    PHYS 440 - Physics Laboratory Techniques


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Senior Physics Majors gain experience as supervisors of physics laboratories at various levels and/or serve as interns gaining experience in the college planetarium. Instructor permission required. As warranted.

  
  •  

    PHYS 450 - Condensed Matter Physics


    3 Credit(s)

    Studies of what made the computer revolution possible. Course materials are directed towards understanding of the physics of condensed matter, formerly known as Solid State Physics. Major topics are studies of crystalline structure, electromagnetic optical properties of matter, conductors, insulators and semiconducting materials as in diodes and transistors, present day research and applications. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 106  and PHYS 306 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 465 - Physics Research I


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Designing, performing, interpreting, and summarizing research project in a field of pure or applied physics. Instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

  
  •  

    PHYS 466 - Physics Research II


    1-3 Credit(s)

    A continuation of PHYS 465 .

  
  •  

    PHYS 475 - Mechanics


    3 Credit(s)

    A study of classical mechanics following the theories of Newton, Lagrange, and Hamilton. Topics include: single and multiple particle motion, central forces, rigid body dynamics, moving coordinate systems, and particle interactions. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 205  and PHYS 370  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    PHYS 480 - Electromagnetic Theory I


    3 Credit(s)

    The Industrial Revolution in Europe and elsewhere was the result of progress in theoretical and experimental work in electromagnetism. The course explores the fundamental and experimental work in electromagnetism and the developments at the forefront of the technological worlds. Major Topics are electrostatics, magnetostatics, Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic waves and their interactions with matter, electromagnetic optical properties and their applications. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 205  and PHYS 370  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    PHYS 481 - Electromagnetic Theory II


    3 Credit(s)

    Continuation and further development of topics in PHYS 480 . As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 480 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 484 - Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics


    3 Credit(s)

    A study of heat, thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics. Topics include: heat, heat engines, entropy and the second law of thermodynamics, thermodynamic potentials, phase transitions, and an introduction to statistical mechanics. Spring, or as warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 205  and PHYS 370  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    PHYS 490 - Quantum Physics I


    3 Credit(s)

    Exploring the world of quantum physics that cannot be explained by classical physics based on Sir Isaac Newton’s work. Seeking answer to why it came to be accepted as the best description of physics. Learning the techniques of problem solving that include computational work. Major topics include old quantum theory, wave particle duality, uncertainty principle, Schrodinger’s equation, square well potential, harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom problem, angular momentum theory, electron spin, fine structure, hyperfine structure, spin-orbit interaction, angular momentum coupling schemes and quantum theory of scattering of particles. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 306  and PHYS 370  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    PHYS 491 - Quantum Physics II


    3 Credit(s)

    Continuation and further development of topics in PHYS 490 . As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 490 .
  
  •  

    PHYS 494 - Physics Seminar


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Students study and discuss contemporary research problems and results in the fields of pure and applied physics. 22 semester hours of physics courses required. As warranted.

  
  •  

    PHYS 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    PHYS 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Politics

Note: Most required courses are offered each semester, and most electives are offered every year or every other year. Also, a number of courses satisfy requirements in interdisciplinary programs such as Criminal Justice, Environmental Studies, Human Services, U.S. and Global Studies, and Women’s and Gender Studies. Contact the department chair for more information.

Pre-Law Electives (w/in Politics Dept.)

Note:  Please check w/the Pre-Law adviser about any 395 and 495 courses.

  
  •  

    POLS 100 - Power and Influence


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: FC & PI credit.
    Explores the nature of justice and the content of the good life by focusing on phenomena of power, influence, and authority. More specifically, students are introduced to fundamental questions competing answers about the nature of power, influence, authority, interests, freedom, rights, coercion, manipulation, culture and persuasion. Students also examine possible methods of discerning the existence of power via reasoning, observation, and measurement. Finally, students study some of the basics of critical thinking, with a focus on how to evaluate arguments.

  
  •  

    POLS 110 - Introduction to U.S. Politics


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit, and occasionally taught for FS credit.
    Gives an introduction to the major political institutions in U.S. national politics and the behavior of individuals and groups involved with these institutions. Fall and Spring.

