May 20, 2022  
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog 
    
2018-2019 SUNY Potsdam Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


@ = Indicates a non-liberal arts course. Please refer to College Credit Policies  for a description of non-liberal arts credits.

 

Dance

Courses are offered each semester unless otherwise designated.

  
  •  

    DANC 497 - Special Projects: Costume Design


    1-3 Credit(s)

    Advanced independent study in costume design for dance or theatre productions. Instructor permission required. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): DRAM 331 .
  
  •  

    DANC 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Economics

  
  •  

    ECON 105 - Principles of Microeconomics


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    This course examines theory of prices, efficient allocation of resources, distribution of income, and practices of business, labor organizations, and government. Students need not take ECON 105 and ECON 110  in sequence. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ECON 110 - Principles of Macroeconomics


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    This course focuses on government finance, money and banking, income and employment, international economics and growth theories. Students need not take ECON 105  and 110 in sequence. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ECON 120 - The Modern Economy


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    The development of capitalism is traced from its origins in medieval society to the present day. The transitions examined include: the transformation from traditional to market based economy, the industrial revolution, economic crises, such as the Great Depression, and the expanded role of government. The course is concerned with these events themselves and with hour economists explain them. It concludes with contemporary economic issues such as underdevelopment, globalization and the ecological overload created by the expanding economy. Fall, odd years.

  
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    ECON 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    ECON 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    ECON 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    ECON 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    ECON 300 - Statistical Methods in Economics and Business


    0-3 Credit(s)

    This course discusses nonparametric techniques analysis of variance, estimation, hypothesis testing prediction, and forecasting. It introduces applications of these methods in economics and business. Fall, even years.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105  and ECON 110 .
  
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    ECON 302 - The Global Economy


    3 Credit(s)

    A policy-oriented examination of current events in international economic relations. Topics include global economic interdependence; the politics and economics of U.S. trade policy; regional trading blocs; European monetary union; reform in transitional economies; U.S.-Japan and U.S.-E.U. economic relations; roles of the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, and World Trade Organization; and debt burdens of developing countries. A background in economics is not required. A minim of Sophomore standing required. Formerly Changing World Economy. Fall.

  
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    ECON 306 - United States Economic History


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: AH credit.
    The course examines the transformation of economic institutions over the course of United States history. Topics include industrialization and technological change, the development of the financial system, the evolution of business and labor organizations, the business cycle of prosperity and depression, the changing rolls of government in the economy and of the United States in the world economy. A minimum of Sophomore standing required. Spring, even years.

  
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    ECON 311 - European Economic History


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WC credit.
    This course examines the economic development of Europe from the Middle Ages to the early twentieth century, with primary emphasis on the Industrial Revolution to World War I in Britain, France and Germany. It also studies the organization of economic activity; the role of the state and entrepreneurs; workers and labor institutions; commercial policy, monetary systems; property rights; and the process of capital accumulation. A minimum of Sophomore standing required. As warranted.

  
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    ECON 316 - Comparative Economic Systems


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SA credit.
    The course examines different forms of Economic Organization including major types of advanced capitalism, different transition paths of former socialist countries and alternative approaches to development. These are considered both theoretically and empirically. A minimum of Sophomore standing required. As warranted.

  
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    ECON 320 - Economy and Environment


    3 Credit(s)

    The course compares different economic explanations of environmental degradation. It shows how these alternative theories provide the foundation for alternative approaches to environmental policy. Finally, it evaluates the environmental impact of specific areas of economic activity, such as agriculture, energy use and international trade. A minimum of Sophomore standing required. Spring.

  
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    ECON 321 - Economic Development of Nations


    3 Credit(s)

    This course analyzes theories of economic development and planning. It also covers other economic factors such as population growth, labor, capital, and technology. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105  and ECON 110 .
  
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    ECON 326 - Current Economic Policy


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    This course examines major economic problems facing the United States. It also focuses on policy proposals for dealing with these economic challenges. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105  or ECON 110 .
  
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    ECON 340 - Health Economics


    3 Credit(s)

    This course studies how to apply microeconomic tools to analyze health and medical care issues. It starts with the special features of healthcare as a commodity, the demand for health and medical care services, and the functioning of insurance markets. Then the course turns to the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers such as hospitals and physicians, the special features of the health care labor market, and the behavior of the pharmaceutical industry. The course also examines the role of and economic justification for government involvement in the medical care system. Finally, it uses economic tools to compare different healthcare systems in the world and review and analyze various proposals for health care reform in US. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105 .
  
