Jul 05, 2022  
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog 
    
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


@ = Indicates a non-liberal arts course. Please refer to College Credit Policies  for a description of non-liberal arts credits.

 

Anthropology

  
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    ANTH 387 - Advanced Human Paleontology


    3 Credit(s)

    Human fossil record to be carefully scrutinized, including both evidence of the fossil record and assumptions that have historically guided our interpretation of the record. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 201 .
  
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    ANTH 390 - Classics in Anthropology


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is an overview of classic ethnographies written at different historical points and from different theoretical perspectives. As warranted.

  
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    ANTH 391 - Anthropological Theory


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    This course examines historical and contemporary theories in anthropology. It focuses on the relationship between ethnography and social theory and traces the genealogies of central questions about the nature of society and culture. In the first part of the course, we will discuss the intellectual frameworks of 18th and 19thcentury societal theorists in Europe and the emergence of anthropology as a discipline. We will then focus on the key theorists whose ideas shaped future anthropological inquiry into culture and humankind. We will also discuss how the works of these theorists have influenced contemporary paradigms in anthropology. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): Anthropology majors and minors only. A minimum of Junior standing required.
  
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    @ANTH 392 - Anthropology Teaching Methods


    3 Credit(s)

    Anthropological teaching methods will be designed to give students practical teaching experience in anthropology including lecturing, exam preparation, and laboratory teaching. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ANTH 393 - Professionalism in Anthropology


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    This course covers both practical and theoretical aspects of the discipline. Topics include ethics, careers, and preparation of resumes, graduate school and grant proposal applications. Fall.

  
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    ANTH 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    ANTH 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    ANTH 402 - Forensic Anthropology


    3 Credit(s)

    This hands-on class will explore techniques of the forensic anthropologist. Subjects will include skeletal identification of demographic characteristics, individual identification, forensic genetics, and the role of the forensic anthropologist. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 380 .
  
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    ANTH 403 - Advanced Biological Anthropology Research


    3 Credit(s)

    This course offers an exciting opportunity for students to conduct in-depth research projects in biological anthropology under the class supervision of the instructor. Students will be required to do background research, formulate hypotheses, test the hypotheses using hands-on data interpretation and analysis, and complete a final report (paper or poster) based on their findings. As warranted.

  
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    ANTH 410 - Advanced Archaeological Research


    4 Credit(s)

    This course offers experience with an in-depth research and analysis of field and laboratory components of real archaeological research. Experience the process of archaeological research from question formulation through data interpretation and presentation. A minimum of Junior standing required. As warranted.

  
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    ANTH 411 - Anthropology of AIDS


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    HIV infection and AIDS examined from a cross-cultural, relativistic perspective which looks at epidemiological, medical and socio-cultural aspects of this phenomenon. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 150 .
  
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    ANTH 412 - Seminar in Women’s Sexuality


    4 Credit(s)

    The seminar in Women’s Sexuality critically analyzes assumptions and biases in the literature about this subject. Using an evolutionary, biological, and socio-cultural approach, students research and present in class topics related to women’s sexuality across the life cycle and cross culturally. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 150 .
  
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    ANTH 415 - Archaeological Field Techniques: Supervision


    3 Credit(s)

    Participation in formulation of research goals and strategies and their implementation. Students design and complete research project involving collection and preliminary analysis of field date. Instructor permission required. Summer.

  
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    ANTH 416 - Archaeological Lab Techniques: Supervision and Analysis


    3 Credit(s)

    Advanced laboratory processing of archaeological data, with responsibility for supervision of the preliminary analysis of field data. Instructor permission required. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 316  or equivalent.
  
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    ANTH 417 - Archaeological Procedures


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI.
    This course provides hands-on experience in and exposure to the methods and theories of data collection and analysis commonly used in archaeology. 1-credit Lab required. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 204 .
  
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    ANTH 421 - Experimental Archaeology


    3 Credit(s)

    This advanced seminar in anthropology/archaeology examines the principles and practice of experimental archaeology. Each semester the course will center around a particular theme (food, metallurgy, watercraft, woodcraft, etc.). In doing so, students will learn to make and use a variety of tool types as well as workshop with professional craftspeople ranging from flint-knappers to blacksmiths. Using experiential learning techniques, this course challenges students to formulate and evaluate hypotheses by carrying our methodologies grounded in experimental archaeology. This applied learning environment will provide students with a hands-on approach to understanding artifacts and site formation processes. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 204 .
  