  
  •  

    POLS 122 - Bioethics & the Law


    3-4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: PI.
    Examines the ethical issues raised by the developments in human biology and medicine. Topics discussed will include: withdrawal of life support, abortion, and genetic privacy.

  
  •  

    POLS 130 - Introduction to Comparative Politics


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: XC credit.
    Gives an introduction to basic concepts in comparative political analysis and application of them to selected countries from diverse regions of the world. We will explore the formal political institutions in each country, as well as less formal aspects including political values and culture. We will also examine how society, economy, and globalization help shape domestic politics. Required for all Politics majors. Counts as either a Core course or a Governance elective for International Studies majors. Fall and Spring.

  
  •  

    POLS 140 - Introduction to International Relations


    4 Credit(s)

    Introduces students to fundamental issues in the study of global politics. We look at today’s international politics in a historical perspective by reading different theoretical approaches within the discipline of International Relations and discussing their main arguments and “world views.” The course covers important topics such as the role of international organizations, war and peace, globalization and environmental cooperation. Required for all Politics majors. Counts as either a Core course or a Governance elective for International Studies majors. Fall and Spring.

  
  •  

    POLS 195 - Special Topics


    1-4 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    POLS 198 - Tutorial


    1-4 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    POLS 200 - Political Ideas


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: PI credit.
    Considers major perennial political problems. Introduces concepts and analytical techniques used in the search for appropriate responses to those problems. Fall and Spring.

  
  •  

    POLS 289 - Approaching Political Puzzles


    4 Credit(s)

    Introduces students to the process of writing an original undergraduate research paper in the field of Political Science. Part 1 of the course is devoted to reading and understanding professional research reports. The focus of part 2 is writing a literature review in response to a research question. In Part 3, students become familiar with common research designs and methods of analysis. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): any 2 of the following: POLS 110 , POLS 130 , POLS 140 , or POLS 200 , and either STAT 100  or MATH 125  or CIS 125 .
  
  •  

    POLS 295 - Special Topics


    1-4 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    POLS 298 - Tutorial


    1-4 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    POLS 301 - U.S. Parties, Elections & Interest Groups


    4 Credit(s)

    Examines the historical and contemporary understandings of parties, elections, and interest groups. Their historical development, institutionalization, and importance to our political system are explored within the context of citizen participation. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 .
  
  •  

    POLS 302 - American Media & Politics


    4 Credit(s)

    Allows students to gain a deeper understanding of the interrelationships between mass media, the mass public and public officials. We will study the reciprocal relations between the media, the public and public officials in an effort to think more systematically and become better consumers of political news. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 .
  
  •  

    POLS 306 - Congress and the Presidency


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    Examines the historical and contemporary understandings of the Congress and presidency. We explore each institution separately as well as their relationship with each other, with particular emphasis on presidential-congressional budgeting and policy-making. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 .
  
  •  

    POLS 312 - Crime and Justice


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    Gives an introduction to the U.S. legal system with emphasis on the criminal justice system. This course will focus on the rights of the accused as found in the 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, and 14thAmendments. Counts as an elective for the Pre-Law minor. Every year.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110  or SOCI 103 .
  
  •  

    POLS 313 - U.S. Public Opinion


    4 Credit(s)

    Examines public opinion and mass political behavior in the United States. Among the topics to be explored are the ways in which ordinary citizens make sense of their political world, the quality and sophistication of public opinion, the interplay between mass attitudes and public policy, and the motivations that underlie political participation and electoral choice.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 .
  
  •  

    POLS 316 - Power and Democracy


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    Considers the structure of power; the effects of social class, economic structure and political ideology on the distribution of political power; and the implications for democratic theory and practice. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110  or POLS 200 .
  
  •  

    POLS 318 - Congress & Legislative Process


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit
    Advances student understanding of the legislative process of the U.S. Congress and analyzes the many institutions that affect both the Congress and the various state legislatures: elections rules, committees, political parties, organized interests, the media, party leaders, chief executives, and courts.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 
  
  •  

    POLS 319 - U.S. Presidency


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA.
    Designed as a survey of the presidency of the United States, the course analyzes the office within ‘our separated system,’ sources of presidential power, formal and informal, the process of institutionalization, and presidential elections. The course examines the role of the office in domestic and foreign policy areas. An emphasis is placed on reviewing the latest scholarship and student centered research. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 .
  
