Oct 03, 2022  
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog 
    
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


@ = Indicates a non-liberal arts course. Please refer to College Credit Policies  for a description of non-liberal arts credits.

 

Biology

Courses are offered each semester unless otherwise designated.

  
  •  

    BIOL 360 - Neurobiology


    3 Credit(s)

    Morphology of neurons, synapses, spinal cord and brain stem; physiological factors: neuotransmitters, reex pathways, neuoendocrinology and biological rhythms. Fall or Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 375 - Behavioral Evolution


    4 Credit(s)

    Upper level animal behavior course with a laboratory. Primary literature and independent laboratory projects will help students understand the scientific process. Fall, alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 385 - Guided Biology Research


    3 Credit(s)

    This upper level course is meant to introduce biology students to independent research. One week students will go to the laboratories of participating faculty mentors to look at the types of research available in the department from: cell biology, physiology, behavior, and ecology. Once students have identified a faculty mentor, they will develop a project and work in that person’s lab doing research for three hours a week as well as participating in the weekly interdisciplinary group. This course can only be taken once, then students can continue research in BIOL 485 . Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 300  and BIOL 311 .
  
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    BIOL 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    BIOL 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    BIOL 400 - Field Ecology


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    A field-oriented course utilizing local terrestrial, wetland and aquatic ecosystems to illustrate and apply concepts presented in BIOL 300 . This course emphasizes making observations of the natural world, recording them systematically and generating hypotheses to be tested experimentally. Methods of collecting data will be presented and will include identification of local plants and animals. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 300 .
  
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    BIOL 401 - Advanced Exercise Physiology


    4 Credit(s)

    This course will provide an understanding of how the body responds physiologically to exercise and the anatomy that allows for these physiological responses. The course will also explore how the body responds to various forms of training under various conditions. In the lab portion of the course students will get hands-on experience with many of the key principles in exercise physiology. Lab required. Fall or Spring

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 402 - Conservation Biology


    3 Credit(s)

    The application of scientific principles to understanding and solving the conservation problems facing most of the Earth’s ecosystems and species. This discipline is both derived from and nested within such areas of biological science as ecology, wildlife and fisheries management, zoology and botany and draws heavily on expertise from physiologists, microbiologists, molecular biologists and population geneticists. This course will be a mix of lecture, discussions, field trips, lab and classroom exercises and one large project. Spring, alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 300  or instructor permission required.
  
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    BIOL 403 - Human Anatomy and Physiology 1


    4 Credit(s)

    Detailed structure and function of human cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems. The lab will focus on the anatomy of each system and on physiological experiments relating to several systems. BIOL 403 will focus on an introduction to human anatomy and physiology, cells, tissues, integument, and the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Lab required. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  and BIOL 152 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 404 - Human Anatomy and Physiology 2


    4 Credit(s)

    Detailed structure and function of human cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems. The lab will focus on the anatomy of each system and on physiological experiments relating to several systems. BIOL 404 will focus on the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive systems. Lab required. Spring

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 403 .
  
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    BIOL 405 - The Origin of Species


    3 Credit(s)

    This seminar course focuses on Charles Darwin’s seminal book, The Origin of Species. This book will be explored within the context of modern biology, including the topics of natural selection, phylogenetics, biogeography, and sexual selection. In addition, the book’s historical and sociological impacts and underpinnings will be examined. Spring, alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 300  and BIOL 311 .
  
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    BIOL 407 - Cell Physiology


    4 Credit(s)

    Metabolic reactions and physiology of plant and animal cells together with studies of molecular, biochemical, and histological aspects of these cells. Lab required. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 , and CHEM 341 .
  