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    ANTH 430 - Applied Anthropological Methods


    4 Credit(s)

    This course will introduce students to the application of anthropological theory and methodology in real world situations. Field work experience will be an essential feature of this course. As warranted.

  
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    ANTH 432 - Native American Cultures


    3 Credit(s)

    A research seminar that will investigate the history of a Native American community, how it adapted to the changes brought on by European contact, and the community’s present social environment. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 130  or ANTH 202 .
  
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    ANTH 445 - Ethnographic Fieldwork


    3 Credit(s)

    Field course in scientific method, data collection and analysis, record keeping, and ethics of human research. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 391 .
  
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    ANTH 450 - Zooarchaeology


    3 Credit(s)

    Zooarchaeology introduces the student to the methods of animal bone identification. Using archaeological materials and computer-based instruction, it provides a basis for the interpretation and analysis of the complex animal-human relationship in the past. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 204  or BIOL 100 .
  
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    ANTH 455 - Cannibalism


    4 Credit(s)

    Cannibalism has been a controversial topic in anthropology for many years. The debate about the extent of cannibalism in past and in modern groups, and its meaning, has recently been reignited by the publication of several studies in the past couple of years that provide evidence of cannibalism as far back as Neanderthals and from pre-historic Native American groups. This course is designed for upper division anthropology students to study the history of cannibalism, and to evaluate and debate the possibilities raised in the recent literature. A minimum of Junior standing required. As warranted.

  
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    ANTH 457 - Dental Anthropology


    3 Credit(s)

    The human dentition is useful in many ways to anthropologists. Teeth are constructed of the hardest substances in the body and are often the majority of remains that survive digenetic processes through time. They reflect our interaction with the environment, whether through the mastication of food, or as tools in other activities. Cultures hold different conceptions of beauty based partially on the physical appearance of teeth. And, teeth are under relatively strong genetic control, which makes it possible to distinguish geographic groups of humans from one another. This is just a partial listing of the important anthropological information that may be gleaned from the study of teeth. As warranted.

  
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    ANTH 461 - Material Culture


    3 Credit(s)

    Thinking about objects and the ways that people make, use, understand, and engage their material worlds has become an increasingly interdisciplinary project involving cultural anthropologists, archaeologists, art historians, folklorists, literary critics, and historians, among others. In this course, students will consider the major ideas and approaches influencing this scholarship and will apply what they have learned in an original research project that explores the meaning of material culture. Special attention will be paid to how objects structure and are structured by human experience. As warranted.

  
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    ANTH 470 - Museum Internship


    3 Credit(s)

    Student interns are placed either within the Weaver Museum or off campus in a nearby gallery, museum, or historical agency. They conceive and set up archival projects, work at organizing Weaver Museum and departmental research collections and coordinate the activities of beginning student assistants (registered in ANTH 270  and ANTH 320 ). Instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ANTH 475 - Senior Thesis


    3 Credit(s)

    Preparation for completion of the Anthropology Senior Thesis requirement. Discussions on library research, the anthropological style and word processing to be included. As warranted.

  
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    ANTH 480 - Senior Seminar/Practicum


    4 Credit(s)

    Selected topics aimed at integrating anthropological concepts into future lives of graduates. Enables them to understand meanings of these concepts for personal, social, and career aspirations. Practicum provides students with the verbal and written opportunity to apply and elucidate anthropological concepts to their fieldwork and work experiences. Spring

  
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    @ANTH 490 - Internship in Anthropology


    3 Credit(s)

    Integration of anthropological concepts and methodology through work as research or administrative assistants with various local governmental agencies under supervision of a sponsoring faculty member. 12 hours of anthropology and instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    @ANTH 491 - Internship in Applied Anthropology


    3-6 Credit(s)

    The intern will apply anthropological methods, theories, perspectives, and data to meet the needs of a public or private sector organization. Potential projects may include evaluating and resolving social problems, implementing and analyzing public policy, or addressing the practical needs of community organizations or businesses. Students will work under the direction of a faculty member and a representative of the sponsoring organization. Interns will be expected to present their project at a department colloquium and a professional meeting or conference. Instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 305  or ANTH 430 , and either ANTH 393  or ANTH 319 .
  