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    ECON 355 - Intermediate Microeconomics


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines pricing and resource allocation, theories of demand and supply, and price determination in competitive and noncompetitive markets. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105 .
  
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    ECON 360 - Intermediate Macroeconomics


    3 Credit(s)

    This course focuses on employment, output, and income determination. It also analyzes problems associated with short-run cyclical fluctuations and stabilization policy. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 110 .
  
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    ECON 365 - History of Economic Thought


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: PI & SA credit.
    This course deals with major economists and schools of economic thought from the earliest economic theorists to the present. It also describes how some economists have influenced the development of various economic systems. A minimum of Junior standing required. Fall, even years.

  
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    ECON 380 - Introduction to Econometrics


    3 Credit(s)

    This course discusses basic statistical and mathematical concepts used in economic modeling. It covers two variable regression methods, multiple-variable regression methods and simultaneous-equation methods. Topics covered include: regression estimation, classical normality assumption, non-linear randomness, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, econometric inferences, the goodness of fit, and econometric model specifications. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105  and ECON 110 .
  
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    ECON 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    ECON 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    ECON 401 - Financial Economics


    3 Credit(s)

    The objective of this course is the study of theoretical foundations of modern financial economics. The course provides a survey of financial resource allocation over time under conditions of risk and uncertainty. The course will cover the general principles of modern finance including the time value of money, risk, insurance, capital market equilibrium and asset valuation, and asset pricing theory. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105  and ECON 110 .
  
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    ECON 420 - Labor Economics


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines the demand and supply of human resources including labor force participation and trends, compensation and wage determination, investments in human capital, worker mobility, union and collective bargaining in the private and public sectors. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105 .
  
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    ECON 431 - Urban and Regional Economics


    3 Credit(s)

    This course explores the way in which a city is analyzed from an economic perspective. It considers economic theories of location and spatial distribution. The course also draws on these theories to analyze the economic aspects of urban problems such as neighborhood decay, poverty, substandard housing, urban sprawl, housing segregation, traffic congestion, and crime. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105  and ECON 110 .
  
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    ECON 441 - Money and Banking


    3 Credit(s)

    This is a study of the theory of money and its role in the modern economy. It also focuses on determinants of the supply of money and credit. Finally, it evaluates monetary and stabilization policies. Spring, even years.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105  and ECON 110 .
  
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    ECON 450 - International Economics


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines international trade theories, the mechanics of international trade payments, the determination of exchange rates, and methods and objectives of trade control.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105  and ECON 110 .
  
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    ECON 451 - International Trade


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: ISE credit.
    Theories of international trade. Analysis of the normative aspects of trade including the gains from trade and the effect of trade on employment and economic welfare. Examination of international trade policy and issues of economic integration, economic growth, and current trade problems. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105  and ECON 110 .
  
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    ECON 452 - International Finance


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: ISE credit.
    Balance of payments theory including balance of payments accounting and foreign exchange market; theoretical models of fixed and flexible exchange rate systems using both Neoclassical and Keynesian approaches. Historical evolution of the international monetary system. Current international monetary policies and problems. As warranted.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105  and ECON 110 .
  
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    ECON 460 - Industrial Organization


    3 Credit(s)

    This course includes analysis and case study applications of the structure, behavior and social performance of industries. Topics include industrial concentration, entry barriers, price fixing, advertising and technology. Fall, even years.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105  and ECON 110 .
  
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    ECON 470 - Economics of the Public Sector


    3 Credit(s)

    This course evaluates the government budget according to criteria of efficiency, equity, and ease of administration. It also explains expenditures and taxes as tools for economic stabilization and growth. Fall, odd years.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105  and ECON 110 .
  
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    ECON 492 - Senior Seminar


    1 Credit(s)

    Individual investigations of economics and the economy that are selected to help students to integrate the subfields, skills and perspectives of the major. Students are engaged in gathering, interpreting and presenting relevant economics knowledge. Senior standing and instructor permission required.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105  and ECON 110 .
  
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    ECON 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    ECON 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    ECON 499 - Junior/Senior Seminar


    3 Credit(s)

    This course includes individual and group investigations of economic problems that are selected to meet the interests and needs of the class. Students practice gathering, interpreting and presenting relevant data. Junior or Senior standing required.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 105  and ECON 110 .