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    BIOL 409 - Fresh Water Ecology


    4 Credit(s)

    Adaptations and ecological relationships of freshwater organisms. Physical and chemical properties of water will also be examined; Emphasis will be placed on local ecosystems such as Adirondack lakes, streams, and the St. Lawrence River. Lab required. Fall, alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): Pre-requisite BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 410 - Human Physiology


    4 Credit(s)

    Basic principles of human physiology, locomotion, digestion, respiration, circulation, endocrine and neural control mechanisms, reproduction, and biological rhythms. Lab required. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 413 - Neurophysiology


    4 Credit(s)

    Structure and function of nervous system including neural transmission, neurotransmitters, sensory and motor systems, the brain, behavior, and memory. Lab required. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 415 - Virology


    3 Credit(s)

    Basic physical, chemical and biological properties of plant, animal and bacterial viruses. Junior standing required. Fall or Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 418 - Microbial Diseases & Anthropod Vectors


    3 Credit(s)

    This course aims to highlight the pathogens and pests that plague humans, and is designed for students who are interested in medicine, microbiology, entomology, and evolution. The course will cover pathogen/host and pathogen/host/anthropod interactions, recognition and identification of vectors and disease, and an understanding of epidemiology. Spring, alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 320 .
  
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    BIOL 420 - Medical Microbiology


    3 Credit(s)

    Principles of immunology, pathogenesis, prevention and control of bacterial, fungal, viral and protozoan diseases. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 320 .
  
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    BIOL 425 - Techniques in Molecular Biology


    3 Credit(s)

    Experimental approach to structure and function of biologically active molecules in living systems and their integration. Instructor permission required. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125  and BIOL 152  and CHEM 341  and CHEM 342 .
  
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    BIOL 426 - Immunobiology


    3 Credit(s)

    Higher vertebrates immune response. Structure of immune system, cellular phagocytosis, antigen-antibody interaction, regulation of the immune response and immunological techniques. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 , and one semester of Organic Chemistry or instructor permission required.
  
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    BIOL 431 - Developmental Biology


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Fundamentals of embryogenesis using molecular, biochemical and organismal methods of study. Development of animals and plants will be considered, with emphasis on cellular and tissue levels of organization. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 125 , and BIOL 152 .
  
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    BIOL 440 - Comparative Animal Physiology


    4 Credit(s)

    Functions of organs, organ systems and entire organisms of selected vertebrate examples. Major topics: respiration and metabolism, osmoregulation, circulation, digestion and nutrition, sensory phenomena, reproduction and endocrinolgy, temperature regulation and adaption to various environments. Lab required. Fall or Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 311  and CHEM 341 .
  
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    BIOL 442 - Population Ecology


    3 Credit(s)

    Population Ecology serves as a second course in ecology. A population is a group of plants, animals, or other organisms, all of the same species, that live together and reproduce. While much of biology is centered on how individuals grow and reproduce - population ecology focuses on the population as the lowest common unit of life. This course will address the fundamental ideas of population and community ecology as they relate to size, composition, and distribution of populations and the processes that determine these attributes of populations. While this course focuses on the theories and mathematical formulations of population ecology, we must remember the goal is to better understand natural populations. Fall, alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 300  and MATH 151 .
  
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    BIOL 445 - Human Genetic Diseases


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    An examination of the inheritance and the molecular and phenotypic basis of human genetic diseases. Diagnoses, treatments, and societal implications of genetic-based diseases are also explained. Minimum requirement of Junior standing. Fall, alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 105  or BIOL 311 .
  
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    BIOL 455 - Molecular Genetics


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    An in-depth examination of the molecular aspects of gene control, including control of replication, transcription, and translation. Fall, alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 311 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 475 - Biology Laboratory Techniques


    1 Credit(s)

    Experience in laboratory instruction under supervision and guidance of staff member. 15 semester hours of biology and instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    BIOL 479 - Issues in Health Care


    1 Credit(s)

    All health care providers face dilemmas. Does a patient have the right to end their own life with the help of a physician? How far should technology be allowed to go in the treatment of patients? Who has the right to health care and at what level? Through readings, discussion, and the writing of position papers, students will learn about the ethical issues of health care. This course will also cover some of the factors students need to consider when applying to health care programs. A minimum of Junior standing required. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 311  or CHEM 342  or BIOL 320  or CHEM 425 .
  
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    BIOL 480 - Advanced Topics in Biology


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Individual and group study of problems in biology. 15 semester hours of biology required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    BIOL 483 - Current Topics in Biology


    2-3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Investigations of topics of current interest with class discussions and oral presentations. Topics vary from instructor to instructor. A minimum of Junior standing required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    BIOL 485 - Research in Biology


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Designing, performing, interpreting and summarizing research project under supervision and guidance of staff member. Instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): determined by nature of project.
  