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    ANTH 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    ANTH 495A - Special Topics in Museology


    3 Credit(s)

    Individual students design and execute advanced projects under advisement as a capstone to their museological studies. This may involve undertaking research on collection objects, carrying out basic research and feasibility studies for future exhibits, writing grants for programmatic funding, or preparing scholarly papers on their work for publication in the Collegiate Anthropologist or presentation before scholarly groups such as the Northeastern Anthropology Association, New York Folklore Society, etc. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTH 370 or 270 and ARTM 420  or ANTH 320 .
  
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    ANTH 496 - Applied Anthropological Research


    3-6 Credit(s)

    Students enrolled in this course will work under the direction of a faculty member to conduct substantive and original applied anthropological research. Students will demonstrate proficiency in qualitative/quantitative data gathering and analysis. They will present their research at a department colloquium or professional meeting. Depending on the extent and rigor of their project, students may enroll for 3-6 credit hours. This will be determined in a consultation with the student’s academic advisor or instructor. In general, it is expected that students will complete 40 hours of active research (design, data gathering, analysis, writing, assessment, etc.) for each 1 credit earned. Thus, the 3-credit option should entail at least 120 hours of active research and the 6-credit option should entail 240 hours of active research. This will be based on the research proposal that the student developed in ANTH 430  or a complete research proposal developed in another course. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 305 .
  
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    ANTH 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    ANTH 499 - Seminar


    3 Credit(s)

    Selected topics in cultural anthropology, linguistics, physical anthropology, archaeology or applied anthropology. Typically involves student participation in research project. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): 12 hours of anthropology and permission of instructor.
  
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    ANTH 615 - Archeological Field Techniques


    3 Credit(s)

    Through excavations in historical and pre-historical settlements in Northern New York, the principal methods of archeological field research are practiced. Independent research project and report culminate the course. Summer session.

    Concurrent: Ordinarily taken concurrently with ANTH 616 .
    Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing and permission of instructor.
  
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    ANTH 616 - Archeological Laboratory Techniques


    3 Credit(s)

    The results of excavation are preserved, prepared for analysis, and analytic techniques are demonstrated. An independent laboratory analysis project concludes the course. Summer session.

    Concurrent: Ordinarily taken concurrently with ANTH 615 .
    Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing and permission of instructor.
  
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    ANTH 698 - Tutorial


    3 Credit(s)

    Readings selected and assigned on the basis of the individual’s background, professional needs and interest.

    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

Arabic

  
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    ARAB 101 - Modern Standard Arabic I


    3 Credit(s)

    An introduction to speaking modern standard Arabic, to reading and writing Arabic script, and to Arab culture.

  
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    ARAB 102 - Contemporary Arabic II


    3 Credit(s)

    Sequel to ARAB 101 . Emphasis on the four communication skills, reading, listening, writing and speaking. Regular language practice in cultural context.

    Prerequisite(s): ARAB 101 .
  
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    ARAB 103 - Contemporary Arabic III


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: ML credit.
    Arabic 103 is a sequel to ARAB 102 . Students will develop their four communication skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, while being immersed in a cultural context, and using a modified version of Modern Standard Arabic (closer to the spoken language). This course will emphasize proficiency in communication on topics from everyday life and will foster reading ability of both classical and contemporary texts. The course features interactive methodologies, Arab music, art, and films dealing with contemporary issues of nationalism and colonialism, race, gender and religion.

  
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    ARAB 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    ARAB 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    ARAB 203 - Oral & Written Arabic I


    3 Credit(s)

    This course focuses on expressing yourself; telling about your experiences, expressing opinions and wishes, presenting persuasive speeches. Social roles will be practiced and many cultural topics will be discussed. Grammar will be systematically reviewed. Since class preparation will regularly entail written expression, the emphasis in class will be on oral expression.

  
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    ARAB 213 - Intermediate Conversation


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: ML credit.
    This course will offer opportunities for students to increase fluency and confidence in speaking, and to gain cultural understanding and cross-cultural competency. Communication will focus upon exploring needs, feelings, opinions, problems and plans.

