Dec 01, 2022  
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog 
    
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


@ = Indicates a non-liberal arts course. Please refer to College Credit Policies  for a description of non-liberal arts credits.

 

Psychology

Courses are offered each semester unless otherwise designated.

  
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    PSYC 363 - Psychology of Women


    3 Credit(s)

    A survey of women’s psychological development from infancy through adulthood and how it is influenced by social and biological factors relevant to women. This course is usually conducted as a seminar. Occasionally.

  
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    PSYC 364 - Counseling Theory and Methods


    3 Credit(s)

    Provides an introduction to the major historical theories of counseling and some of the counseling methods used by proponents of these theories.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 370  or PSYC 375 .
  
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    PSYC 370 - Theories of Personality


    3 Credit(s)

    Exposition and critical examination of the major schools of thought in personality theory. Six hours in psychology required.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 .
  
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    PSYC 375 - Abnormal Psychology


    3 Credit(s)

    An in-depth investigation into the symptoms and causes of the major diagnoses in use today. Included is the concept of “mental health” vs. “mental illness” and the major theories of abnormality.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 .
  
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    PSYC 376 - Child Psychopathology


    3 Credit(s)

    This course focuses on issues of childhood mental illness. Examination of psychiatric disorders, issues of abuse and neglect, and social/cultural issues are also examined.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 375 .
  
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    PSYC 377 - Forensic Psychology


    3 Credit(s)

    This course covers the major issues related to psychology and the law. It covers such topics as: expert testimony, eyewitness accounts, false memory, lie detection, malingering, jury selection, criminal profiling, interviewing techniques, and the use of psychological testing. It is expected that students will gain a psychological understanding of the legal system.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 .
  
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    PSYC 380 - Animal Behavior


    3 Credit(s)

    Behavioral adaptations found in broad sampling of vertebrate and invertebrate animal species. Emphasis on systems involved in survival and adaptation.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite applies to majors only: PSYC 300 .
  
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    PSYC 381 - Biopsychology


    3 Credit(s)

    Neurophysiological bases of psychological processes. Basic anatomy, chemistry and cell electrophysiology, as related to behavior are emphasized. Sensory processes, sleep and sex are also discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  and PSYC 300 .
  
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    PSYC 382 - Biopsychology Laboratory


    3 Credit(s)

    Advanced instruction and laboratory exercises in human and non-human physiological psychology using contemporary instruments, techniques and methodologies. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 381 .
  
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    PSYC 383 - Drugs and Behavior


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is a scientific approach to the way in which psychoactive drugs of use and abuse influence brain and behavior. Major addictive drugs such as cocaine, amphetamine, heroin, nicotine, alcohol, and other illicit substances such as LSD, marijuana and synthetic analogs are discussed. Also, psychiatric medications (e.g., antidepressants, anxiolytics and antipsychotics are also discussed in terms of modes of activity and behavior outcomes. Mechanisms of action within the brain, various perspectives of addiction and withdrawal, and treatments will be discussed. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  and PSYC 300 .
  
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    PSYC 384 - Cognitive Psychology


    3 Credit(s)

    Cognitive psychology involves the experimental study of mental representation and processing. Topics include: neurology, attention, pattern recognition, reasoning, problem solving, cognitive development, and linguistic processing. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  and PSYC 300 .
  
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    PSYC 385 - Sensory Psychology I: Vision


    3 Credit(s)

    Processes by which physical stimuli are translated into psychological phenomena and organized into perceptions. Emphasis on vision, taste, touch, smell. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 300 .
  
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    PSYC 386 - Sensory Psychology II: Hearing


    3 Credit(s)

    Transforming acoustic vibrations; encoding and perceiving them as tones, noise, speech, etc. Topics: sound and middle ear function, anatomy and electrophysiology of inner ear and nervous system, psychoacoustic measurement of pitch and loudness, masking, critical bandwidth, frequency discrimination, binaural hearing and perception. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 300  or instructor permission required.
  
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    PSYC 390 - Tests and Measurements


    3 Credit(s)

    Principles of psychological testing and assessment. Test construction and evaluation, clinical techniques, evaluation and comparison, and ethical questions related to these methods. Junior or Senior standing required. Occasionally.

