Sep 28, 2022  
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog 
    
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


@ = Indicates a non-liberal arts course. Please refer to College Credit Policies  for a description of non-liberal arts credits.

 

Art Studio

  
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    ARTS 330 - Painting II


    4 Credit(s)

    Open media painting course. Multiple approaches, both abstract and representational, are explored. Development of personal image vocabulary while refining technical and material skills. Development of intellectual capacity and ability to conceive, initiate and complete original work. Movement towards increasingly complex and mature work. Lectures and visual presentations address relevant theoretical, historical and critical concepts. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 329 .
  
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    ARTS 339 - Printmaking I


    4 Credit(s)

    Materials, theories and techniques of relief printing and intaglio printmaking. Emphasis on special qualities of intaglio and printmaking aesthetics. Lectures and visual presentations address relevant theoretical, historical and critical concepts. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 110  and ARTS 120 .
  
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    ARTS 340 - Printmaking II


    4 Credit(s)

    Extension and elaboration of ARTS 339  with increasingly more complex and mature individual projects. Continued development of individual aesthetic philosophy. Lectures and visual presentations address relevant theoretical, historical and critical concepts. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 339 .
  
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    ARTS 349 - Sculpture I


    4 Credit(s)

    This course introduces the use of sculptural form as a vehicle for a creative expression of personal ideas and contemporary concepts. It examines a variety of traditional as well as modern materials and processes. It emphasizes an awareness of the qualities of materials and how they can be employed to support aesthetic and conceptual objectives. Lectures and visual presentations address historical and theoretical concerns. Regular formal classroom critiques allow student to develop critical thinking skills. Regular formal classroom activities address historical and theoretical concerns and strengthen students’ abilities in aesthetic analysis. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 110 ,ARTS 120 , and ARTS 130 .
  
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    ARTS 350 - Sculpture II


    4 Credit(s)

    This course explores the design potential of welded metals as a medium for creative expression. An introduction to the lost wax metal casting process with the option for students to realize concepts in finished bronze casting. Additional options for materials, processes and concepts discussed. Theoretical and historical concerns addressed through lectures and visual presentations. Critical thinking and aesthetic analysis stressed in regular formal classroom critiques. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ARTS 359 - Ceramics I


    4 Credit(s)

    Design and creation of ceramic sculpture and wheel-thrown pottery, including preparation of clays, and introduction of glazing and firing of kilns. Lectures and visual presentations address theoretical, historical and critical concepts. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 110 , ARTS 120  and ARTS 130 .
  
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    ARTS 360 - Ceramics II


    4 Credit(s)

    Emphasis on creation of ceramic sculpture, sculptural pottery, and combined forms and techniques. Aesthetic and conceptual issues addressed in the context of assigned projects with subsequent critiques. Continued development of building, throwing, and glazing skills. Studio management skills including clay and glaze formulation, firing electric and gas kilns. Lectures and visual presentations illuminate theoretical, historical and critical concepts. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 359 .
  
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    ARTS 369 - Time-Based Media


    4 Credit(s)

    Time-Based Media is intended to introduce basic techniques and principles of producing creative video projects. This is accomplished by an introduction to the use of video cameras, digital editing work stations, and by creating time based visual images with tape and computer. The primary focus of instruction will be on the functional application of script development, camera use, and editing suite generating videotape presentations. Further investigation is achieved by the criticism, presentation, and analysis of these projects. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 321 .
  
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    ARTS 379 - Photography I


    4 Credit(s)

    This black and white FILM class introduces camera operation, film developing, print processing, aesthetic understanding, image creation, and photographic history. Creative problems are addressed using a variety of photographic techniques. Lectures and presentations address relevant aesthetic, theoretical, historical, and critical concepts. A 35mm film (SLR) camera with manual exposure controls is required. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 110  and ARTS 120 .
  
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    ARTS 380 - Photography Processes and Techniques


    4 Credit(s)

    This black and white FILM class concentrates on more advanced exposure, developing, printing techniques, and aesthetics. Alternative photographic processes are also introduced. Emphasis is placed on technical expertise, experimentation, and creation of a body of work using these various processes. A 35mm film (SLR) camera with manual exposure controls is required. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 379 .
  