  
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    ARAB 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    ARAB 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    ARAB 320 - Media Arabic


    3 Credit(s)

    This course concentrates on newspaper Arabic. Modern Standard Arabic is used for all journalistic purposes, regardless of the country of publication. Due to the formal nature of the language of the media, certain fixed phrases and set expressions occur and reoccur many times, expressions which are not used in everyday colloquial speech. This course systematically presents these formulaic expressions, rhetorical devices and appropriate vocabulary in an authentic context. The textbook will be used in conjunction with ancillary material gleaned from Arabic language newspapers and magazines. Students will prepare translation exercises on a daily basis, and will keep a scrapbook journal of news clippings gleaned from the Internet with a running list of new lexical items, an item critical to the development of newspaper Arabic Skills.

  
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    ARAB 350 - North African Literature & Culture


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC & XC credit.
    Using texts by North African writers, this course will explore the societies and creative expression of post-colonial North Africa. The course will provide historical, literary and cultural perspectives for understanding North African voices expressed in fiction, folklore, poetry and film.

  
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    ARAB 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    ARAB 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    ARAB 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    ARAB 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Art History

Courses are offered each semester unless otherwise designated.

  
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    ARTH 100 - Idea and Image


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit; 4 credit sections also receive FS credit.
    Introductory course in the appreciation and history of art. Covers painting, sculpture, architecture and other arts. Instruction in analysis of art works including such topics as color theory and perspective. Subjects include the pyramids, the Parthenon, the medieval cathedral, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Rembrandt, and contemporary art. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ARTH 101 - Survey of Art: Ancient to Renaissance


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WC credit.
    Major art styles and monuments of pre-Renaissance art; relationship between art and politics, religion, and economics in ancient societies. Course will also include some discussion of non-western art: the art of native peoples and of the east. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ARTH 102 - Survey of Art: Renaissance to Modern


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WC credit.
    Movements and classic problems in Renaissance tradition in art, from 14th century to beginning of 20th century. Emphasis on painting, sculpture and architecture. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ARTH 103 - Landscape Art


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC credit.
    Studies origins and development of landscape art, focusing on 19th century American landscape painting, and on Adirondack artists. Includes experiential component, consisting of landscape drawing and watercolor painting. As warranted.

  
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    ARTH 304 - Great Discoveries in Art and Archaeology


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines some great discoveries in the history of art and archaeology. Cultures studied include those in Africa and the Americas, and ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. Topics include discovery of tomb of Tutankhamen, invention of photography, excavation of Teotihuacan, Mexico, and Chinese bronze technology. Fall.

  
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    ARTH 310 - Greek Art and Architecture


    3 Credit(s)

    Origins and development of the art of ancient Greece, from prehistory through the Hellenistic period. Emphasis on the Golden Age of Greek art, the painting, sculpture and architecture of the 5thand 4thcenturies B.C. Fall, alternate years.

  
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    ARTH 311 - Roman Art and Architecture


    3 Credit(s)

    Architecture, painting, sculpture and minor arts from their early derivation from the art of Greece and Etruria to their flowering in a powerful and original expression of Roman culture. Spring, alternate years.

  
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    ARTH 351 - Late Antique Art


    3 Credit(s)

    Art forms and society of the late Roman Empire as represented by works of both pagan inspiration, based on artistic tradition of the Classical past, and those reflecting a newly evolving Christian iconography. As warranted.

  
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    ARTH 352 - Medieval Art and Architecture


    3 Credit(s)

    Evolution of medieval art from late Roman period to Gothic. Special emphasis on influence of religious and cultural developments and on artistic and architectural styles. Fall, alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTH 100 , ARTH 101 , or ARTH 102 .
  
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    ARTH 355 - Art in America


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AH & WI credit.
    Evolution of American art and architecture from Native-American and colonial times to present. Analysis of European sources and precedents. Major American ideas and attitudes expressed in the visual arts. Major artists discussed with special emphasis on architecture. Spring, alternate years.

  
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    ARTH 356 - History of World Architecture


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WC credit.
    Historical analysis of architectural trends from prehistory to the present. Special attention given to the concepts of mass, space and structure and their relationship to contemporary social movements. As warranted.

  
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    ARTH 358 - Cross Cultural Approaches to Art


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AC & XC credit.
    How can the term “art” be applied to a cross-cultural context? This course approaches the changing definitions of this category from both contemporary and historical perspectives. Our study will include material from four broad cultural areas in detail: Native American, Aboriginal Australian, African and Chinese. We will include consideration of contemporary artists. The course will address broad topics such as the ritual use of art, authenticity, aesthetics, tradition and modernity, art education, social memory, politics and creativity. Spring.