Education

Where possible, the academic term the course is generally taught has been provided. For courses where no specific term of teaching is provided, students should contact the chair of the department, the Center for Graduate Studies or their adviser for guidance.

  
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    EDUC 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    EDUC 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    EDUC 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    EDUC 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    @EDUC 303 - Creative/Sensory Experience/Young Children B-2


    3 Credit(s)

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with knowledge of the development of creative, affective and sensory expression in young children ages 3 to 6. In conjunction with accompanying field experience, students plan and implement child-centered integrated learning experiences in play, music, drama and art based on developmental needs of children. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): EDLS 306 , EDUC 308 , EDUC 310 , EDUC 312  & 314.
    Corequisite(s): @EDUC 407 , @EDUC 408 , @EDUC 409  & @EDUC 411 .
  
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    @EDUC 308 - Practicum I


    1 Credit(s)

    This pre-student teaching field experience will focus on child development, learning theories, special learning needs and the classroom environment. Components will include, but are not limited to observation, small group work, and at least one large group lesson.

    Prerequisite(s): EDLS 201  & EDLS 207 .
    Corequisite(s): @EDUC 310  and @EDUC 312  and EDLS 306  and EDLS 314  .
  
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    @EDUC 310 - Childhood/Early Childhood Mathematics Methods: PK-6


    3 Credit(s)

    Elementary Methods is a course designed to prepare students to teach mathematical concepts and skills in grades PK-6. Based on research, the NCTM and NAEYC Standards, pre-service teachers will learn how to help children in elementary and middle school develop their basic mathematics skills through understanding and practicing. They will also learn how to develop mathematical reasoning and problem solving skills. Simultaneously, the PK-6 mathematics curriculum will be reviewed to increase the knowledge base and the confidence level of the future teacher. Students will be introduced to current issues in mathematics education such as the Common Core Standards, the use of technology and manipulative materials, interdisciplinary education, performance assessment and constructivism. They will learn to develop lessons that meet the New York State Common Core Standards. A practicum in local elementary schools will provide students an opportunity to apply the concepts learned. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): EDLS 201  & EDLS 207 .
    Corequisite(s): EDLS 306  and EDLS 314  and @EDUC 308 , and @EDUC 312 .
  
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    @EDUC 312 - Childhood/Early Childhood Social Studies Methods: PK-6


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to prepare students for their field experiences and edTPA by introducing them to the theoretical and practical aspects of planning, implementing and assessing student learning using an integrated and interdisciplinary approach to social studies instruction Pre-K through sixth grade. The 2015 NYS Social Studies Framework, its Tool Kit, the inquiry Design Model and their alignment with the ELA Common Core provide the basis for course work in students explore and demonstrate the fundamentals of lesson planning using Cooperative Learning, Bloom’s Taxonomy, the Effective Teaching Model, Gardner’s Multiple intelligences Theory and research-based critical thinking and literacy strategies to develop reading, writing, speaking and listening skills and strengthen academic language, language function and other language demands in the content area. Students will also practice with and create their own assessment tools and provide feedback using task sheets and rubrics. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): EDLS 201  and EDLS 207 .
    Corequisite(s): EDLS 306  and EDLS 314  and @EDUC 308  and @EDUC 310 .
  
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    EDUC 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    EDUC 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    @EDUC 406 - Early Childhood Literacy II


    3 Credit(s)

    A continuation of Early Childhood Literacy I. Knowledge and application of literacy instructional strategies are refined and preservice teachers have the opportunity to apply what they have learned in an actual instructional setting (Birth - grade 2).

    Prerequisite(s): Block I.
    Corequisite(s): EDUC 402, 404, and 405.
  
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    @EDUC 407 - Integrated Literacy


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to provide the prospective elementary teacher with opportunities to review and expand upon the information presented in EDLS 207  and EDLS 306 . In a simulated classroom setting students will use quality children’s literature, effective literacy strategies, and integrated science/literacy lessons to model balanced literacy instruction. Science/literacy lessons will be created citing the NYS ELA Common Core Standards, along with various forms of assessment to measure instruction and evaluate individual progress while managing the classroom environment. Students will further explore how the use of children’s literature with effective literacy strategies can promote the literacy development of English Language Learners. This course is part of the Childhood/Early Childhood Education Program’s Block II Field Experience in which students will complete 70+ hours of classroom field experience at a designated professional development school. This course is taught in conjunction with the methods courses Elementary Science Methods (@EDUC 409 ) and Foundations of Classroom Behavior (@EDUC 411 ). Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): EDLS 306 .
  