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    ARTS 381 - Digital Photography


    4 Credit(s)

    This course introduces students to the processes of digital photography. The course covers camera operations, scanning, printing, and image adjustments using current editing software. While establishing technical skills, students will explore creative and aesthetic issues. Lectures and presentations address relevant aesthetic, theoretical, historical, and critical concepts. A digital (DSLR) camera with manual exposure controls is required. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 379 .
  
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    ARTS 419 - Interactive Media Design


    4 Credit(s)

    Introduces advanced techniques and theories of producing computer generated design. A variety of software packages, lectures, and exercises in creating visual images are used for instruction. The focus of instruction is on advanced theory, 3-D modeling and animation, and independent projects with criticism, presentation, and analysis of projects and portfolio development. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 319  and ARTS 369 .
  
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    ARTS 420 - Graphic Design Practices and Portfolio


    4 Credit(s)

    Capstone course for students wishing to become designers. The history of contemporary graphic design as well as theoretic and analytical strategies are examined throughout the course. Advanced techniques and principles of producing computer-generated art and design are covered with a focus on developing each student’s style and subsequent portfolio. Professional ethics and professional design practices underpin the entire classroom experience. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ARTS 431 - Painting III: Thematic R&D


    4 Credit(s)

    This course explores multiple formal and conceptual approaches to painting. Emphasis is placed on research of the theme or idea chosen by the student. Development of intellectual capacity and ability to conceive, initiate and complete original research. Students will investigate contemporary artists relevant to their own work. Movement towards increasingly complex and mature work. Broad exploration of the chosen subject of research. Critique based in contemporary visual arts practices and in a variety of other approaches will be applied. Lectures and presentations address relevant theoretical, historical and critical concepts. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 330 .
  
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    ARTS 432 - Painting IV


    4 Credit(s)

    In-depth development of one theme or idea determined by the student. Creation of a coherent body of work is emphasized. Movement towards increasingly complex and mature work. Development of intellectual capacity and ability to conceive, initiate and complete original work. Lectures and visual presentations address relevant theoretical, historical and critical concepts. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 431 .
  
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    ARTS 441 - Printmaking III


    4 Credit(s)

    Comprehensive investigation of individual processes introduced in ARTS 339  and ARTS 340 . Emphasis on thematic and individual approaches to printmaking. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 330  or ARTS 340 .
  
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    ARTS 442 - Printmaking IV


    4 Credit(s)

    Advanced level investigation of problems and materials dealt with in ARTS 441 . Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 441 .
  
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    ARTS 451 - Sculpture III


    4 Credit(s)

    Advanced welding and metal-casting techniques taught along with experimentation with various mold-making techniques. Personal imagery and more emphasis on student-initiated concepts encouraged. Any and all materials and processes can be explored. Historical and theoretical issues addressed through lectures and slide presentations. Critical thinking and aesthetic analysis stressed in regular formal classroom critiques. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 350 .
  
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    ARTS 452 - Sculpture IV


    4 Credit(s)

    Selected area of interest chosen for an in-depth exploration for a concentration on the sculptural possibilities of a particular process or material. Historical and theoretical issues addressed through lectures and visual presentations. Critical thinking and aesthetic analysis stressed in regular formal classroom critiques. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 451 .
  
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    ARTS 461 - Ceramics III


    4 Credit(s)

    A continuation of ARTS 360  with an emphasis on the development of a personal vocabulary of forms and stylistic concerns. Glaze formulation and firing of electric and gas kilns. Fall and Spring

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 360 .
  
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    ARTS 462 - Ceramics IV


    4 Credit(s)

    Progressively more advanced problems in the conception and execution of original ceramic forms. Ceramic formulae, empirical methods, and oxidation and reduction firing of gas and electric kilns. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 461 .
  
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    ARTS 469 - Digital Illustration and Imaging


    4 Credit(s)

    Intermediate level graphic design course intended to advance the student’s knowledge of the history of illustration, the theories of visual communication as related to illustration and the development of skills to make successful illustrative images. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 319 .
  