  
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    ARTH 365 - Art and Culture of China


    3 Credit(s)

    This course presents a critical approach to the relationship between art and culture in China. The course goal is to understand the forms, meanings and circulation of the Chinese arts from the perspective of its producers. The traditional arts of Imperial China will be approached chronologically from within several thematic areas. The primary focus in these areas will be the relationship between art and culture, with particular attention paid to painting produced in the literati or amateur artist tradition. The course examines issues such as the transnational circulation of Chinese artists, the representation of China’s ethnic minorities, and Western conceptions of Chinese tradition.

  
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    ARTH 381 - Classical Mythology in Art


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Course studies stories from Ancient Greek mythology and how they are represented in art from ancient times through the present. Course is arranged thematically; each theme will be examined in its original form (as far as can be determined) and then the representation of that theme in art is discussed, moving chronologically up to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the role of myth in each society, and on myth’s contributions to the art of the times. As warranted.

  
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    ARTH 385 - Art and Archaeology of the Classical World


    3 Credit(s)

    Art and culture of ancient Greece and Rome as reflected in the paintings, sculpture and architecture revealed by archaeological excavations at the great sites of Troy, Knossos, Athens, Delphi, Rome and Pompeii. Cross-listed with ANTH 352 . Fall.

  
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    ARTH 390 - Art Travel Seminar


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI.
    The purpose of this field trip is to study art and architecture; to study at first hand works in art galleries; to assess the quality of light and space in specific architectural settings; and to understand where and why patrons commissioned specific works of art. The course is designed to offer the students first-hand experience through travel and research. Independent visual analysis will be stressed in conjunction with memorization of factual material. As warranted.

  
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    ARTH 451 - Ancient Painting


    3 Credit(s)

    A history of ancient painting techniques (encaustic, fresco, etc.) and styles, beginning with the prehistoric cave paintings of Spain and France and concluding with works created in the eastern Mediterranean during the early Byzantine period. As warranted.

  
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    ARTH 454 - Early Italian Renaissance


    3 Credit(s)

    Proto-Renaissance in Florence and Siena. Style and effects of Black Death period; late 14th century and International style; and Renaissance of the 15th century, from Masaccio to Botticelli. Fall, alternate years.

  
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    ARTH 455 - Northern Renaissance Art


    3 Credit(s)

    Development of northern European painting and sculpture in 15th and 16th centuries. Special emphasis on late Gothic masters of Flanders and Germany. Spring, alternate years.

  
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    ARTH 457 - Baroque Art


    3 Credit(s)

    Baroque and Rococo art and architecture beginning in early 17th century Rome. Special emphasis on principal masters of Italy, the Lowlands, Spain, France and Germany. Fall, alternate years.

  
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    ARTH 458 - Nineteenth Century Painting


    3 Credit(s)

    Development of 19th century European painting from Romanticism through impressionism and symbolism. Fall, alternate years.

  
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    ARTH 462 - Impressionism


    3 Credit(s)

    Development of Realism and Impressionism in France with an equal emphasis on stylistic innovation and historical context. Fall, alternate years.

  
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    ARTH 463 - Italian High Renaissance


    3 Credit(s)

    Italian High Renaissance, especially works of Leonardo, Raphael and Michelangelo; and Age of Mannerism. Emphasis on High Renaissance, particularly in Rome: painting, sculpture and architecture. Spring, alternate years.

  
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    ARTH 464 - Foundations of Modern Art


    3 Credit(s)

    Principal stylistic inventions in visual arts beginning with Impressionist movement of 1870s and covering Expressionism, Cubism, Constructivism, Dadaism, Surrealism, Abstract art and related development to World War II. Emphasis on works on influential painters, sculptors and architects. Spring, alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTH 102 .
  
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    ARTH 465 - Issues in Contemporary Art


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Major premises and problems in development of post-modern visual arts since World War II. Emphasis on painting, sculpture and architecture, with attention to important innovations in other visual arts. Fall, alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTH 464 .
  
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    ARTH 490 - Seminar: Art History and Criticism


    3 Credit(s)

    Study and research on selected problems in history of art. Limited to art history majors. Instructor permission required. As warranted.