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    @EDUC 408 - Practicum II


    2 Credit(s)

    This pre-student teaching field experience will focus on curriculum, science & literacy strategies, and instructional planning. Components will include planning, classroom management, teaching, and assessment.

    Prerequisite(s): Block I.
    Corequisite(s): @EDUC 303 , @EDUC 407 , @EDUC 409 , & @EDUC 411 .
  
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    @EDUC 409 - Childhood/Early Childhood Science Methods: PK-6


    3 Credit(s)

    This course is designed to guide teacher education students to develop a broad competency in teaching science to childhood/early childhood school children. Emphasis will be on the importance of science education as foundation for childhood/early childhood as students examine science content and teaching methods. This course requires observation/participation in the childhood/early childhood classroom. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): Block I.
    Corequisite(s): @EDUC 303 , @EDUC 407 , @EDUC 408 , & @EDUC 411 .
  
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    @EDUC 411 - Foundations of Classroom Behavior for Childhood/Early Childhood: PK-6


    3 Credit(s)

    Foundations of Classroom Behavior will examine classroom organization and management techniques necessary for success as a childhood/early childhood teacher. This course explores effective teaching strategies and curriculum implementation that foster positive learning environments within the childhood/early childhood classroom and serve the needs of all students. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): Block I.
    Corequisite(s): @EDUC 303 , @EDUC 407 , @EDUC 408 , & @EDUC 409 .
  
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    @EDUC 419 - Student Teaching: Pre K-6


    6 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI.
    This course will provide the future theatre teacher with a time and place where the theory of coursework at the college can be put into actual practice of teaching. Experience will include placement at the Pre K - 6 level. This course is designed to focus the future theatre teacher’s attention on a complete range of teacher functions and responsibilities found in Authentic Childhood settings. Restricted to Theatre Education students.

    Corequisite(s): @SECD 457  & EDLS 415 .
  
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    @EDUC 425 - Student Teaching Internship 1: PreK-Grade 2


    6 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Half semester of student teaching at PreK-Grade 2 Level. Fall and Spring.

  
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    @EDUC 426 - Student Teaching Internship II: Grade 3-6


    6 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: SI credit.
    Half semester of student teaching at grades 3-6 level. Fall and Spring.

  
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    EDUC 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    EDUC 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    @GRED 595S - @Special Topics


    1-6 Credit(s)


English as a Second Language

  
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    ESL 190 - Conversational English


    1-3 Credit(s)

    This course assists speakers of English as a foreign language with areas where they need improvement in order to succeed at the university level, including listening comprehension, speaking, reading, grammatical structures, and cultural understanding, with possibilities for individualized help in areas of special needs. Spring

  
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    ESL 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    ESL 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    ESL 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    ESL 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    ESL 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    ESL 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    ESL 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    @ESL 497 - Teaching English Practicum: Conversation Partners Program


    3 Credit(s)

    Teaching ESL Practicum is a Service Learning course offering the opportunity to help international students adjust to social life in the U. S. and improve their English proficiency and their understanding of American culture. The course helps American students to understand another society and culture, gain an international perspective and experience, build cross-cultural competency, prepare to live in a multicultural world or to teach in a multicultural classroom. This linguistic and cultural exchange makes students more sensitive to language, offering opportunities to improve their English while also learning about their own culture and that of their partners.

  
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    ESL 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Environmental Studies

  
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    ENVR 110 - Introduction to Environmental Studies


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: FC credit.
    This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of environmental issues. It incorporates the social, political, economic, cultural, and biophysical dimensions of a diversity of environmental problems and solutions. Human impacts on the environment, historical and contemporary views of the environment, and potential solutions to current environmental problems will be examined. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ENVR 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    ENVR 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    @ENVR 210 - Environmental Futures


    2 Credit(s)

    This is a required course for ENVR majors, designed for students to gain skills and knowledge as environmental citizens and professionals. Through class exercises, guest speakers, and independent research, students prepare for future internships and professional or graduate work in Environmental Studies. The course also helps students to develop their individual program of study and career planning skills - including resume writing, cover letters, and interviewing. Environmental Studies majors only. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): ENVR 110 .
  