    Prerequisite(s): STAT 100  or PSYC 125 or MATH 125  or CIS 125 .
  
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    PSYC 392 - Experimental Psychology


    4 Credit(s)

    Basic experimental design for research in some or all of the modern areas of experimental psychology. As warranted.

  
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    PSYC 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    PSYC 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    PSYC 400 - History of Psychology


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Why is psychology the way it is? Where did it come from and where is it going? Recommended for potential graduate students. Senior standing required. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  and PSYC 300 .
  
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    PSYC 401 - Seminar on Evolution


    3 Credit(s)

    Implications and applications of evolutionary theory. Paleontological, biological and behavioral evidence for evolution, and impact on natural and social sciences. Junior or Senior standing required. Fall.

  
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    PSYC 405 - Wittgenstein and Psychology


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines conceptual problems in psychology through the lens of Ludwig Wittgenstein’s (1889-1951) later writings. Topics include meaning and understanding, rule-following, cognition, intention, and the emotions.

  
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    PSYC 409 - Classic Psychology


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI.
    Through this course, and through examining psychological writings that are at least 40 years old, students will come to their own well-reasoned conclusions concerning the definition of “classic psychological writings,” decide why they define “classic” the way they do, discover why certain writings have become classics, and see if there is anything that some or all classic psychological writings have in common that would help explain their remarkable staying power within psychology. Through addressing those issues, students will come to see for themselves what are the core values and fundamental issues that have been important within psychology for decades, and remain salient contemporarily. A Gen Ed Freshman Speaking course required. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 300 .
  
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    PSYC 415 - Research in Psychology


    3 Credit(s)

    Guided research in area chosen by instructor. Topics announced as course is offered. No more than three credits of Research in Psychology may be used as elective in psychology, and no more than six credits may be taken in student’s career. Junior or Senior standing and instructor permission required. Occasionally.

  
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    PSYC 416 - Research in Psychology


    2 Credit(s)

    Same as PSYC 415 .

  
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    PSYC 417 - Research in Psychology


    1 Credit(s)

    Same as PSYC 415 .

  
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    PSYC 424 - Child Maltreatment


    3 Credit(s)

    Exploring the field of knowledge pertaining to child and adolescent maltreatment with emphasis on understanding the impact of maltreatment on child/adolescent development. The course is a seminar with considerable student participation expected. Occasionally.

  
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    @PSYC 444 - Internship in Psychology


    1-12 Credit(s)

    Student-arranged internship provides direct experience and training in human service settings. Instructor permission and Junior or Senior standing required. As warranted.

  
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    @PSYC 445 - Internship in Psychology


    6-12 Credit(s)

    Same as @PSYC 444 .

  
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    PSYC 451 - Psychology and Sci Fi: Honors


    3 Credit(s)

    This course explores the intersection of the field of psychology and social science fiction. The rich portrayal of psychology and social science fiction serves as a unique vantage point to understand the impact of science upon literature, film, and what it means to be human in a social setting. Admission to Honors Program and completion of an introduction to a social science discipline (e.g., PSYC 100 , SOCI 101 , ANTC 102) or instructor permission required. Fall.

  
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    PSYC 480 - Sociobiology


    3 Credit(s)

    Central theoretical structure of sociobiology, data supporting the theory, implications of the theory and criticisms. Human and animal social behavior. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 380  or instructor permission required.
  
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    PSYC 484 - Psychology of Language


    3 Credit(s)

    Theory and research on topics such as language development, the biological basis of language, language comprehension and production, and the role of culture.

  
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    PSYC 493 - Seminar in Psychology


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: Some sections carry Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Student selection of topics determines content. Instructor presents current issues in psychology throughout semester. Junior or Senior standing, at least 12 semester hours in psychology or instructor permission required. Occasionally.

  
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    PSYC 494 - Honors Seminar


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: Gen. Ed: SI credit.
    Student selection of honors topics determines content. Current issues in psychology are discussed. Spring.