  
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    ARTH 492 - Senior Seminar


    1-3 Credit(s)

    This course is a requirement for Art History majors and must be taken in conjunction with an upper division art history course. Students will gain an understanding of the contributions of the principal figures in the development of Art History, during the Renaissance to the present. Students will learn about the main theoretical bases of Art History. Students will explore options for advanced education in the field of Art History. Yearly, usually Spring.

  
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    ARTH 691 - Readings in the History of Art


    3 Credit(s)

    Individualized study and research on projects and problems in the history of art. Project ideas developed on the basis of student needs and professional interests in conjunction with the instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): 31 hours in art history and permission of the instructor.

Arts Management

  
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    @ARMA 100 - Introduction to Arts Management


    3 Credit(s)

    Provides an overview of how arts managers bring together artists and audiences in ways that create mutually enriching cultural experiences; provides students with a solid understanding of the business practices necessary to successfully lead arts organizations; mixes reading and practical assignments to enable students to better understand arts management principles. Fall

  
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    @ARMA 207 - Arts Management Practicum I


    1-2 Credit(s)

    In this one- to two-hour practicum experience students engage in arts management activities and thereby learn and apply skills and knowledge in the field. Possible activities include engaging in costume shop work, scene design work, lighting, gallery management, fundraising, box office operations, artist relations, or production coordination. Arts Management majors must successfully complete a minimum of two credits in ARMA 207. This course can be taken more than once. Fall and Spring.

  
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    @ARMA 300 - Marketing and Public Relations in the Arts


    3 Credit(s)

    Marketing Theory and Public Relations are essential to modern arts management. This course examines the history of both and their role in consumer relations. Market research and the aspects of developing strategies will be studied during the first half of the semester. The second half of the course will explore multiple areas of Public Relations communication including: research, development and writing as well as distribution. The coursework will include lecture, discussion, videos, class exercises and writings, observation, and group projects. Fall

    Prerequisite(s): ARMA 100  
  
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    @ARMA 307 - ARTS MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM II


    1-2 Credit(s)

    In this one- to two-hour practicum experience students follow up on ARMA 207  by engaging in additional, higher-responsibility arts management activities, thereby learning and applying arts management skills and knowledge. Possible tasks include production coordination; assisting with grant applications; hosting visiting artists; or coordinating student workers at the Gibson Gallery, the scene design shop, or the box office. Arts Management majors must successfully complete a minimum of two credits in ARMA 307. This course can be taken more than once.  Fall and Spring

    Prerequisite(s): ARMA 207  
  
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    @ARMA 310 - Arts Grant Writing and Fundraising


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    An essential aspect of arts management is obtaining the funds with which to produce the discipline in which you work. Grants are an important piece of every non-profit’s financial plan. The ability to write a good grand proposal is highly valued. Also crucial to non-profit sustainability are donations. This course examines both forms of obtaining revenue and culminates with the creation of actual grant proposals. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARMA 100 .

Art Studio

  
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    ARTS 107 - Introduction to Watercolor


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE credit.
    Provides both art majors and non-majors with a hands-on introductory experience in the art medium of watercolor. Basic drawing, composition and color theory will be introduced. Traditional watercolor techniques and materials will be covered. Master works by major watercolor artists will be analyzed. As warranted.

  
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    ARTS 109 - Introductory Studio Art


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE credit.
    Provides non-art majors with hands-on experience in the studio areas of drawing, color and design. Introduces the concepts and processes necessary to make art. Theoretical, critical and historical issues of art majors addressed through regular group critiques and slide presentations of both historical and contemporary art work. Fall.

  
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    ARTS 110 - Foundations of Drawing I


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE credit.
    Introduces both art majors and non-art majors to the concepts and processes of the medium of drawing. Theoretical, critical and historical issues of art making addressed through regular group critiques and visual presentations of both historical and contemporary art work. Emphasizes perceptual drawing with still life and figure work. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ARTS 120 - Color and Design


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE credit.
    Provides both art and non-art majors with hands-on experience in color and design. Introduces the basic visual elements and design principles used in art making including areas of painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, ceramics and sculpture. Theoretical, critical and historical issues of art making addressed through group critique and visual presentations of both historical and contemporary art work. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ARTS 130 - Three-Dimensional Design


    4 Credit(s)

    Focusing on a wide variety of construction and fabrication techniques, this course introduces art majors to the creation of three-dimensional artworks. Theoretical, critical and historical issues of art making addressed through group critique and presentations on both historical and contemporary artwork. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ARTS 140 - Ceramic Survey


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE credit.
    Design and creation of ceramic sculpture and wheel-thrown pottery, including preparation of clays and introduction to glazing and firing of kilns. Students encouraged to realize their personal concepts and express their ideas in effective visual communication. Theoretical, critical and historical issues of art making addressed through group critiques and visual presentations of both historical and contemporary art work. Non-majors only. As warranted.