  •  

    ENVR 290 - Environmental Inquiry


    3 Credit(s)

    This course introduces students to the concept and practice of interdisciplinary research methods, including arguments for, and critiques against interdisciplinary research. It examines why environmental issues lend themselves to the practice of interdisciplinarity and the process of scientific knowledge production. It introduces students to research methodologies commonly found both in the natural and social sciences and the humanities. Students will work through the stages of an interdisciplinary research project. Environmental Studies majors only. Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ENVR 110 .
  
  •  

    ENVR 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    ENVR 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    ENVR 310 - Adirondack Environmental History


    3 Credit(s)

    This study of the environmental history of the Adirondack region will give particular focus to the interrelated natural and cultural history of today’s Adirondack Park. Current land use conflicts will be regarded as the legacy of a human history of territorial contest and ambivalent attitudes toward nature, embracing the full range of conservation issues in other American protected areas and many developing countries as well. Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): ENVR 110 .
  
  •  

    ENVR 320 - Policy & Protected Areas


    3 Credit(s)

    Conservation has long been taking place in protected areas of all varieties, from national parks and forests preserves to seashores and monuments. In this course we will look at both local and global protected areas and examine what policies have been successful conservation strategies and why. The course will use CIS, research, and discussion to create a project on a park of international importance. We will begin the course with a focus on the Adirondack State Park as a model for the world.

    Prerequisite(s): ENVR 110  or BIOL 101 .
  
  •  

    ENVR 330 - Ecology and the Mind


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will introduce students to the current global epoch we occupy. The Anthropocene, which began with the industrial revolution and extends to include our own contemporary moment, signals human’s recognizable geophysical influence on all exosystemic components at a planetary scale. Since 1950, which roughly marks the onset of “the Great Acceleration,” scientists have in fact recorded the greatest exponential rise in atmosphere carbon dioxide in the planet’s history. While conventional scientific and political discourse has struggled to evaluate the variety of effects the Anthropocene-and associated environmental degradations- has had/is having on the human mind, this course will engage students in the study of environmental philosophy, criticism, literature, and film that represents the psychological results of denying human’s evolutionary need to connect with healthy ecosystems.

    Prerequisite(s): ENVR 110 .
  
  •  

    ENVR 340 - Environmental Justice Narratives


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines the concept of environmental justice, as well as the associated concepts of environmental racism and radioactive colonization, through an interdisciplinary lens. The environmental justice narratives we find in literature, nonfiction, and documental films will introduce environmental studies students to the experiences of marginalized oppressed, and overlooked individuals and communities contending with and responding to environmental harm, which comes to bear on such communities disproportionately. An examination of these narratives will moreover demonstrate to students that nature is not only found in “wilderness,” but also in the places where many of us live and work, and revise our understanding of “environment” showing that nature exists in National Parks and nuclear waste sites, wild rivers and mega-dams, industrialized food production and the human body. Ultimately, this course will illuminate for students the reality that environmental harm always comes to bear on human lives and that environmental challenges are inseparable from social issues and concerns.

    Prerequisite(s): ENVR 110 .
  
  •  

    ENVR 360 - Equity and the Outdoors


    3 Credit(s)

    This course will introduce students to the concept of the “adventure gap,” which will illuminate the reality that individuals hailing from minority, indigenous, LGBTQIA, disabled and/or middle- and lower-class communities, among other marginalized communities, are underrepresented in outdoor recreation. In this course, we will investigate the ways in which majority communities have excluded marginalized individuals from the arena of outdoor and adventure recreation. We will, moreover, attend to shifting trends in contemporary outdoor recreation, wherein minority recreationalist and athletes are carving out a space for themselves in the able-bodied, white-male-dominated realm of outdoor recreation.

    Prerequisite(s): ENVR 110 .
  
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    ENVR 391 - Field Project


    1-6 Credit(s)

    This course is the field experience for the Environmental Studies major. Each student will participate in a self-designed internship or field project with a non-profit or government organization. As a service-learning project, the field project will provide students with hands-on experience in the environmental field while providing service to the organization where they work. Instructor permission required. Fall, Spring, and Summer.

    Prerequisite(s): ENVR 210 .
  