  •  

    POLS 321 - Politics and the Judicial Process


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    Gives a legal-political analysis of the institutions and factors shaping judicial behavior and decision-making. Emphasis is placed upon the federal political system, particularly the Supreme Court of the U.S. Counts as an elective for the Pre-Law minor. Alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 .
  
  •  

    POLS 322 - State and Local Government


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    Examines the conflict and cooperation between the state, local, and federal units of government in the United States. Students are asked to develop an understanding of American state and local politics, institutions, and public policy, and also consider how and where they, as a community member and (for most) a citizen - can engage politically. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 .
  
  •  

    POLS 323 - Welfare Policy Research


    4 Credit(s)

    Examines U.S. welfare policy with an emphasis on factors influencing the development of the modern social welfare state and its effects on the poor. Students engage in original research in order to analyze and assess contemporary welfare policy in the light of the historical, economic, and regional contexts in which it operates. Each student group orally presents its research results at the end of the semester and each student writes a paper summarizing his or her contribution. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 , 125, or SOCI 101 , or SOCI 325 .
  
  •  

    POLS 324 - Natural Resource Policy


    4 Credit(s)

    Examines historical and current natural resource policy and management in the U.S. Emphasis will be placed on the political, legal, economic, ecological, and social context in which public land management decisions are made at the national, state, and local level. A minimum of Sophomore standing required. Occasionally.

  
  •  

    POLS 325 - U.S. Public Policy & Administration


    4 Credit(s)

    Examines the creation of U.S. public policies, the policy making process, administrative institutions, organizational theory, and accountability by public officials in elected offices and bureaucracies. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 .
  
  •  

    POLS 326 - Political Intolerance


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Explores the sources of both political tolerance and intolerance within the general public, including the role played by inter-group prejudice. Cases include Russia, South Africa, and the United States. Emphasis on developing the ability to conduct and speak about social science research. A minimum of Junior standing required.

  
  •  

    POLS 327 - Law and Society


    4 Credit(s)

    Examines how society and the courts intersect with each other when controversial policies, such as racial integration are being implemented by judges. It will also explore strategies of defiance of judicial rulings and how courts respond to cues from other political institutions and the manner in which new social developments influence judicial thinking and behavior. Counts as an elective for the Pre-Law minor. Alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 .
  
  •  

    POLS 329 - Gender & the Law


    4 Credit(s)

    Examines the evolving relationship between the law and issues of gender. Relevant developments in common, statutory, and constitutional law are reviewed, and emergent issues are analyzed. Counts as an elective for the Pre-Law minor.

  
  •  

    POLS 329 - Gender and the Law


    4 Credit(s)

    Examines the evolving relationship between the law and issues of gender. Relevant developments in common, statutory, and constitutional law are reviewed, and emergent issues analyzed. A minimum of Junior standing required. Occasionally.

  
  •  

    POLS 332 - Women and Politics


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Explores the impact of male-dominated politics on women and development of feminist politics from U.S., international, and comparative perspectives. It also examines gender, race and class relations in politics of international relations, state, workplace, community and family. Alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 125 or WMST 100  or 200.
  
  •  

    POLS 334 - Democracy Lab


    4 Credit(s)

    Investigates what makes democratic political systems effective, responsive, and accountable to the people. Alternative cultural and theoretical perspectives on democracy are also explored. Cases include national and regional political systems in the United States, Europe, and the former Soviet Union. Counts as a Governance elective for International Studies majors. A minimum of Sophomore standing required. Alternate years.

  
  •  

    POLS 335 - International Conflict


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: Occasionally taught for WI and SI credit.
    Explores different forms of conflict - from non-violent to violent - and their underlying dynamics. It addresses the following questions: Why can some conflicts be managed in a peaceful way, while others end in genocide? What are causes of conflict? What role does the cultural context, the state, the military, the economy, the gender order and ethnicity and nationalism play in conflicts? What are techniques to mediate and transform conflicts? And how in the aftermath of a conflict, can peace be made sustainable? Counts as a Governance elective for International Studies majors. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 140 .
  