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    ARTS 470 - Media Arts Practices and Portfolio


    4 Credit(s)

    Capstone course for students pursuing careers as media and interactive designers. The history of the field is examined and the theoretical underpinnings of the field articulated through readings and discussions. Intended to improve conceptual and production skills of students through study of advanced techniques and principles of media art and design production. Professional ethics and design practices underpin the entire classroom experience. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 319  and ARTS 369 .
  
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    ARTS 482 - Photography IV


    4 Credit(s)

    Advanced level investigation of individual photographic creative ideas. Selected area of interest: film, digital, or alternative process, with an emphasis on independent thematic projects. Lectures and presentations address relevant aesthetic, theoretical, historical, and critical concepts. A digital (DSLR) or a 35mm film (SLR) camera, with manual exposure controls is required. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 481.
  
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    @ARTS 484 - Kiln Building


    1-4 Credit(s)

    Building and firing of Raku kiln, to be undertaken jointly by two or more students (2); individual construction and firing of a kiln of proven design (3); individual design, construction and firing of a kiln experimental in configuration (4). As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 461 .
  
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    ARTS 485 - Special Problems


    1-4 Credit(s)

    Individual program of work in student’s area of concentration, to be approved and supervised by a member of the art faculty. The successful completion of at least three semesters in chosen area of concentration is required. As warranted.

  
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    @ARTS 486 - Special Problems: Technical


    1-4 Credit(s)

    Individual program of work in student’s area of concentration, emphasizing technical problems and skills. Program must be approved and supervised by member of art faculty. The successful completion of at least three semesters in chosen field is required. As warranted.

  
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    ARTS 490 - Senior Art Internship


    3 Credit(s)

    This is a culmination experience available for each Bachelor of Fine Arts student. The course is designed to allow a student to explore opportunities in the allied professional fields of art. Students will become acquainted with the roles and responsibilities of art professionals in the student’s chosen field. This will also allow them to make more informed choices concerning their future.

  
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    ARTS 491 - Senior Art Thesis


    3 Credit(s)

    This is the beginning course toward the culmination of each Bachelor of Fine Art student’s experience. The course is designed to allow students to begin developing their individual creative personalities and begin research for the written thesis. The end product of this experience in the second semester is the showing of a body of work developed during the thesis process and shown in the BFA Exhibit or the delivery of another approved project. The Senior Art Thesis is the beginning of this process that will continue with Senior Art Thesis 2.

  
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    ARTS 492 - Senior Art Thesis 2


    3 Credit(s)

    The Senior Art Thesis 2 is the culmination of each Bachelor of Fine Art student’s senior experience at this institution. The course is designed to allow students to fully develop their individual creative personalities and complete research and writing of the thesis. The end product of this experience is the exhibition of a body of work produced during the thesis process and shown in the BFA Exhibit or the delivery of another approved project. The Senior Art Thesis 2 is the conclusion of this process begun with Senior Art Thesis. Spring.

  
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    ARTS 493 - Senior Exhibition Seminar


    1 Credit(s)

    The Senior Exhibition Seminar is a component of the Senior Art Thesis. The purpose of the Senior Exhibition seminar is to expose graduating Visual Arts BFA Majors to basic professional practices of exhibition preparation. The Art Faculty and Gibson Gallery staff will present seminars on topics such as object preparation, care and handling of works of art, exhibition planning, interpretation and statement writing, publication planning, publicity, lighting and installation. Spring.

  
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    ARTS 685 - Special Problems - Art Studio


    3 Credit(s)

    Individualized studio research in a selected art studio area. Project ideas developed on the basis of students’ needs and professional interests in conjunction with the instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): 34 undergraduate hours in art studio and permission of the instructor.

Basic Musicianship (Music Majors Only)

  
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    MUCB 100 - Introduction to Music Literature and Theory


    3 Credit(s)

    Development of analytical listening techniques and historical style analysis through integration of theory, aural skills, and applied writing. Overview of all historical eras and introduction to library research skills. Fall.

  
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    MUCB 101 - Keyboard Skills I


    1 Credit(s)

    Basic keyboard skills, including scales, chord progressions, improvisation, and beginning-level repertoire. Provides an introduction to the keyboard for students with little or no piano background. Fall.