  •  

    ENVR 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
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    ENVR 398 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
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    ENVR 485 - Research in Environmental Studies


    1-6 Credit(s)

    This course is comprised of a student designing, performing, interpreting and summarizing a research project under the supervision and guidance of a staff member. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ENVR 490 - Senior Seminar


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI & SI credit.
    The course is the culmination of the Environmental Studies major. It brings together academic and experiential components of the major and provides students with an opportunity to complete an independent research project, which students present to the entire Environmental Studies community. Students will demonstrate proficiency in conducting independent research and analysis of an environmental issue, and synthesize course work, experiential opportunities and research to critically assess and analyze a contemporary environmental issue. Environmental Studies majors only. Senior standing required and instructor permission required. Fall and Spring.

  
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    ENVR 495 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    ENVR 498 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)


Exercise Science

  
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    @EXSC 305 - Personal Training Fundamentals


    4 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: PE credit.
    This course provides an overview of the personal training profession and aids students in preparation to sit for the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Certified Personal Trainer exam. Key course topics include: exercise science and theory; health and fitness assessment; administration; program design and implementation; nutrition and lifestyle modification; and professional administrative considerations. The course is delivered in both classroom and practical settings. Registration for the ACSM exam is optional. Exercise Science majors and Fitness minors only. Equivalent to PE 305.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 107  or BIOL 151  or BIOL 210 .
  
  •  

    @EXSC 420 - Strength and Conditioning


    3 Credit(s)

    Introduces the study of theory and application of concepts that influence the design of strength and conditioning to optimize individual and team performance adaptations. Specific emphasis is placed on sport-specific assessment and prescription of annual training programs. Topics include performance testing, resistance training, sport-specific skill development (power, speed, agility, reaction time), energy system conditioning and periodization as they relate to enhanced performance and fitness. Successful course completion aids in preparation for NSCA certification.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 403 .
  
  •  

    EXSC 425 - Exercise Physiology


    3 Credit(s)

    This course examines the physiological adaptations to exercise for fitness, with consideration of factors that affect physical performance and methods for evaluating physiological capacities. Spring.

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 107   or BIOL 151  or BIOL 210 .
  
  •  

    EXSC 450 - Kinesiology & Movement Science


    3 Credit(s)

    Examines human movement principles as they relate to musculoskeletal anatomy and normal function. Emphasis is placed on role of external and internal forces that govern motion. The course will expand the student’s understanding of functional musculoskeletal anatomy and the relationship between physics principles and human movement.

  
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    @EXSC 460 - Exercise Assessment & Prescription


    3 Credit(s)

    Gen Ed: WI credit.
    Addresses the knowledge, skills and abilities employed to effectively assess fitness levels, interpret assessment results and design an exercise program. The course lecture/laboratory format places emphasis on exercise testing theory and methods, conducting client interviews, demonstration of appropriate exercise leadership skills, exercise prescription and program design. Successful course completion aids in preparation for ACSM certification.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 403 .
  
  •  

    @EXSC 490 - Internship in Exercise Science


    3 Credit(s)

    Exposes students to hands-on practical experience that promotes refinement of the knowledge, skills and abilities accumulated through the preceding coursework. Students complete a semester of experiential learning placed in a setting based on their area of interest (clinical, athletic, corporate, wellness). To enroll, students must successfully complete all courses required for their major.


Finance

  
  •  

    FINA 195 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    FINA 198 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    FINA 295 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    FINA 298 - Tutorial


    1-3 Credit(s)

  
  •  

    FINA 301 - Finance


    3 Credit(s)

    This course focuses on the sources and costs of funds used by businesses to obtain the assets needed for operations. It also analyzes working capital components and the sources and uses of cash. Additional topics include the basic analysis of risk and return, the time value of money, and an introduction to basic financial statement analysis. Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 202  and CIS 125 , or MATH 125 , or STAT 100 .
  
  •  

    @FINA 320 - Management of Risk and Insurance


    3 Credit(s)

    This course focuses on analyzing and managing the risks inherent in running any economic enterprise. Emphasis will be placed on identification of risk exposure and using specific types of insurance to address those exposures. This course may be of interest to Math majors interested in actuarial science.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 125 , or MATH 125 , or STAT 100 . As warranted.
  
  •  

    FINA 395 - Special Topics


    1-12 Credit(s)

 

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