  •  

    POLS 337 - International Political Economy


    4 Credit(s)

    Examines both current and past events with international political and economic ramifications, as well as theories that seek to provide systematic explanations for the economic behavior of states. This course is concerned with the interactions and tensions between states and markets. Counts as an Economy elective for International Studies majors. Alternate years.

  
  •  

    POLS 339 - Citizen Politics


    4 Credit(s)

    Explores why, when and how ordinary citizens participate in democratic politics. We will study what motivates participation-that is, why individuals get involved-when citizens choose to join the political process, and how the modes of participation in advanced, industrial democracies may be changing from traditional party politics to new forms of involvement. A minimum of Junior standing required. Alternate years.

  
  •  

    POLS 340 - International Environmental Policy


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA.
    Examines the emergence of global environmental politics with a focus on three areas: (1) historical analysis of the “road from Stockholm to Rio” and the connected concept of sustainability, (2) international environmental regimes and diplomacy, and (3) the role developing countries do and might play in global environmental governance. It begins by examining the scope of environmental agreements and the language of international environmental cooperation. The focus then shifts to the global level by analyzing the actors in the international arena and the differing approaches to world politics. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 .
  
  •  

    POLS 344 - Global Climate Change


    4 Credit(s)

    Explores the human dimensions of global climate change (GCC) and highlight current U.S. policies related to GCC. We will investigate the expected impacts and the diversity of proposed mitigation and adaptation strategies. The class will develop group projects to educate the local community on climate change issues and conduct hands-on activities on Earth Day. A minimum of Sophomore standing required. Occasionally.

  
  •  

    POLS 348 - Water Policy


    4 Credit(s)

    Provides an overview of water resource policy and management at the global, national, and regional scale. Course will begin with a focus on global water issues and the complexity in managing this increasingly important resource. Course will highlight U.S. water policy and management issues and will emphasize the historical roots of today’s water resource policies; as well as, explore regional water issues. Counts towards Environmental Studies. A minimum of Sophomore standing required. Occasionally.

  
  •  

    POLS 349 - European Union


    4 Credit(s)

    Focuses on the political economy of the European Union. In order to understand the current state of the EU, the course surveys the history of European integration, analyzes the functions of the major institution of the EU, and introduces students to basic political economy concepts. Based on this knowledge, this course analyzes a selection of core EU policies, ranging from immigration and agricultural policy to enlargement and the European Monetary Union. Counts as a Governance elective for International Studies majors. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
  •  

    POLS 350 - International Relations Theory


    4 Credit(s)

    Why do actors in the international system (e.g. states, intergovernmental organizations, non-governmental organizations, and other non-state actors) behave and interact in the way they do, especially in regards to conflict and cooperation? There are many explanations for their international behavior, primarily because theorists often “see” the world differently. In this course, we will analyze these explanations and their underlying meta-theoretical assumptions by studying a host of international theories. Counts as a Governance elective for International Studies majors. A minimum of Sophomore standing required. Occasionally.

  
  •  

    POLS 354 - Western Political Thought


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: PI & WC credit.
    Explores different possible answers to perennial political questions such as “What is human nature,” “What is politics,” and “What is the best political system.” These questions are explored by selectively surveying original classics of Western political theory and by studying works of commentary on those classics. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 200 .
  
  •  

    POLS 355 - Politics and the Environment


    4 Credit(s)

    Examines the environmental movement, governmental institutions and policymaking as it relates to the environmental problems, the ways to think about the interactions of humans with the natural and built environments and the searches for grassroots solutions to environmental problems. There is also a focus on national institutions and structures aimed at imparting an understanding of presidential leadership, congressional gridlock and judicial environmental policy. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 .
  
  •  

    POLS 357V - Violent Dissolution of Yugoslavia


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WC credit.
    This travel course provides students with the unique opportunity to study international and ethnic conflict in Dubrovnik, Croatia, which was under siege during the Balkan wars in the 1990s. This course focuses predominantly on the wards during the collapse of major conflicts of the 20thcentury that involved the Balkan region, are studied. Counts as a Governance elective for International Studies majors. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 140 .
  
  •  

    POLS 359 - International Migrants & Refugees


    4 Credit(s)

    Provides an overview over the interdisciplinary study of voluntary and forced international migration. It investigates the history and causes for the processes of migration and its impacts on both sending and receiving countries. In addition, it takes a closer look at experiences of migrants, with a focus on human trafficking and migration control measures as well as transnational living. Counts as a Governance elective for International Studies majors. A minimum of Sophomore standing required.