  
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    MUCB 102 - Keyboard Skills II


    1 Credit(s)

    Provides an introduction to the keyboard for students with little or no piano background. Keyboard Skills 102 reinforces and extends the concepts covered in 101 with progressively more advanced material. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): MUCB 101  with a minimum grade of 2.0.
  
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    MUCB 103 - Theory I


    3 Credit(s)

    Fundamentals of pitch and rhythm, melodic analysis and diatonic harmony. Fall.

    Corequisite(s): MUCB 104 .
  
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    MUCB 104 - Aural Skills I


    1 Credit(s)

    Development of aural acuity through exercises in dictation and solfege. Fall.

    Corequisite(s): MUCB 103 .
  
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    MUCB 105 - Theory II


    3 Credit(s)

    Continuation of MUCB 104, modulation, secondary function, small forms and an introduction to counterpoint. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): MUCB 103  & MUCB 104 .
    Corequisite(s): MUCB 106 .
  
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    MUCB 106 - Aural Skills II


    1 Credit(s)

    Continuation of MUCB 104 , with longer dictation examples and introducing simple chromatic elements. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): MUCB 103  and MUCB 104 .
    Corequisite(s): MUCB 105 .
  
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    MUCB 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    MUCB 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    MUCB 201 - Music History I: Early Music


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WC credit.
    Survey of Western musical styles from antiquity through the mid-Baroque. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): MUCB 103  and MUCB 104 .
  
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    MUCB 202 - Music History II: Common Practice Period


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WC credit.
    Survey of Western musical styles from the high Baroque through the late Romantic. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): MUCB 105  and MUCB 106 .
  
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    MUCB 203 - Theory III


    3 Credit(s)

    Continuation of MUCB 105 ; chromatic harmony; 18thand 19thcentury forms and styles. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): MUCB 105  and MUCB 106 .
    Corequisite(s): MUCB 204 .
  
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    MUCB 204 - Aural Skills III


    1 Credit(s)

    Continuation of MUCB 106 , incorporating modulation, modal mixture, and other chromatic usages. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): MUCB 105  & MUCB 106 .
    Corequisite(s): MUCB 206 .
  
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    MUCB 205 - Theory IV


    3 Credit(s)

    Materials and analysis of selected styles of the 20th and 21st centuries. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): MUCB 203  and MUCB 204 .
    Corequisite(s): MUCB 206 .
  
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    MUCB 206 - Aural Skills IV


    1 Credit(s)

    Continuation of MUCB 204 , incorporating such 20th-Century vocabulary as whole tone and modal scales, octatonic material, as well as more challenging tonal exercises. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): MUCB 203  and MUCB 204 .
    Corequisite(s): MUCB 205 .
  
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    MUCB 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    MUCB 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    MUCB 323 - Music History III: Music Since 1900


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Survey of Western styles from 1900 to the present. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): MUCB 203  and MUCB 204 .
  
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    MUCB 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    MUCB 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    MUCB 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    MUCB 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Biology

Courses are offered each semester unless otherwise designated.

  
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    BIOL 100 - Principles of Biology


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB & LB credit.
    Three hours lecture and one two-hour lab weekly. One semester course providing an understanding of biological systems from the cellular to ecosystem level. Emphasis is placed on how biology plays a role in students’ lives. For non-majors only. Fall and Spring.

  
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    BIOL 101 - Evolution and Ecology


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB credit.
    Most introductory biology courses focus on cellular processes or human anatomy and physiology. Topics of ecology, evolution, and biodiversity are not explored in detail or omitted altogether. Evolution and Ecology helps students understand major biological concepts through the lens of evolutionary principles. This course takes a different approach to understanding biology, emphasizing concepts over details and scientific reasoning over terminology. Topics include natural and sexual selection, genetics, evolution of sex and mating strategies, population ecology, community ecology, macroevolution. For non-majors only. Fall or Spring.