  
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    ARTS 141 - Sculpture Survey


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE credit.
    Non-majors only, no prerequisite. Introduces variety of materials and processes such as clay modeling, woodcarving, assemblage, casting methods and direct plaster work. Students select appropriate methods to pursue the realization of their creative concepts. Historical and theoretical issues addressed through lectures and slide presentations. Exposure to critical thinking and aesthetic analysis during regularly scheduled classroom critiques. As warranted.

  
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    ARTS 142 - Basic Photography


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AE credit.
    No previous art training required. This course addresses creative problems in photography with an emphasis on design and visual elements. Camera functions, image manipulation, and printing techniques will be introduced. Lectures and presentations address relevant theoretical and historical concepts. A camera is required. As warranted.

    Note: Environmental Studies First-Year Interest Group class requires a digital camera. Other classes could be digital or film based. Contact professor for camera requirements.
  
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    ARTS 143 - Desktop Publishing Design


    3 Credit(s)

    Desktop Publishing Design is intended to introduce basic techniques and principles of producing computer generated publication design. This is accomplished by an introduction to a variety of software packages, lectures, and by creating publishing projects with the computer. The primary focus of instruction will be on functional applications such as brochures, posters, and presentations. Further investigation is achieved by the criticism, presentation, and analysis of these projects. As warranted.

  
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    ARTS 144 - Art of Handmade Paper


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of hand papermaking. In this course students will learn about the materials, skills, and techniques for making paper as well as the many creative possibilities for its use. Through hands-on experience, students will learn to make paper from both natural and recycled fibers using a technology that can be duplicated outside of the classroom. This course is valuable for both art majors and non-majors, both beginning students and students with some experience in the visual arts.

  
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    ARTS 211 - Foundations of Drawing II


    4 Credit(s)

    Continues to develop and broaden students’ technical and material drawing skills. Expands the concept of drawing. Explores multiple formal and conceptual approaches to drawing using both abstract and representational modes. Introduction of color. Development of personal image vocabulary. Lectures and visual presentations address relevant theoretical, historical and critical concepts. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 110 .
  
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    ARTS 312 - Drawing and Mixed Media


    4 Credit(s)

    Further refines technical and material skills of drawing while exploring personal content. Development of multiple series of drawing work. Development of intellectual capacity and ability to conceive, initiate and complete original work. In-depth exploration of techniques, themes and concepts. Lectures and visual presentations address relevant theoretical, historical and critical concepts. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 211 .
  
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    ARTS 319 - Graphic Design and Media Arts I


    4 Credit(s)

    This course introduces basic techniques and principles of producing computer generated design. This is accomplished by an introduction to a variety of software packages, lectures, and by creating visual images. The primary focus of instruction will be on functional applications of the digital medium with criticism, presentation, and analysis of projects. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 110  and ARTS 120 .
  
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    ARTS 320 - Typography


    4 Credit(s)

    This course introduces the history of type, the history of type design and the use and manipulation of type in the context of producing computer-generated art and design. Theories of visual communication are introduced throughout the course and the critical analysis of historical type products as well as student projects are major course components. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 319 .
  
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    ARTS 321 - Graphic Design and Media Arts II


    4 Credit(s)

    Graphic Design and Media Arts II introduces intermediate techniques and principles of producing computer generated design. A variety of software packages, lectures, and creating visual images are used for instruction. The focus of instruction is on vector drawing, photo manipulation, web design, and advanced page design with criticism, presentation, analysis of projects and portfolio development. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 110  and ARTS 120 .
  
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    ARTS 329 - Painting I


    4 Credit(s)

    Materials, theories, and techniques of oil painting, with limited exploration of mixed media possible. Emphasis on perceptual painting with still life and figure work. Emphasis on color and composition. Lectures and visual presentations address relevant theoretical, historical and critical concepts. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 110  and ARTS 120 .
 

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