  
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    PSYC 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    PSYC 496 - Honors Thesis Research I


    3 Credit(s)

    Selection, preparation and beginning of Honors Thesis. As warranted.

  
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    PSYC 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    PSYC 499 - Honors Thesis Research II


    3 Credit(s)

    Completion and defense of written Honors Thesis. As warranted.


Public Health and Human Performance

All 300 and 400 level courses require A minimum of Junior standing.

  
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    HLTH 165 - Health: A Lifestyle Approach


    3 Credit(s)

    A critical analysis and overview of the interrelatedness of the social, emotional and physical elements of one’s lifestyle. Topics such as physical fitness, nutrition, sexuality, environmental health, stress management, and substance use prevention will be discussed relative to their role in individual and community health concerns. Fall and Spring.

  
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    HLTH 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    HLTH 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    @HLTH 200 - Therapeutic Recreation


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines recreation as an integral part of the treatment process for youth-at-risk, people with disabilities, and other special populations such s those with drug/alcohol dependencies. The use of adventure experiences as modalities for participant change is a primary focus of this course. Fall.

  
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    @HLTH 210 - Virtual Anatomy & Physiology Cadaver Lab


    1 Credit(s)

    Students will explore human anatomy and physiology using software that simulates a human cadaver lab. Students will begin with information related to body orientation, cells and chemistry, and tissues. Students will then continue on to the following systems: integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, Nervous, Endocrine, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic, Respiratory, Urinary, and Reproductive systems.

    Pre/Corequisite(s): BIOL 107 .

  
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    HLTH 230 - School Health (CA, SAVE)


    2 Credit(s)

    This course will cover the nature, etiology and prevention of the most common childhood health concerns (e.g., diseases, injuries, etc.) and of the behavioral risk factors for adolescents identified by the Centers for Disease Control. Some of the topics to be covered include signs of child maltreatment and child maltreatment reporting requirements; signs warning of violent behavior in students, regulations related to providing a safe, nonviolent school climate, strategies for promoting a nonviolent school climate (including development of students’ social and problem-solving skills) and strategies for intervening appropriately with students exhibiting or at risk of engaging in violent behavior; fire safety and prevention, arson prevention, drug abuse prevention and child abduction prevention. The course will review the components of coordinated school health programs and current health education standards. Students will also discuss health-related challenges and controversies currently facing schools. Students enrolled in teacher education programs only. Fall and Spring. Also typically offered during Winter and Summer sessions.

  
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    HLTH 250 - Drug Studies


    3 Credit(s)

    Examination of the physiological, psychological, economic, social and cultural problems related to use and abuse of psychoactive substances. Misconceptions, beliefs, and various sources of information are critically evaluated in order to establish a sound basis for personal decision making. Teaching techniques, group dynamics, and non-chemical alternatives to drugs are explored as preventative tools. Spring.

  
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    HLTH 270 - Health Coaches I


    2 Credit(s)

    This course is offered in collaboration with Canton-Potsdam Hospital to introduce pre-health career students to key issues in current healthcare policy, management and delivery. The course will introduce students to medical, system-wide, ethical, and practical issues in population health. This one semester introduction provides students with the necessary foundation for a subsequent two credit hour Health Coach II with Canton-Potsdam Hospital professionals.

  
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    HLTH 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    HLTH 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    HLTH 300 - Environmental Health


    3 Credit(s)

    An analysis of the environmental nature of public health and on controlling the factors that are harmful to health. Focus is on current environmental issues including water and air pollution, workplace safety, environmental toxins, food safety, and shelter and how those issue have an impact on the health of individuals. Fall.

  
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    HLTH 310 - Health Disparities


    3 Credit(s)

    In this course, students will examine disparities in the health status of a variety of population groups defined on the basis of race/ethnicity, sex, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, age, ability, etc. Students will examine and discuss epidemiologic data illustrating disparities, factors that contribute to those disparities and strategies to address disparities.

  
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    HLTH 325 - Alcohol Studies


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI and SA credit.
    An examination of the physical, psychological, and sociological implications of alcohol use and abuse. A primary focus is on confronting our own as well as others attitudes and beliefs about alcohol use. Additional emphasis is placed on theories of causation, awareness of values, and conflicting value systems relating to prevention and the importance of developing an understanding of the role of alcohol use in western society. Spring.