  
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    BIOL 105 - Introduction to Human Genetics


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB credit.
    Human genetics, including transmission of genes, genetic ratios, chromosomal defects, sex determination, population considerations, introduction to DNA and gene functions, and moral dilemmas facing society. For non-majors only. Fall and Spring.

  
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    BIOL 106 - Environmental Biology


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB & LB credit.
    Concepts related to the physical and biological environments, populations and communities, current environmental problems. Laboratory and field experiences are an integral part of the course. For non-majors only. Fall and Spring.

  
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    BIOL 107 - Human Biology


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB credit.
    Emphasis on cellular function, nutrition, reproduction and other aspects of the body under normal and abnormal conditions. For non-majors only. Fall and Spring.

  
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    BIOL 108 - Vertebrate Life


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB credit.
    Life history of animals with backbones: evolution, distribution, behavior, anatomic adaptations, growth and development, and population dynamics. Special emphasis on vertebrates of North America. For non-majors. Fall.

  
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    BIOL 111 - Adirondack Ecology


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB credit.
    General ecological principles including energy flow, biogeochemical cycling, population dynamics and community ecology using the Adirondack region as a backdrop. Natural history and identification of Adirondack plants and animals will be incorporated. Laboratory and field experiences are integral components of this course. For non-majors only. Fall.

  
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    BIOL 112 - Connections in Biology


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB credit.
    Connections in Biology is a learning experience that connects the major concepts in biology to the life of the student. The connections will vary but will likely include issues related to human health, populations, genetics, and ecology. For non-majors only.

  
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    BIOL 116 - Behavioral Ecology


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB credit.
    Animal Behavior from the internal mechanisms to the evolutionary causes which led to them. For non-majors only. Spring.

  
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    BIOL 120 - Microbes and Human Welfare


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB & LB credit.
    Three hours lecture and one two-hour lab weekly. Morphology and physiology of microorganisms, their important in the cause of disease and their role in important industrial processes. For non-majors only. Fall and Spring.

  
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    BIOL 125 - Biological Concepts


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB & LB credit.
    Two hours lecture and one two-hour lab weekly. Biological Concepts is designed for students who are not science majors and plan to enter the teaching profession. There is an accompanying laboratory, which is required. The course is designed to provide students an in depth understanding of the major themes and concepts of biology including cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, biodiversity and ecology. Fall and Spring.

  
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    BIOL 145 - Biotechnology and Society


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB credit.
    An exploration of the science and history of biotechnology, with applications ranging from identifying genes to modifying the genetic material of whole organisms. For non-majors only. Spring.

  
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    BIOL 148 - Biodiversity Conservation


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB.
    Conservation biology is a multidisciplinary science with a focus on preserving the diversity of species and ecosystems. This course uses the Adirondacks as a case study to explore contemporary issues of climate damage, habitat loss, invasive species, pollution, population, and over-population. Conservation efforts in the Adirondacks provide a local and in depth understanding of the global issues and strategies to protect biological diversity on Earth. For non-majors. Spring.

  
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    BIOL 151 - General Biology I


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB & LB credit.
    The focus of this course is on cellular processes. Topics include cell structure, photosynthesis and respiration, cell division and genetics, and evolution. Lab required. Fall.

  
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    BIOL 152 - General Biology II


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB & LB credit.
    Evolutionary processes and resulting biodiversity, animal and plant morphology and physiology, and ecological relationships. Lab required. Spring.

  
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    BIOL 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    BIOL 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    BIOL 209 - Winter Ecology


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SB credit
    Interdisciplinary course which looks at all aspects of winter. At first the physics of seasons, snow crystals, glaciers, and temperature will be examined. Then plant and animal adaptations to the cold will be considered. Laboratory experiments will include: how plants and insects survive freezing and animal tracking. The last part of the course will cover human adaptations to winter including local customs and Eskimo cultures. Trips to Ottawa and the Adirondacks are planned. FW credit required. For non-majors only. Spring.

  
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    BIOL 210 - Intro to Anatomy & Physiology


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: LB & SB credit.
    Basic principles of human anatomy and physiology with special emphasis on the mechanisms of homeostasis and the interrelationships of structure and function. For non-majors only. Fall.