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    BIOL 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    BIOL 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 100 - Chemistry


    3-4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SP credit; also FS credit for four-hour section.
    Selected chemical topics of biological, consumer and environmental importance. For students who need a firm base in the sciences, but who will not major in the sciences. Fall and Spring.

  
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    CHEM 101 - Chemistry and Human Health


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SP.
    Introductory chemistry course for students interested in health-related professions. The course examines how chemistry is vitally involved in almost every aspect of our life and explores several topics as they relate to human health including food, food additives and vitamins, fitness and health, drugs, toxins, green-house emissions, nuclear energy, herbicides and pesticides and global problems such as improper nutrition and diseases. The overall aim is to provide students with a good chemical and scientific background to be able to make informed decisions in an increasingly complex technological society. Online course offered in Summer and Winter Sessions. A good background in high school chemistry and biology required.

  
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    CHEM 105 - General Chemistry 1


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SP & LB credit.
    An introductory chemistry course for students majoring in a science curriculum or for students who wish to study additional science. Experience in high school science and mathematics is recommended. Laboratory required. Recitation offered at instructor’s discretion. Fall.

  
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    CHEM 106 - General Chemistry 2


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SP & LB credit.
    Continuation of CHEM 105 . Laboratory required. Recitation offered at instructor’s discretion. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 105  or equivalent.
  
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    CHEM 125 - Matter and Energy


    2 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SP & LB credit.
    This lecture course is designed for Early Childhood and Childhood Education majors. Matter and Energy is a physical science course which addresses the properties of matter, both physical and chemical, the various forms of energy and the interconnectedness of matter and energy. Laboratory required.

  
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    CHEM 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    CHEM 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    CHEM 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    CHEM 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    CHEM 301 - Fundamentals of Environmental Science


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SP credit.
    A one-semester, non-majors lecture course. After an overview of some science and environment fundamentals, a few issues of current interest are covered in depth. Issues recently covered include stratospheric ozone depletion, global warming, air & water pollution, and acid rain. One semester of college science required. Fall and/or Spring.

  
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    CHEM 304 - Chemical Laboratory Techniques


    1-2 Credit(s)

    Practical experience in assisting in the teaching of chemistry laboratories. At least one year of college chemistry and instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    CHEM 309 - Seminar in Chemistry


    1 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Continuation of CHEM 308 . The emphasis is on presenting a seminar from the chemical literature. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 308  or instructor permission required.
  
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    CHEM 311 - Quantitative Analysis


    2 Credit(s)

    Classical and modern methods of chemical quantitative analysis relevant to biology, chemistry, geology, environmental science, and physics. 2-credit laboratory required. Recitation offered at instructor’s discretion. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 106  or equivalent.
  
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    CHEM 315 - Forensic Science


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SP credit.
    The basic concepts and principles of forensic science are introduced. The purpose of the course is to teach the student some of the fundamental experimental skills as well as the theory behind them. In addition, some of the principles discussed in lecture are illustrated such as fingerprinting, fiber analysis, arson, explosives, glass analysis, and soil analysis. Spring.

  
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    CHEM 321 - The Sustainable World


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will examine sustainability and sustainable development from a scientific perspective. It will consider how we manage our resources, and the role of science and technology in moving towards a sustainable world. One semester of college science required. Summer or Winter Session.

  
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    CHEM 341 - Organic Chemistry 1


    3 Credit(s)

    Emphasis is on structure, reactions and reaction mechanisms of organic molecules. Various functional groups are considered while incorporating discussion of experimental methods. Laboratory required. Recitation offered at instructor’s discretion. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 106 .
  
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    CHEM 342 - Organic Chemistry 2


    3 Credit(s)

    Continuation of CHEM 341 . Laboratory required. Recitation offered at instructor’s discretion. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 341 .
  