  
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    HLTH 331 - Death and Dying


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    An examination of the social and psychological implications of the study of death and dying with particular emphasis on their relevance to enhancing the quality of life. Death is viewed as an integral part of life and the final stage of growth, more than a mere biological event. A focus of the course is to provide an understanding of those issues which have an impact upon individuals when going through life-threatening processes. The importance of recognizing needs, nonverbal or symbolic behavior and effective communication is studied along with the impact of loss in the life cycle. Spring.

  
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    HLTH 333 - Human Nutrition


    3 Credit(s)

    Designed to acquaint the student with the basic principles of nutrition including a study of the nutrients, their functions and sources, the application of nutrition principles to the various stages of the human life cycle, the question of food safety in terms of additives, residues, and natural toxicants, and the area of nutrition quackery. Students will become involved in self-evaluation projects and group discussions that will enable them to apply the basic principles to their daily eating habits and lifestyles. Fall and Spring.

  
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    HLTH 341 - Sexual Health


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to be an exploration of topics in sexual health. Students will examine adolescent and sexual identity development; sexual health issues such as sexually transmitted disease, reproduction and sexual violence, and community health strategies used to address sexual health such as sexuality education, disease prevention and sexual health promotion efforts, sexual/reproductive health care. Students will also explore the impact of attitudes about sex on sexual health and on public health strategies to address sexual health. Spring.

  
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    HLTH 342 - Women’s Health


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines health concerns specific to women. Behavioral, psychological and socio-cultural aspects of women’s experience in health systems will be explored, as well as general influences such as age, race, ethnicity and social class on women’s roles as recipients and providers of health care. Course topics include historical perspectives on women’s health, gender differences in morbidity and mortality, patient and health care provider relationships, health care consumerism, the impact of employment, motherhood, divorce and aging, and other health concerns unique to women. Fall.

  
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    HLTH 343 - Maternal and Child Health


    3 Credit(s)

    Maternal Child Health (MCH) offers an introduction to health issues affecting infants, children, adolescents and women of reproductive age. The course focuses on the ways in which poverty, politics, and racial/ethnic disparities affect the health of families in the U.S. and abroad. Students will examine the history and organization of MCH programs in the U.S., discuss the organization and financing of MCH health services, and explore current topics and trends in MCH, including pregnancy and childbirth, children with special needs, and teen pregnancy, among others. Spring.

  
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    HLTH 344 - Issues in Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Health


    3 Credit(s)

    This seminar-style course explores issues related to the health and well being of lesbian women, gay men and bisexual women and men. Topics covered include the development of gay, lesbian or bisexual identity; the impact of coming out on well being; the current state of research into the gay, lesbian and bisexual health; the nature of homophobia and heterosexism; the impact of living in a homophobic, heterosexist society; strategies to combat homophobia/heterosexism and build supportive environments (in schools, health care settings, etc.); and related topics of interest to students enrolled in the class. As warranted.

  
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    HLTH 345 - Child Abuse and Neglect


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will examine child abuse and neglect as a significant public health problem. Students will examine the nature, prevalence, determinants and consequences of abuse and neglect. In addition, programs and systems to identify, respond to and prevent abuse and neglect will be critically reviewed. As warranted.

  
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    HLTH 346 - Preventing Violence Against Women


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will provide students with an introduction to violence against women and efforts to prevent it. While violence is perpetrated against men, the focus of this course is to understand its etiology and impact against women. In this course, students will learn about types of violence against women, the health consequences of violence, as well as risk factors for both victimization and perpetration. Students will explore the efficacy of violence prevention efforts in both public health and the criminal justice systems. As warranted.

  
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    HLTH 361 - Foundations of Community Health


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA and SI credit.
    This course outlines the history, evolution and status of the practice of health education among groups of people who define themselves as a community. There is a focus on health behaviors, environmental influences, health policy, and economic and health care system issues in health promotion and disease prevention. Fall and Spring.