  
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    BIOL 279 - Careers in Health Care


    3 Credit(s)

    Students will explore different health care related careers. This course is designed for first semester Sophomores who are interested in a health care profession, but have not selected a particular path. Through interactions with professionals of different health care careers, students will learn what is expected in each career, what it takes to achieve that career, and develop an academic plan to achieve their goals. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 152  or CHEM 105  or CHEM 106  with a minimum grade of 2.0.
  
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    BIOL 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    BIOL 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    BIOL 300 - Ecology


    3-4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit with lab.
    Physical environment of terrestrial and fresh-water ecosystems, interspecific and intraspecific relationships, speciation, demography, growth and regulation of populations, energy flow, community organization and development. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 303 - Plant Physiology


    4 Credit(s)

    Biological processes of plants and the role various structures (cells, tissues, and organs) play in them. Relationship between functions and reactions of plants and those of other organisms. Significant research discussed. Lab required. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 304 - Sustainable Agriculture


    3 Credit(s)

    Lecture and active learning activities are designed to investigate topics vital to understanding agricultural sustainability, including issues of: land use, biological diversity, pest control, labor and human rights economic viability. Field trips to local farms will serve as examples of the various local agroecosystems. The class will document the differences between these farms and analyze them for their relative sustainability Class members will also grow crops themselves, to investigate tools for sustainability assessment. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 100 , BIOL 125 , BIOL 151  or BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 305 - Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates


    4 Credit(s)

    Similarities and differences in structural organization of vertebrate animals. Laboratory work includes detailed dissections of various systems of lamprey, spiny dogfish shark and cat. Lab required. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 309 - Marine Mammals and Seabirds


    3 Credit(s)

    This is an 18-day field course starting at the beginning of August at the Huntsman Marie Science Centre, St. Andrews, New Brunswick. Marine mammals and seabirds will be observed under natural conditions through frequent field trips at sea and shore. Passamaquoddy Bay and the Bay of Fundy are excellent locations for sighing harbor and grey seals, harbor porpoises, minke, fin, and humpback whales, and numerous avian species including Atlantic puffins, razorbills, black guillemots, and northern gannets. Further, a three day trip to Grand Manan Island will allow us to observe the incredibly rare northern right whale (there are only 300 in the world). There is a strong emphasis on field research and each student will complete an independent research project. Lectures and labs will introduce the evolution, zoogeography, morphology, ecology, physiology, and behavior of diving air-breathing vertebrates. Estimated cost is approximately $1,000 which includes travel to and from New Brunswick (from Potsdam), food, lodging, access to an on-site aquarium, and more than four whale and bird watching boat trips. For more info contact Dr. Jason Schreer (SUNY Potsdam), schreejf@potsdam.edu, (315) 276-2290. Summer.

  
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    BIOL 310 - Marine Biology


    3 Credit(s)

    Explores the diversity and ecology of organisms that reside in our oceans, bays, and estuaries. Examines physiological and morphological adaptations of marine life, including the specific adaptations and ecological interactions among organisms that inhabit the plankton, nekton, and benthos. We will also explore marine resources and the impact of humans on the oceans. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 311 - Genetics


    3-4 Credit(s)

    Principles of genetics, including classic Mendelian studies, chromosomal considerations and biochemical approaches to understanding the genetic material and how it functions. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 312 - Insect Ecology


    4 Credit(s)

    Study of insects: anatomy, physiology, development, behavior; social insects; and insect control. Systematic coverage of major insect groups. Lab required. Spring, alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 315 - Ornithology


    3 Credit(s)

    Study of birds with emphasis on field identification. Field trips required. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 319 - Evolutionary Biology


    3 Credit(s)

    Evolutionary Biology examines the mechanisms that have resulted in the rich diversity of life. Students will explore connections between natural selection and genetics, population biology, form and function, sexual selection, development, the fossil record and human evolution. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 320 - Microbiology


    4 Credit(s)

    Morphological, physiological genetic, and biotechnological concepts of Bacteria, Archaea, Fungi and viruses. Laboratory emphasizes sterile culture techniques and current technology. Lab required. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , BIOL 152 , and CHEM 105  and CHEM 106 .
  