  
  •  

    POLS 395 - Special Topics


    1-4 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    POLS 398 - Tutorial


    1-4 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    POLS 400 - Senior Seminar


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Acquaints students with principles of performance and research in the discipline of political science. Students write a major research paper. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing. 12-16 semester hours in Political Science recommended. POLS 110 , POLS 130 , POLS 140 , POLS 200  and POLS 289  as well as one of the following: STAT 100 , MATH 125 , or CIS 125 .
  
  •  

    POLS 412 - Constitutional Law


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AH & WI credit.
    Study of the early formation of U.S. Constitutional law role of the U.S. Supreme Court, with emphasis on issue of federalism. Counts as an elective for the Pre-Law minor.Counts an as elective for both the Criminal Justice major and minor. Alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 .
  
  •  

    POLS 413 - Freedom of Expression and Religion


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    Legal-political analysis of the development of national policy regarding the First Amendment with emphasis on Supreme Court decisions dealing with obscenity, libel, subversive speech and religious freedom. Counts as an elective for the Pre-Law minor. Counts as an elective for both the Criminal Justice major and minor. Alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 . POLS 321  recommended.
  
  •  

    POLS 414 - Environmental Law


    4 Credit(s)

    Provides a survey and analysis of statutes, both state and federal, regulating water, soil, air pollution, resource conservation and recovery, and the actions of the Environmental Protection Agency. The course also addresses questions pertaining to problems of implementation, interpretation, enforcement, and development of environmental laws. In addition, the course examines New York State environmental laws, the New York State Constitution, especially Article 14 and other rules and regulations that pertain to the Adirondack Park. Counts as an elective for the Pre-Law minor.Counts towards Environmental Studies. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 .
  
  •  

    POLS 415 - Civil Liberties: Race, Sex & Privacy


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    Gives a focus on the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment as well as the Court’s development of the constitutional right to privacy. Counts as an elective for the Pre-Law minor. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 110 .
  
  •  

    POLS 420 - Recent U.S. Foreign Policy


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Political process by which foreign policy is made; origins and character of Cold War; and role and interests of the United States in a post-cold war world. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 200 .
  
  •  

    POLS 432 - Politics of Global Inequality


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: XC credit.
    Provides a historical overview of the evolution of the international capitalist system. Several competing explanations for the unequal division of wealth and poverty in the global economy are evaluated. We also explore contemporary issues such as the debt crisis, economic development strategies, the role of transnational corporations, and environmental degradation, with an emphasis on specific country examples. Counts as an Economy elective for International Studies majors. A minimum of Sophomore standing required. Occasionally.

  
  •  

    POLS 490 - Legal Internship


    4 Credit(s)

    Students assigned to members of legal profession. Nature of work generally includes legal research, attendance at trials and drafting of briefs or legal memoranda. Students prepare term paper dealing with an aspect of the law to which they have been exposed. Outstanding work in law-related courses and instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 321 .
  
  •  

    POLS 491 - Public Policy Internship


    4 Credit(s)

    During Summer, Fall or Spring semesters students work as researchers and administrative assistants with policy implementing government and non-governmental agencies. Instructor permission required. Fall, Spring, and Summer.

  
  •  

    POLS 492 - Internship Seminar


    3 Credit(s)

    Conducted in conjunction with New York State Senate and Assembly Internship Programs or the Washington Brockport Internship Program. Students must complete all requirements of their internship program (including the completion of @POLS 494 ) and write an in-depth term project or paper. A minimum of Junior standing and instructor permission required. Open to all majors.

  
  •  

    @POLS 494 - Political Science Internship


    12 Credit(s)

    Conducted in conjunction with New York State Senate and Assembly Internship Program or Washington Brockport Internship. Must be taken concurrently with POLS 492  for a maximum of 15 semester hours combined. A minimum of Junior standing and instructor permission required. Open to all majors.