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    CHEM 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    CHEM 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    CHEM 408 - Chemistry Topics


    1 Credit(s)

    The emphasis is on the use of the chemical literature, writing a scientific paper and participating in seminars given by invited speakers from academe and industry. Two years of college chemistry or instructor permission required. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): Two years of college chemistry, ordinarily CHEM 105  and CHEM 106  and CHEM 341  and CHEM 342 , or instructor permission required.
  
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    CHEM 409 - Seminar in Chemistry


    1 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Continuation of CHEM 408. The emphasis is on presenting a seminar from the chemical literature. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 408  and two years of college chemistry.
  
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    CHEM 415 - Instrumental Analysis


    2 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: lab section receives WI credit.
    Instruments and their use in chemical analysis, materials characterization, identification and imaging. Course is of great importance not only for Chemistry majors, but also for Biology, Geology and Physics majors. Laboratory required: experiments involve hands-on experience with spectroscopic, chromatographic, electrochemical and microscopic methods including Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Friction Force Microscopy. Recitation offered at instructor’s discretion. Spring.

  
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    CHEM 421 - Biochemistry


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: Recitation section receives SI credit.
    Chemistry of biological systems. Not currently offered.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 342 .
  
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    CHEM 425 - Biochemistry 1


    3 Credit(s)

    The study of biomolecules. Topics include protein structure and function, lipids, enzyme function and regulation, biomembranes and membrane transport, carbohydrates, nucleic acid structure, bioenergetics, and aspects of molecular genetics. Laboratory required: methods may include protein purification, molecular visualization, enzyme kinetics, chromatography, bioinformatics, electrophoresis, blotting, sequence analysis, and molecular genetic techniques such as DNA cloning, PCR, restriction endonuclease analysis and sequencing of DNA. Recitation offered at instructor’s discretion Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 342 .
  
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    CHEM 426 - Biochemistry 2


    3 Credit(s)

    A continuation of Biochemistry 1 topics with an emphasis on metabolism. Topics include the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, nuceic acids, and amino acids, integrated with the production and utilization of cellular energy. Other advanced topics may be included as time permits. Laboratory required. Recitation offered at instructor’s discretion. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 425 .
  
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    CHEM 433 - Inorganic Chemistry


    3 Credit(s)

    Descriptive inorganic chemistry based on physical and theoretical concepts. Spring.

    Corequisite(s): CHEM 451  or instructor’s permission required.
  
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    CHEM 434 - Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory


    1 Credit(s)

    A laboratory course in which the emphasis is on the synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds while using modern synthetic and instrumental techniques. Spring.

    Corequisite(s): CHEM 433 .
  
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    CHEM 444 - Advanced Organic Chemistry


    3 Credit(s)

    Modern methods of organic synthesis, including synthesis design, experimental aspects, and the total synthesis of natural products and other complex molecules.

  
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    CHEM 448 - Advanced NMR Spectroscopy


    2 Credit(s)

    The basic principles of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy will be introduced and discussed and selected experiments will be used to teach the basic skills needed to operate the instrument and to interpret data. More advanced topics, skills and experiments will follow. Laboratory required.

  
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    CHEM 451 - Physical Chemistry 1


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit (lab section only).
    Application of fundamental physical laws and theories to the study of chemistry, concentrating on gas properties, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. Laboratory required. Recitation offered at instructor’s discretion. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 104  and MATH 152 .
    Pre/Corequisite(s): CHEM 311 .

  
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    CHEM 452 - Physical Chemistry 2


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: lab section receives WI credit.
    Continuation of CHEM 451 , concentrating on kinetics, chemical equilibria and electrochemistry, quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. Laboratory required. Recitation offered at instructor’s discretion. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 451  or instructor’s permission required.
  
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    CHEM 462 - Chemical Spectroscopy and Reaction Dynamics


    3 Credit(s)

    An advanced physical chemistry course which focuses on photochemistry, chemical kinetics, spectroscopy and reaction dynamics. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 452  or instructor’s permission required.
  
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    CHEM 480 - Advanced Analytical Chemistry


    3 Credit(s)

    The objective of this course is to introduce the theoretical and experimental bases of new, modern analytical techniques including Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Friction Force Microscopy (FFM), advanced voltammetric techniques, the Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Nanobalance (EQCN), Stripping Voltammetry, Photoelectrochemistry and Spectroelectrochemistry. Practical applications of these techniques will be discussed as they apply to the following topics: measurements of forces between molecules, including antigen/antibody interactions, DNA hybridization, defective gene detection, characterization of new nanostructured materials, solar cells, corrosion studies and detection of heavy metals and pesticides.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 311 .
  