  
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    @HLTH 370 - Health Coaches II


    2 Credit(s)

    Students will learn methods for medical assessment and will develop their own ability to undertake comprehensive bio-psycho-social insights for promoting positive health behaviors in others. These methods will include ethically-informed practices for helping patients toward better adherence of medical plans, avoidance of at-risk behaviors, assistance in navigating the healthcare system and understanding of personal health. Students will have the opportunity to meet one on one with patients discharged from Canton Potsdam Hospital, under the supervision of the Health Care Team. Satisfactory completion of the Health Coaches I Seminar is required for participation in Health Coaches II; however, it does not guarantee selection.

  
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    HLTH 371 - Nutrition for Special Populations


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    This course will cover issues related to the nutrition among specific populations of people. Topics will include prenatal nutrition, nutrition for children and the elderly, and nutrition for athletes. Fall.

  
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    HLTH 373 - Current Topics in Community Health Nutrition


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will cover issues related to the latest research in nutrition. Students will investigate such topics as phytochemicals, vegetarianism and herbal supplements. Fall.

  
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    HLTH 375 - Navigating the American Diet


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will provide an in-depth analysis of the science of weight management. Using current scientific nutrition research students will learn about the nature of hunger, appetite and satiety and will explore how the current American diet promotes weight gain. Students will learn about current fad diets; how obesity and weight gain are associated with chronic disease; the role of physical activity in weight management; the dangers associated with disordered eating; and medical treatment methods for treating obesity including appetite suppressants and gastric bypass surgery. Through interactive, student led activities, students will learn how to maximize nutrients and flavor in the food they eat without also maximizing calories. Spring.

  
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    HLTH 380 - Theory in Community Health


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will provide students with an overview of theories used in health education and communication. Fall and Spring.

  
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    HLTH 385 - Epidemiology and Biostatistics


    3 Credit(s)

    Introduction to principles and methods of epidemiology and biostatistics used to study etiology, distribution and control of disease. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): STAT 100  or MATH 125 .
  
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    HLTH 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    HLTH 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    HLTH 430 - Human Disease: Patterns, Prevention and Intervention


    3 Credit(s)

    Contemporary concepts of causation, prevention and intervention of chronic and communicable disease. Individual and community risk factors will be analyzed with an emphasis on prevention. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 107 .
  
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    HLTH 465 - Health Instruction Strategies


    3 Credit(s)

    An introduction into the philosophy, instructional strategies, and general health topics applied while instructing health courses. Discussion of relevant topics, assessment techniques, and student-teacher interaction will provide students with skills, knowledge, and experience needed to successfully teach a health course to both high school and college students. Emphasis is on appropriate instruction techniques and public speaking skills that most effectively will reach the target population. Community Health majors only. Instructor permission required. As warranted.

  
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    @HLTH 470 - Program Planning


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    An analysis of methods and strategies for community health needs assessment, determining community demographics and program needs. Discussion and application of community health program planning and implementation in a variety of settings, as well as criteria and procedures for program evaluation.

    Prerequisite(s): HLTH 361 .
  
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    HLTH 475 - Seminar: Community Health Minor


    2 Credit(s)

    Exposes Community Health minors to community programs or agencies. Students gain experience developing or working on an applied project. Community Health minors only. Fall, Spring and Summer.

    Prerequisite(s): HLTH 165   and HLTH 361 .
  
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    @HLTH 476 - Seminar: Nutrition Minor


    2 Credit(s)

    Exposes Nutrition minors to programs or agencies. Students gain experience developing or working on a nutrition project. Nutrition minors only. Fall, Spring, and Summer.

    Prerequisite(s): HLTH 165  and HLTH 371  and HLTH 373 .
  
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    HLTH 480 - Program Evaluation


    3 Credit(s)

    Evaluation theory and fundamental principles of evaluation technique. Process, outcome and impact evaluations of the effectiveness and efficacy of disease and injury prevention and intervention programs will be developed using qualitative and quantitative methods.

    Prerequisite(s): HLTH 361  and @HLTH 470 .
  