  
  •  

    POLS 495 - Special Topics


    1-4 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    POLS 498 - Tutorial


    1-4 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    POLS 499 - Honors Thesis Research


    4 Credit(s)

    Students will continue to revise and expand their Seminar paper from POLS 400 and complete a final written thesis and oral defense which will be graded by the Chair of the student’s Honors Committee with the input of the other Committee members.


Psychology

Courses are offered each semester unless otherwise designated.

  
  •  

    PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    Survey of the science of psychology; what psychologists do, methods they use, and conclusions they draw. Fall and Spring.

  
  •  

    PSYC 111 - Exploring Psychology


    1 Credit(s)

    This class is designed to provide first-year students with a focused look at the field of Psychology, the Psychology faculty and major at SUNY Potsdam, as well as related fields and opportunities. First and second year students only.

  
  •  

    PSYC 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    PSYC 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    PSYC 220 - Child Development


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    Major Issues, topics and theories of child development with emphasis on early years. Fall and Spring.

  
  •  

    PSYC 270 - Issues of Exceptionality


    3 Credit(s)

    Human exceptionality: historical and cross-cultural perspective. Not currently offered.

  
  •  

    PSYC 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    PSYC 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    PSYC 300 - Research Methods in Psychology


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Introductory laboratory course examining research methods, experimental designs and basic experimental theory. Psychology writing style is developed using data from animal and/or human studies. Lecture and lab. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  and Introductory Statistics.
  
  •  

    @PSYC 301 - Teaching of Psychology


    3 Credit(s)

    Tutoring students enrolled in various psychology courses. Tutors work closely with instructor to learn more effective means of teaching. Instructor permission required. As warranted.

  
  •  

    PSYC 313 - Cognitive Development


    3 Credit(s)

    Designed to explore cognitive development during childhood and adolescence. Focuses on changes in children’s thinking that occur over time in a variety of domains. Topics: current approaches and theories of cognitive development, developmental changes in memory, perception and language; assessment of intelligence and creativity; cognitive bases of such social phenomena as perspective taking and moral reasoning. As warranted.

  
  •  

    PSYC 320 - Advanced Topics in Child Development


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Theories of human development, study of the child in various contexts (e.g., school, home), cognitive development. A General Education Freshman Speaking course required. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  or PSYC 220 .
  
  •  

    PSYC 321 - Psychology of Adolescence


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: Gen. Ed: SA credit.
    Developmental characteristics and theories of adolescent behavior. Emphasis on empirical research. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  or PSYC 220  or Sophomore standing.
  
  •  

    PSYC 322 - Introduction to Intellectual Disabilities


    3 Credit(s)

    Causes, assessment techniques, etiological classification and theories of retardation. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  and PSYC 220  or instructor permission required.
  
  •  

    PSYC 323 - Adulthood, Middle Age and Aging


    3 Credit(s)

    Psychological, biological and sociological aspects of development from early adult years to death. Theories of aging and bio-physiological aspects of aging. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  and PSYC 220 .
  
  •  

    PSYC 330 - Social Psychology


    3 Credit(s)

    An introduction to the social side of human behavior. Topics include: aggression, prejudice, attitudes, group behavior, attraction and relationships.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  and PSYC 300 , or SOCI 315.
  
  •  

    PSYC 337 - Audiologic Principles in Hearing


    3 Credit(s)

    Acoustics, anatomy and physiology of the ear; theories of hearing, hearing disorders and their treatment. Basic methods of audiometric testing with limited practicum and observation in a clinical setting. As warranted.

  
  •  

    PSYC 340 - Human Learning and Memory


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will provide an overview of the scientific and theoretical approaches to the basic principles of human learning and memory. Particular emphasis will be placed on how these principles apply to educational and therapeutic settings. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  and PSYC 300 .
  
  •  

    PSYC 350 - Educational Psychology


    3 Credit(s)

    Human behavior in educational settings; the effective teacher, role of motivation, use of tests and testing, exceptional children, learning, teacher roles, classroom management and control. Junior or Senior standing required. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 , PSYC 220  or PSYC 321 .
  
  •  

    PSYC 361 - Elements of Behavior Modification


    3 Credit(s)

    Basic principles of behavior, their application to human behavior, the influence of social and physical environments and modification of behavior in natural and institutional settings. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 300  or instructor permission required.
 

Page: 1 <- Back 1014 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24