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    CHEM 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    CHEM 497 - Research Problems


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Laboratory research problem with direction of faculty member. Instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    CHEM 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Chinese

  
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    CHIN 101 - Contemporary Chinese I


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to introduce you to the basic linguistic elements of the Chinese language (mandarin) and help you understand and appreciate the Chinese culture. The first part of the course will teach you how to greet people, identify yourself, others and things, and how to compare. You will also start learning about writing, using traditional simplified Chinese characters. In the second part of the course, you will learn how to talk about yourself, and how to express your likes and dislikes. You will be able to read and write simple sentences. Every fourth semester.

  
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    CHIN 102 - Contemporary Chinese II


    3 Credit(s)

    This is a sequel to CHIN 101 . It is an elementary course designed for non-native Chinese speakers. It helps students to develop further communicative skills in Chinese. Speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills will be continuously improved and enhanced. Students will learn how to type Chinese text using pinyin input method. This course will also help students develop a further understanding of Chinese culture and society. Every fourth semester.

    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 101 .
  
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    CHIN 103 - Contemporary Chinese III


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: ML credit.
    This is the third part of the elementary Chinese course. The course is designed for non-native Chinese speakers who have completed CHIN 101  and CHIN 102 . In this course, students will learn to build vocabulary and sentence patterns in communicative contexts, and build a solid foundation in pronunciation. Students will expand their abilities to carry out simple conversations in Chinese on a limited range of topics. Reading and writing, simplified form, will be expected to speak, read, and write all new words that appear in the textbook vocabulary lists. This course will also lead students to deeper understanding of Chinese culture and society. Every fourth semester.

    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 102 .
  
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    CHIN 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    CHIN 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    CHIN 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    CHIN 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    CHIN 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    CHIN 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    CHIN 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    CHIN 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Communication

NOTE: Upper-division COMM courses require either introductory COMM course or permission of the instructor.

  
  •  

    COMM 105 - Survey of Human Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit; four credit option (with recitation) for FS credit.
    Various communication theories and applications. Topics: human and interpersonal communication, small group decision-making, public communication and the role of communication in professional settings. Fall and Spring.

  
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    COMM 106 - Basic Principles of Speech


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: FS credit.
    An introductory course in public speaking. It is a skills course informed by speech communication theory. Skills include analyzing the speaking situation, choosing appropriate topics, conducting research, organizing ideas, utilizing evidence and delivering speeches effectively. Special emphasis is given to developing critical thinking and listening abilities. Fall and Spring.

  
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    COMM 108 - Introduction to Mass Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: FS credit.
    Explores how historical contexts and current processes shape mass media as a part of American culture. Emphasizes critical thinking and oral communication exercises. Yearly.

  
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    COMM 120 - Film Foundations


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    An introductory course that looks at aspects of film history, criticism and production. It provides an overview of the moving picture as both popular culture and serious art form, and looks at its various elements. Students will have a chance to view and critique films and to participate in a creative project related to filmmaking. Cross-listed with LITR 120 . Yearly.

  
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    COMM 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    COMM 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
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    COMM 201 - Mass Media and Society


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA & SI credit.
    Explores the reciprocal influence between mass media and society. Focuses on understanding and applying media analysis techniques; arguing positions on controversial issues related to mass media. Fall and Spring.

  
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    COMM 206 - Business and Professional Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Introduces students to several business and professional speaking opportunities that they are likely to encounter in business and community. Through a combination of lecture, skills development exercises, assignments, and presentations students will not only develop a variety of communication techniques required in professional situations but also learn that communication ability and leadership are closely related. As warranted.

  
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    COMM 212 - Principles of Journalism


    3 Credit(s)

    History of journalism, emphasizing essential relationship to democratic society. Principles of reporting, news writing; processes of printing. Yearly.