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    @HLTH 485 - Pre-Internship Seminar


    2 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to prepare Community Health majors to select their internships for the following semester. The course will include interviewing techniques, supervisor-employee relationships, responsibilities as an intern, with significant emphasis on student research in the content area of their interest (e.g., nutrition, environmental health, substance use prevention, etc.) Students must take this course the semester prior to their internship. Community Health majors only. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): @HLTH 470  or HLTH 480 .
  
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    @HLTH 490 - Internship


    12 Credit(s)

    A full semester experiential placement in a community-based, health-related agency (two separate 7-week experiences). May require residence in any part of state at student’s expense. To enroll, students must complete all courses required for the major with a 2.5 or higher major GPA; students must earn at least a 2.0 in each course counting toward the major; and students must have earned a passing score on the entrance essay. Contact the Community Health Internship Coordinator, Sarah Lister at listersl@potsdam.edu. Fall, Spring and Summer.

  
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    @HLTH 491 - Honors Internship


    6 Credit(s)

    Honors students will spend 20 hours/week for 14 weeks interning at a local public health organization. Students must meet all eligibility requirements for the Community Health Major Internship (HLTH 490). Instructor permissions required. Fall and Spring. S*/U* grading only.

    Prerequisite(s): HLTH 485  with a minimum grade of 3.0.
    Corequisite(s): HLTH 493  and HLTH 494 .
  
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    @HLTH 492 - Honors Thesis I


    3 Credit(s)

    In conjunction with a faculty mentor, over the course of an academic year, students will complete an Honor’s Thesis. For Honor’s Thesis I, students will complete Chapter 1 (needs assessment/literature review) and Chapter 2 (methods). Students in the Honor’s Program will meet weekly to discuss their theses and review research methods. Admission into the Community Health Honors Program and instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    @HLTH 493 - Honors Thesis II


    3 Credit(s)

    Students will analyze and interpret the data and complete Chapters 3 (Results) and Chapter 4 (discussion) of the thesis. Students will present their research to faculty and representatives of any community organization(s) involved in the research. Instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): HLTH 492 .
    Corequisite(s): HLTH 491  and HLTH 494 .
  
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    @HLTH 494 - Honors Seminar


    3 Credit(s)

    Students attend a regional, state or national public health conference. The conference will afford students opportunity to network and learn about the latest research in the field. Students will prepare a final report for distribution to the Community Health faculty and students. The Honors students will meet bi-weekly in the Honor’s lounge to discuss their thesis research and internship placements. Instructor permission required.  Fall and Spring. S*/U* grading only.

    Prerequisite(s): HLTH 492 .
    Corequisite(s): HLTH 491  and HLTH 493 .
  
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    HLTH 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    HLTH 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Secondary Education

  
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    @SECD 210 - Computer Applications in Middle/Secondary Education


    1 Credit(s)

    To provide an introduction to the use of microcomputers in education. The course will present general knowledge about personal computers, the Internet and an overview of their use in secondary education. The course will emphasize general software applications of computer technology in education. Students will also have the opportunity to examine resources available through the Internet in specific educational areas. Fall and Spring.

  
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    @SECD 316 - Technology and Media in Middle/Secondary School Mathematics


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will provide students the opportunity to learn how technology and media can enhance the understanding of mathematics when used appropriately. Students will explore appropriate uses of the calculator, graphing calculator, spreadsheets, and software such as Geometer’s Sketchpad. They will review the state regulations related to the use of calculating devices on the NYS Regents examinations and learn how to use technology for adapting instruction to special needs students. Students will study the use of the internet to support secondary mathematics education. In addition, they will review the use of other multimedia devices and products.

    Pre/Corequisite(s): EDLS 349 .

  
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    @SECD 340 - Classroom Management in Secondary Education


    1 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to develop the skill necessary to address student behavior in the classroom. The focus will be on effective practices and techniques for behavior management and classroom teacher leadership. Participants will be provided opportunities to practice and observe different approaches through various activities and in the practicum for the English Language Arts Learning Communities and Foreign Language education programs. Current issues and problems will also be discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): EDLS 349 .
  
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    @SECD 356 - Reading in the Middle/Secondary Schools


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores the skills, strategies, and diverse text structures for reading across the disciplines. Application of teaching methods in the Secondary Education curriculum to support reading development of native English speakers and students who are English language learners. Fall, Spring and Summer.