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    BIOL 321 - Cell Structure


    3 Credit(s)

    Consideration of cells from standpoint of morphology at level of light and electron microscopes, cytodifferentiation, histochemistry and recent advances in cytological techniques. Fall or Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 322 - Introduction to Genomics


    4 Credit(s)

    This course focuses on the theory and methods of analyzing large genetic data sets and their application to biological problems, including sequence alignment and search methods, gene prediction, phylogenetic trees, and microarray analysis. Lab required. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 311 .
  
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    BIOL 325 - Morphology of Lower Plants and Algae


    4 Credit(s)

    Evolutionary trends, life cycles and economic importance of nonflowering plants. Recent changes in classification and systematics are presented. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 . Lab required.
  
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    BIOL 326 - Morphology of Higher Land Plants


    3 Credit(s)

    Interrelationships, life cycles, and economic significance of seed plants. Role of plant cells, tissues and organs in relation to biological processes of plants. Modern techniques in plant systematics are presented. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 . Lab required.
  
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    BIOL 330 - Natural History of Lower Vertebrates


    4 Credit(s)

    Life histories, systematics, behavior, ecological relationships, distribution, reproduction, and evolution of protochordates, fish, amphibians, and reptiles. Emphasis on species of the northeastern United States and Canada. Lab required. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 331 - Natural History of Higher Vertebrates


    4 Credit(s)

    Life histories, systematics, behavior, distribution, reproduction and evolution of birds and mammals. Emphasis on species of the northeastern United States and Canada. Lab required. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 333 - Biogeography


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Biomes of the world past and present. Emphasis on evolutionary, ecological and geographic factors and principles which determine distribution of plants and animals. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 334 - Biology of Woody Plants


    3 Credit(s)

    Identification and ecological and silvicultural characteristics, natural history, distribution and economic uses of native and introduced woody plants (trees, shrubs and vines). Laboratory exercises and field trips will include visits to diverse natural habitat types in the area, as well as the Botanical Gardens in Montreal and some private lands. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 336 - Biology of the St. Lawrence River


    4 Credit(s)

    A basic course in river biology. Topics will include aquatic and semi-aquatic plant and animal life, habitat composition and variation and various physical aspects of the aquatic environments. Emphasis will be placed on field projects. Summer.

  
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    BIOL 350 - Biotic Communities of South Florida


    3 Credit(s)

    Two-week field trip to south Florida during Winter Session to visit unique biotic communities including subtropical hardwood forests, pine-palmetto scrub, mangroves, coral reefs, and several freshwater wetland communities such as cypress domes, wet sawgrass prairie and deep water sloughs. Participants will see first-hand the ecological problems that beset this part of the country, including water diversion for agriculture, intense urbanization, and the introduction of numerous exotic plants and animals, and will meet with scientists and agency officials charged with management responsibilities for this unique region. Limit to 14 students. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 300  or instructor permission required.
  
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    BIOL 351 - Biology of Northern Ecosystems


    3 Credit(s)

    Intensive primer on the structure and function of ecological communities, focusing on ecosystems occurring in the northern forest and coastal regions of North America. The course will include an extended field trip to visit terrestrial, wetland, and aquatic biotic communities from northern New York through northern New England and the Canadian Maritime Provinces. Methods of sampling plants, invertebrates and vertebrates will be demonstrated. Individual plant collections will be required.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 . Summer.
  
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    BIOL 352 - Tropical Ecology and Conservation


    3 Credit(s)

    Two week field trip to a tropical region of the world during Winter Session to visit and experience biological communities and ecosystems present in these regions, including, but not limited to, rain forest, dry deciduous forest, savannah, freshwater wetlands, mangrove forest and coral reefs. Participants will see and explore in detail the conservation issues that occur in tropical environments and experience how different cultures propose solutions to environmental problems. Four two to three hour lecture periods will precede the field trip. Limit to 16 students. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 300  or BIOL 402  or instructor permission required.
  
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    BIOL 355 - Invertebrate Biology


    4 Credit(s)

    A survey of the invertebrate animals: their form, function, ecology, behavior and evolution. Lab required. Spring, alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
 

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