  
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    COMM 245 - Interpersonal Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA & WI credit.
    Theoretical understanding and practical skills for examining and altering interpersonal communication. Yearly.

  
  •  

    COMM 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    COMM 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Independent study in speech communication, composition, literature or linguistics with faculty supervision. Plans for specific program must be approved by department chair and Dean of Arts and Sciences.

  
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    COMM 301 - Media Law and Media Ethics


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: PI credit.
    This course examines the legal and ethical dimensions of modern mass media. Students are introduced to various ethical theories and models, which provide a basis for the critical and systematic analysis of case studies and arguments. Students study current, relevant mass media law, emphasizing precedent-setting court cases in the United States. Topics addressed include: libel, slander, defamation, sedition, pornography, indecency, blasphemy, obscenity, privacy, intellectual property, copyright, propaganda, and commercial speech. As warranted.

  
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    COMM 302 - Multimedia Editing


    3 Credit(s)

    This is a class in critical thinking. Our field is changing rapidly; now more than ever, everything media editors do - selecting stories, clarifying sentences, checking facts, choosing words for headlines, writing cutline, exercising new judgement, packaging stories and images - involves the highest level of scrutiny. The best editors see beneath the surface of issues, always attempting ot make journalism more accessible and useful for audiences. At the heart of good editing is an understating of language, and editors must have a strong grounding in grammar, punctuation, style and usage. Through that lens, editors focus on issues big and small: Proper grammar and usage, credible facts and correct punctuation create clarity and trust, but they also save news organizations from accusations of insensitivity, bias, and libel. Strong skills in news judgment - asking the tough questions, making the tough decisions, always looking ahead - will help create the most trusted and sough-after publications. Counts towards Journalism minor. As needed.

  
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    COMM 308 - Writing for Mass Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: PI & WI credit.
    Focuses on ethical practices in research, writing and editing for various media and purposes. Basic news writing is emphasized. Intended to help students develop portfolios of published (or publishable) work. Yearly.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 105  or COMP 101 .
  
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    COMM 310 - Rhetoric of Advertising


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC.
    The objective of this course is to give students a better understanding of the rhetoric employed by the advertising industry and the numerous rhetorical strategies needed to connect the consumer to the product message. With a strong focus on Communication Theories, including Fantasy Theme, Symbolic Convergence, Neo-Marxist, and Feminist perspectives, students will cover as appeals, rhetorical appeals, and demographic and psychographic studies. Fall and Spring.

  
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    COMM 311 - Small Group Communication


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA, SI, & WI credit.
    Development of individual skills in decision-making groups. Focus on conclusions emerging from small group research concerning leadership, cohesion, roles and norms. Topics: analysis of controversy and group presentational skills. Oral class presentations required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    COMM 312 - Practicum at The Racquette


    1-2 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to provide students with practicum credit for dedicated participation in the full production of The Racquettestudent newspaper, a service to the College the requires extensive and demanding extracurricular hours. This practicum will help the committed student to better understand the concept of professional news production and publication, and to contribute both to the content of each issue and to the continuation of the tradition of the campus newspaper. Fall and Spring.

  
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    COMM 320 - Film Studies: Form and Culture


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Involves viewing a variety of classic and contemporary films while reading theoretical, critical and technical approaches to aesthetic, communicative, psychological, and sociological aspects of film in our history and contemporary experience. Some experience in aspects of pre-production is also provided. Yearly.

  
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    COMM 321 - Form and Expressive Techniques in Film


    3 Credit(s)

    Involves viewing a variety of classic and contemporary films analytically and critically, based on students’ developing understanding of expressive techniques in film production. Readings are drawn from many branches of film studies and approach film as art, text, and mode of communication. In addition to tests, course requirements will include: viewing all films and film excerpts shown in class, viewing one or more films in theaters, writing analytical responses and critical essays, and participating in class exercises. Some pre-production exercises (storyboarding, scriptwriting) will be required. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 120  or LITR 120 .
  
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    COMM 322 - Studies in Documentary Film


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    This course examines a variety of documentary films and develops students’ understanding of the special ethical and moral, social and political, as well as artistic requirements of documentary films. Students will create short documentary film on a subject of their choice. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 120  or LITR 120 .
 

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