  
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    @SECD 357 - Writing in the Middle/Secondary Schools


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores the skills, strategies, and diverse text structures for writing across the disciplines. Application of teaching methods in the Secondary Education curriculum to support writing development of native English speakers and students who are English language learners. Fall and Summer.

  
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    @SECD 361 - English Language Arts: Grades 5-12


    4 Credit(s)

    Introduction to teaching literacy (reading, writing, speaking and listening) in the English Language Arts classroom, grades 5-12. Focused studies will include: developmental considerations of middle childhood (grades 5-9) and adolescence (grades 7-12) and their relationship to language acquisition, English language arts curricula, and state and national standards at the two development levels. Common threads in the two areas of focused studies will include 1) student-centered literacy and 2) language arts curriculum and instruction which integrate the literacy skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening to provide for the learning needs, interests, and abilities of all students, including learners acquiring the English language arts as a second language and students with special learning needs. Resources for teaching ELA available through computer technology will be explored and criteria for evaluating these resources and software will be reviewed and applied. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 203 , COMM 201 , COMP 202 , EDLS 349 , and SECD 210  and 12 credits in Literature/Writing major.
  
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    @SECD 370 - Teaching Mathematics in Middle School


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will introduce students to current research and issues related to teaching mathematics in the middle school. The students in this course will learn how to engage middle school students in meaningful mathematics, how to work with middle school students who are not meeting minimum standards and how to prepare middle school students for the abstract world of algebra. They will become knowledgeable about the current NYS Learning Standards for Mathematics and the NCTM Standards. Students will concurrently take @SECD 390 . Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): EDLS 349  & @SECD 316 .
    Corequisite(s): SECD 390 .
  
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    @SECD 371 - Teaching Writing Language/Communication: Grades 5-12


    4 Credit(s)

    Second course in the sequence in teaching literacy in English Language Arts classroom, grades 5-12. This course will extend study of literacy for all learners, including students acquiring the English language arts as a second language and students with special learning needs, in middle childhood and adolescence English Language Arts classrooms. The course will provide focused studies on the teaching of writing, language, and communication. Infused throughout this focused study at both the middle childhood and adolescence levels will be teaching strategies for integrating reading, writing, speaking and listening.  Students will also examine media and technology applications, resources, software, computer-based multimedia programs, and non-print “texts” for teaching writing, language and communication. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): SECD 361 .
    Corequisite(s):  @SECD 391 .
  
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    @SECD 372 - Science Instruction and Assessment: Grades 5-12


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to enable future teachers to examine their own beliefs about science, learning, and teaching, as well as to develop understanding of the tenets upon which the National Science Education Standards and National Science Teacher Association Teacher Preparation Standards are based. The course will focus on standards for teaching and assessment in grades 5-8 and 9-12. Students will use technology in support of active learning throughout this course. Fall.

  
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    @SECD 373 - Middle and Secondary School Social Studies Curriculum


    3 Credit(s)

    Introduction to role of social studies in curriculum of junior and senior high school. Emphasizes philosophical bases for social studies in high school program, changing roles of social studies in American high schools (including New York State) since the 1920s, and various current schools of thought as to nature of secondary social studies. Explores contributions of social studies to a liberal secondary school education within democratic society. Spring.

    Corequisite(s): @SECD 393 .
  
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    @SECD 374 - Introduction to First and Second Language Acquisition Grades 5-12


    3 Credit(s)

    Introduction to theory, research, and practice in the fields of first and second language acquisition; understanding of language acquisition at various developmental levels, both within and outside the classroom; and application of language acquisition theories to instructional practice in grades 5-12. Spring.

    Corequisite(s): @SECD 394 .
  
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    @SECD 390 - Practicum in Middle School Mathematics


    2 Credit(s)

    Students will observe, tutor and teach mathematics in a middle school (grades 5-8). Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): EDLS 349 .
    Corequisite(s): @SECD 370 .
  
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    @SECD 391 - Practicum 1: Teaching the English Language Arts: Grades 5-12


    2 Credit(s)

    Field based experience in which students observe, tutor, and teach in middle school, junior high, and high school classrooms.

    Prerequisite(s): Learning Community I.
    Corequisite(s): @SECD 371 .
  
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    @SECD 393 - Classroom Observation in Middle and Secondary Social Studies


    1 Credit(s)

    Students will observe the teaching of social studies in the middle and secondary school. Spring.

    Corequisite(s): @SECD 373 .
  
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    @SECD 394 - Observation in Foreign Language Classroom Grades 5-12


    1 Credit(s)

    Pre-student teaching field experience involving classroom observation of foreign language teachers and learners in grades 5-12. Spring.

    Corequisite(s): @SECD 374 .
  
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    @SECD 410 - Middle or Secondary Science Field Experience


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides pre-student teaching field experience in secondary science in the B.A. and B.A./M.S.T. programs, or middle school (grades 5-8) pre student teaching field experience for students in the B.A./M.S.T. program leading to certification for Middle School and High School. Under the supervision of mentor teachers and the SUNY Potsdam course instructor, students will observe, design and deliver lessons in an assigned public school classroom. They will spend a minimum of six hours in the public school each week, and meet with the course instructor on campus one hour per week. After two weeks of observations and as approved by the mentor teacher, students will lead small group learning activities in the classroom. After one month and as approved by the mentor teacher, they will teach a minimum of two hours in the classroom each week. Partnership schools have been selected with three criteria in mind: 1) They have been selected because they provide mentor teachers who are actively involved in the current school reform movement; 2) They have been selected because they include diverse student populations representing multiple ethnic groups and/or include groups that traditionally have been underserved by schools; 3) They have been selected because for each, the school-college partnership is mutually beneficial, enabling the school district to progress in its school improvement plan, and enabling the College to provide a special opportunity to apply pedagogical learning in a meaningful context. Given these criteria, by enrolling in this course students are assuming a new level of responsibility in their education. They will be engaged by participating public school teachers in a manner to enhance the education provided to their students. This course is an opportunity to begin, in a small way, assuming responsibility to provide for the educational needs of students in the pre-college classroom.

  
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    @SECD 411 - Middle School Science Field Experience


    3 Credit(s)

    This course provides pre-student teaching field experience in middle school science education. Under the supervision of mentor teachers and a SUNY Potsdam course instructor, students will observe, design and deliver lessons in an assigned public school classroom. Students will spend a minimum of six hours in the public school each week, and meet with the course instructor on campus one hour per week. After two weeks of observations and as approved by the mentor teacher, students will lead small group learning activities in the classroom. After one month and as approved by the mentor teacher, students will teach a minimum of two hours in the classroom each week. Partnership schools are selected with three criteria in mind. 1) Mentor teachers are actively involved in the current school reform movement. 2) Partnership schools include diverse student populations representing multiple ethnic groups and/or include groups that traditionally have been underserved by schools. 3) The school-college partnership is mutually beneficial, enabling the school district to progress in its school improvement plan, and enabling the college to provide students with a special opportunity to apply pedagogical learning in a meaningful context. Given these criteria, by enrolling in this course students are assuming a new level of responsibility in their education. They will be engaged by participating public school teachers in a manner to enhance the education provided to their students. This course is an opportunity to begin, in a small way, assuming responsibility to provide for the educational needs of students in the pre-college classroom.

  
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    @SECD 455 - Student Teaching in the Middle/Jr. High School


    6 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Half semester of student teaching in student’s academic major in grades 7-9, under guidance of sponsor teacher and college supervisor.

  
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    @SECD 456 - Student Teaching in the Senior High School


    6 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Half semester of student teaching in student’s academic major in grades 10-12, under the guidance of sponsor teacher and college supervisor.

  
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    @SECD 457 - Student Teaching 7-12


    6 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Half semester of student teaching in student academic major in grades 7-12 under guidance of sponsor teacher and college supervisor. For Theatre Education students only.

    Prerequisite(s): DRAM 361  and DRAM 362 .
    Corequisite(s): EDLS 415  and EDUC 419  .
 

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